a thoughtful web.
Share good ideas and conversation.   Login or Take a Tour!
ThurberMingus's profile
ThurberMingus


stats
following: 23
followed tags: 66
followed domains: 2
badges given: 0 of 3
hubskier for: 1290 days




recent comments, posts, and shares:
ThurberMingus  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Tesla Wedge

Should have known by trying to cut off one argument I'd start another on forum etiquette. Sorry for butting in.

ThurberMingus  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Tesla Wedge

I'm not the hubski argument umpire and I'm not here to defend or demonize kleinbl00. I've just been lurking here long enough to see the exact same pattern of snark/calling bs/acting butthurt about fifty times. It just gets dumber until one of you quits.

I don't really have an opinion on Tesla or trucks either, but I might be able to find a video on cold rolling steel if you cared.

ThurberMingus  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Tesla Wedge

This conversation happens every month on some random topic.

ThurberMingus  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Tesla Wedge

Just say you like the truck and move on already.

The guy knows some materials and knows some cars and you aren't about to change his mind cus he himself is the one that thought burros how to be stubborn asses.

ThurberMingus  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I don't like bonsai but I like this tree . . .

It's been interesting to think about it in terms of the respect a tree deserves instead of in terms of human needs or responsibility. Thanks for answering my question.

The aesthetics and art of bonsai are a high enough purpose to justify it for me, though I am probably valuing that and the inherent worth of a tree differently than you.

ThurberMingus  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I don't like bonsai but I like this tree . . .

I really don't know what to say to that. Everything about about agriculture or gardening or domestication is changing or at least redirecting biological drives to suit our purposes better. That can be done in a cruel way, but I don't think it is an inherently cruel activity. I'm not sure when I would call doing something to a plant cruelty.

A bonsai at least a mature tree that goes through is whole life cycle, just dwarfed by pruning and limited soil.

ThurberMingus  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I don't like bonsai but I like this tree . . .

Just curious - but why don't you like bonsai?

I've liked them as long as I can remember. Nature art and ornamental gardening combined. Don't have any of my own though.

ThurberMingus  ·  56 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: A thing I made.

It's the whole self-similar thing:

The first 3 notes are A-B-A. A-B-A repeats a lot of places so let's replace it with α.

So now play the instrument longer (imagine zooming out one level). A-B-A-C-A-B-A = α-C-α. Hey, that looks similar. Let's call it β for short.

Zoom out the timescale again and now the instrument plays β-D-β, which also repeats in a bunch of places so…

ThurberMingus  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Uncovering the Seeds of a Post-Lawn Future

It's probably bias from knowing already, but pokeweed looks like it's poisonous and it wants everyone to know it.

ThurberMingus  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 16, 2019

    I'm still in good shape and I intend to keep it that way.

That's the spirit. I have an aunt who had a bad concussion and there were some long term and some permanent effects. I think from her brain swelling - not sure, it was maybe 10 years ago now. It did take time for her and her family to adjust - time to adjust and time to guess what to adjust - her/family/environment/etc. It's easy to get hung up on differences but she's the same person she was before. And by now, it's a bit like she switched out some pet peeves - normal before, normal now, chaos in the middle. I don't know if that's relevant to you, but I'm sharing in case it's useful to hear about someone else dealing with a brain injury.

I only have one piece of advice but I don't know if you'll like it. Sprinkling cayenne pepper on the dirt will keep squirrels from digging up the planters without harming them. Ihope they get a whiff of it and back off without snorting a lungful, but I'm not sure because I never caught them in the act.

ThurberMingus  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Uncovering the Seeds of a Post-Lawn Future

Might be pokeweed. Though at this time of year they usually have berries

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca_americana

ThurberMingus  ·  60 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Halloween costumes by the neural net GPT-2

    Meat Belt

If you're going as Gaga, commit to it. Don't tone it down.

ThurberMingus  ·  64 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

Found this yesterday while checking the permaculture tag:

ThurberMingus  ·  64 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

Thanks, we’re being careful about what we can afford, and we're keeping some safety margin in ours budget. It’s a good time for us even if it's not the best time in the market.

ThurberMingus  ·  64 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

Forgive me if I'm unable to let a lighthearted thing go...

You are overestimating the carbs needed to run or underestimating the carbs available from gathering. We're not talking about olympic sprinting regimen, but trotting just fast enough to keep an animal from panting in the shade long enough to cool off. Its also possible to run with super low number of carbs, even if it feels like hell until you're used to it.

