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ThurberMingus


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ThurberMingus's recent comments, posts, and shares:
ThurberMingus  ·  10 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Halloween costumes by the neural net GPT-2

    Meat Belt

If you're going as Gaga, commit to it. Don't tone it down.

ThurberMingus  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

Found this yesterday while checking the permaculture tag:

ThurberMingus  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

Thanks, we’re being careful about what we can afford, and we're keeping some safety margin in ours budget. It’s a good time for us even if it's not the best time in the market.

ThurberMingus  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

Forgive me if I'm unable to let a lighthearted thing go...

You are overestimating the carbs needed to run or underestimating the carbs available from gathering. We're not talking about olympic sprinting regimen, but trotting just fast enough to keep an animal from panting in the shade long enough to cool off. Its also possible to run with super low number of carbs, even if it feels like hell until you're used to it.

ThurberMingus  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9, 2019

We have started looking for a house to buy, which is exciting and mentally exhausting. Only kinda scary. Our lease is up in December.

ThurberMingus  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: October 9th 2019

I don't think we're on Beer Street anymore, Toto

ThurberMingus  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

    Basically we need agriculture to persistent hunt, which defeat the purpose

It doesn't defeat the purpose, really. Depending on what they're growing or gathering, supplementing with 10% antelope could be a huge benefit.

ThurberMingus  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

Liebenberg's point is that hunting is a complex intellectual task, however you do it.

I think my takeaway with regards to endurance is that you need it, however you hunt, even if that just means looking for the right ambush spot for today's conditions while you walk for miles gathering other food.

ThurberMingus  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Persistent Myth of Human Persistence Hunting

In Born to Run McDougal references The Art of Tracking: The Origin of Science by Louis Liebenberg as evidence that humans have been persistence hunting in Africa since forever. I have only read bits of it, but it doesn't really say that.

Mostly it's about how important it is to know what an animal will do from the signs it leaves behind.

All the methods would take endurance. Even ambush hunting takes legwork to know where the herds will be as they move. But the important part is the brain work, not the ability to persist through stupidity.

From Chapter 5: Hunter-Gatherer Subsistence.

    Persistence hunting

    Occasionally, small animals may be knocked down with a throwing club and finished off at close quarters, or if the animal is stunned and takes off, it may be run down. Large birds may also be knocked down with throwing clubs. The young of small mammal species are frequently run down on foot and caught by hand (Lee, 1979). Slow-moving animals, such as antbears and porcupines, are easily run down when encountered in open country (Silberbauer, 1981). Animals such as eland, kudu, gemsbok, hartebeest, duiker, steenbok, cheetah, caracal and African wild cat may be run down in the hotter part of the day and killed when they are exhausted. The animal is stalked and startled to make it run while the hunter follows at a steady pace. This process is repeated until the animal is exhausted and can be finished off with a spear or club (Steyn, 1984a).

    !Xo hunters at Lone Tree Borehole, for example, use this method, and concentrate on different species at different times of the year. Steenbok, duiker and gemsbok are run down in the rainy season, because the wet sand forces open their hoofs, thereby stiffening the joints. Kudu, eland and red hartebeest are run down in the dry season. because they tire more easily on loose sand.

    In the early summer, before the rains break, animals are poorly nourished. If a ruminant is prevented from chewing its cud on the chase, it develops indigestion which eventually slows it down. This enables the hunters to come close enough to kill it with spears (Heinz, 1978b).

    In woodland, where visibility is limited by the vegetation, the animals may run out of sight and hunters must track them down before they have a chance to get enough rest. When running down a herd of kudu, for example, trackers will look to either side of the trail to see if one of the animals has broken away from the rest of the herd. They will then follow the animal that broke away. When it starts to tire, the weakest animal usually breaks away from the herd, to hide in the bush, while the others continue to flee. (Since a predator will probably follow the scent of the herd, the stronger animals have a better chance of outrunning it, while the weaker animals have a chance to escape unnoticed from where they have hidden themselves.)

    The success of this method depends on how quickly the animal can be tracked down. The most important factors are the hunter's tracking abilities and how difficult, or easy, the terrain is for tracking. In the immediate vicinity of Lone Tree Borehole the grass has been heavily overgrazed by cattle and the ground is quite barren, so it is relatively easy to follow spoor in the sand. The woodland, on the other hand, is still adequately vegetated for browsers like kudu. Further away from the borehole, where the ground is less barren, it becomes more difficult to track down animals quickly, while in areas where the ground is hard it would be very difficult to track fast enough to exhaust the animals. In difficult terrain the chances of success are slender unless the animal is weakened by injury, illness, or hunger and thirst.

That's one page about persistence hunting, in the 16 page chapter of hunting techniques of the Kalahari. Stealing kills from predators, ambushes, and cooperative ambushes are what he thinks early hominids did, but they take up less space.

The other 170 pages of the book are about the brain work, not the leg work.

ThurberMingus  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: True Facts: Carnivorous Dragonflies

Nice. I needed something like that.

I was watching dragonflies flying around a field last week. They're like the attack helicopters of the animal world. Cruise, hover, strike, death from above!

I think I've ranted before about how much more efficient it is to not burn carbon than it is to burn carbon to produce electricity to run equipment to sequester carbon...

Obviously the goal is to use renewable energy and stop digging/drilling, but it pisses me off because half the articles want to conclude there's nothing wrong with fossil fuels as there's someone in a lab experimenting with sequestration.

I wonder if a bog could be sped up to sequester carbon faster with a little bit of agg equipment.

ThurberMingus  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Nancy Pelosi Plans Formal Impeachment Inquiry of Trump

Today is way more concrete than previous noises, so it's positive momentum at least.

ThurberMingus  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Nancy Pelosi Plans Formal Impeachment Inquiry of Trump

Yes and no, mostly no I think.

Impeachment powers are very broad, not specifically defined, so they could have lined things up and done it long ago. The question is would they.

Will a heard of cats form ranks and march together? It's technically not impossible!!

And they've been threatening to promise to begin to decide whether they should form a committee to initiate a proceeding to determine...

ThurberMingus  ·  47 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 28, 2019

Hiking on vacation

On Lily Mountain looking at Longs Peak with Estes Cone in between. Late in the afternoon on a hazy day.

ThurberMingus  ·  53 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 21, 2019

Big Bend is a stunning place. My dad took me out there when I was 12 or 13. The highlight was taking a whole day to start out on the desert floor, hike up blue creek canyon to the south rim, and down into the basin. It's one of my favorite memories. I was almost too tired to stand by the end.

If you have the chance to go in March, all the cactuses boom. If you get the chance to go with a geologist, that's interesting too.

Enchanted Rock is a fun little park. Crawl through the caves on the back side. They hit capacity kind of early on weekends when the weather's nice though.

ThurberMingus  ·  54 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 21, 2019

Lots of pretty places to hike and camp in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah... It is a different experience going solo than with a crowd of scouts but I like it, for a few days at a time anyway.

Do you want see a bunch of places, or really get to know one place?

I've been to Rocky Mountain Ntnl Park on a few different vacations and I'm headed back again soon, and I don't think I've hiked the same trail twice yet.

But I've also done a vacation of staying each place a couple nights and staying at Parks or Forests or cities and seeing a bunch of places.

ThurberMingus  ·  62 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Howdy, Hubski! What culinary crimes is your home infamous for?

Between my family and in-laws I've had the whole range of TexMex from Abuela saying "now we'll feed you some real Mexican food" to the new white person all the way to white Grandma excited to show off her Mexican casserole to the new Mexican family member. The second is super cringey. The first was still unmistakably TexMex.

The main appeal is "this is the way Grandma makes it." By now there's better restaurants and Mexican grocery stores if you want to find them. But why do that when you've memorized the secret family ratio of Velvita and Rotel to make perfect queso.

There's also a "Spanish from Santa Fe" branch of the tree -- that mess doesn't translate to Texas' race situation at all but he tried anyway.

ThurberMingus  ·  62 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Howdy, Hubski! What culinary crimes is your home infamous for?

Yeah. I don't disagree with you on any if it. Just bugged me because "when white people encounter flavor and recoil in horror" is the broad market appeal change after cultural otherness/isolation caused a bunch of other changes.

ThurberMingus  ·  62 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Howdy, Hubski! What culinary crimes is your home infamous for?

    white people encounter flavor and recoil in horror clear to St. Louis

That explains casseroles in my second comment.

But "family recipes handed down for 150 years since we moved north to Texas" tend to taste like Taco Bell with better salsa whenever the family got stuck in a dying railroad town for a generation.

ThurberMingus  ·  62 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Howdy, Hubski! What culinary crimes is your home infamous for?

"Mexican casserole" is a surprisingly popular "white people TexMex" dish. It is made by taking ingredients for a TexMex enchilada dinner (enchiladas with rice and beans) and then just throwing it all in a casserole dish. The mildest available enchilada sauce is used, probably only a couple tablespoons for a 13x9 pan. If you're unlucky, your host used flour tortillas instead of corn and they all got gluey in the oven.

The strangest I've had thankfully hasn't caught on: a tamale casserole meal donated by a white lady to a largely Hispanic student group. It was made by buying enough tamales to fill the foil pans, unwrapping them all, and layering them in with sprinkles of unseasoned cooked ground beef and handfuls of shredded cheese, and heating until the cheese melted. We were pretty confused and just picked out the tamales.

ThurberMingus  ·  62 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Howdy, Hubski! What culinary crimes is your home infamous for?

TexMex horrifies anyone that didn't grow up expecting all Mexican recipes to be changed to use Save-A-Lot clearance ingredients.