ThurberMingus  ·  65 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

We have started looking for a house to buy, which is exciting and mentally exhausting. Only kinda scary. Our lease is up in December.

ThurberMingus  ·  65 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9th 2019

I don't think we're on Beer Street anymore, Toto

ThurberMingus  ·  66 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

    Basically we need agriculture to persistent hunt, which defeat the purpose

It doesn't defeat the purpose, really. Depending on what they're growing or gathering, supplementing with 10% antelope could be a huge benefit.

ThurberMingus  ·  66 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

Liebenberg's point is that hunting is a complex intellectual task, however you do it.

I think my takeaway with regards to endurance is that you need it, however you hunt, even if that just means looking for the right ambush spot for today's conditions while you walk for miles gathering other food.

ThurberMingus  ·  66 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

In Born to Run McDougal references The Art of Tracking: The Origin of Science by Louis Liebenberg as evidence that humans have been persistence hunting in Africa since forever. I have only read bits of it, but it doesn't really say that.

Mostly it's about how important it is to know what an animal will do from the signs it leaves behind.

All the methods would take endurance. Even ambush hunting takes legwork to know where the herds will be as they move. But the important part is the brain work, not the ability to persist through stupidity.

From Chapter 5: Hunter-Gatherer Subsistence.

    Persistence hunting

    Occasionally, small animals may be knocked down with a throwing club and finished off at close quarters, or if the animal is stunned and takes off, it may be run down. Large birds may also be knocked down with throwing clubs. The young of small mammal species are frequently run down on foot and caught by hand (Lee, 1979). Slow-moving animals, such as antbears and porcupines, are easily run down when encountered in open country (Silberbauer, 1981). Animals such as eland, kudu, gemsbok, hartebeest, duiker, steenbok, cheetah, caracal and African wild cat may be run down in the hotter part of the day and killed when they are exhausted. The animal is stalked and startled to make it run while the hunter follows at a steady pace. This process is repeated until the animal is exhausted and can be finished off with a spear or club (Steyn, 1984a).

    !Xo hunters at Lone Tree Borehole, for example, use this method, and concentrate on different species at different times of the year. Steenbok, duiker and gemsbok are run down in the rainy season, because the wet sand forces open their hoofs, thereby stiffening the joints. Kudu, eland and red hartebeest are run down in the dry season. because they tire more easily on loose sand.

    In the early summer, before the rains break, animals are poorly nourished. If a ruminant is prevented from chewing its cud on the chase, it develops indigestion which eventually slows it down. This enables the hunters to come close enough to kill it with spears (Heinz, 1978b).

    In woodland, where visibility is limited by the vegetation, the animals may run out of sight and hunters must track them down before they have a chance to get enough rest. When running down a herd of kudu, for example, trackers will look to either side of the trail to see if one of the animals has broken away from the rest of the herd. They will then follow the animal that broke away. When it starts to tire, the weakest animal usually breaks away from the herd, to hide in the bush, while the others continue to flee. (Since a predator will probably follow the scent of the herd, the stronger animals have a better chance of outrunning it, while the weaker animals have a chance to escape unnoticed from where they have hidden themselves.)

    The success of this method depends on how quickly the animal can be tracked down. The most important factors are the hunter's tracking abilities and how difficult, or easy, the terrain is for tracking. In the immediate vicinity of Lone Tree Borehole the grass has been heavily overgrazed by cattle and the ground is quite barren, so it is relatively easy to follow spoor in the sand. The woodland, on the other hand, is still adequately vegetated for browsers like kudu. Further away from the borehole, where the ground is less barren, it becomes more difficult to track down animals quickly, while in areas where the ground is hard it would be very difficult to track fast enough to exhaust the animals. In difficult terrain the chances of success are slender unless the animal is weakened by injury, illness, or hunger and thirst.

That's one page about persistence hunting, in the 16 page chapter of hunting techniques of the Kalahari. Stealing kills from predators, ambushes, and cooperative ambushes are what he thinks early hominids did, but they take up less space.

The other 170 pages of the book are about the brain work, not the leg work.

ThurberMingus  ·  78 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: True Facts: Carnivorous Dragonflies

Nice. I needed something like that.

I was watching dragonflies flying around a field last week. They're like the attack helicopters of the animal world. Cruise, hover, strike, death from above!