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rd95's comments

So. What happens to the money that went into stocks when stocks crash? Does it disappear? Does it go back to the banks?

kleinbl00  ·  35 minutes ago  ·  link  ·  

Think of it as an exchange. A dollar is worth two coconuts. If you have two coconuts, you can reasonably expect to trade them for a dollar. Until there's a coconut blight, the coconut harvest goes down and demand for coconuts rises Now coconuts are a dollar each. Or maybe the Maldives discover an easy way to ship coconuts for Florida and suddenly coconuts are three for a dollar.

You don't have dollars. You have coconuts. The exchange of dollars to coconuts changes based on market conditions.

Suppose you're a big booster of solar energy, and you have a pension fund. In that pension fund you have ten thousand dollars. You decide SunEdison has a bright future so you buy ten thousand dollars worth of SunEdison stock. Now you have zero dollars in your pension fund but you know you can exchange it for whatever your 500 shares (or whatever) of SunEdison stock are worth.

THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART

You have already lost your money. Your money holdings are zero. However, you have traded them for what you think is a greater future value. And if SunEdison goes to $25, you can cash out your 500 shares (or whatever) and suddenly you have $12,500.

But you don't have that $12,500 until you exchange your shares for cash.

Now suppose that instead of going to $25, SunEdison blows up. Now, in addition to having zero dollars, you have 500 shares (or whatever) of worthless stock that you can exchange for exactly nothing.

So. Money is neither created nor destroyed. VALUE, on the other hand - the value of your investment - is fluid.

The money that went into the stocks was spent by whoever sold you the stocks. What you've lost, in a nutshell, is the money you'd get from selling it to someone else.

Does that make sense?

someguyfromcanada  ·  2 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Simply put, it remains with the person you bought the stock from. Even though the structure of a public market is complex, it is still essentially buying something (a stock certificate) from another person and assuming whatever risks or benefits may accrue to that thing.

rd95  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Facebook Changes Its Mission With Announcement About Groups

So basically, if anyone has stock in Facebook, it might be a good idea to bail before they eventually go the way of Myspace or Yahoo?

I know you didn't recommend DS9. I just thought I'd bring it up again in passing, because it's on in the background. I'm mostly watching it for the sake of friendship. The next time he comes over, I'm giving him one of my antennas, so he can watch old sitcoms and westerns on daytime TV.

kleinbl00  ·  1 hour ago  ·  link  ·  

It's a big question. Their PE ratio is unhealthy but it's not Amazon batshit or Tesla negative. They have revenue. They have a silo'd marketplace. But they're worth what they can get from advertisers and the advertisers be bitchin'.

I'm in cash. I'm not interested in this market.

I'm working on trying to read that graph. FAANG is the best anagram every though.

kleinbl00  ·  5 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

*Acronym

And yeah I love it

rd95  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

So. What happens to the money that went into stocks when stocks crash? Does it disappear? Does it go back to the banks?

kleinbl00  ·  35 minutes ago  ·  link  ·  

Think of it as an exchange. A dollar is worth two coconuts. If you have two coconuts, you can reasonably expect to trade them for a dollar. Until there's a coconut blight, the coconut harvest goes down and demand for coconuts rises Now coconuts are a dollar each. Or maybe the Maldives discover an easy way to ship coconuts for Florida and suddenly coconuts are three for a dollar.

You don't have dollars. You have coconuts. The exchange of dollars to coconuts changes based on market conditions.

Suppose you're a big booster of solar energy, and you have a pension fund. In that pension fund you have ten thousand dollars. You decide SunEdison has a bright future so you buy ten thousand dollars worth of SunEdison stock. Now you have zero dollars in your pension fund but you know you can exchange it for whatever your 500 shares (or whatever) of SunEdison stock are worth.

THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART

You have already lost your money. Your money holdings are zero. However, you have traded them for what you think is a greater future value. And if SunEdison goes to $25, you can cash out your 500 shares (or whatever) and suddenly you have $12,500.

But you don't have that $12,500 until you exchange your shares for cash.

Now suppose that instead of going to $25, SunEdison blows up. Now, in addition to having zero dollars, you have 500 shares (or whatever) of worthless stock that you can exchange for exactly nothing.

So. Money is neither created nor destroyed. VALUE, on the other hand - the value of your investment - is fluid.

The money that went into the stocks was spent by whoever sold you the stocks. What you've lost, in a nutshell, is the money you'd get from selling it to someone else.

Does that make sense?

someguyfromcanada  ·  2 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Simply put, it remains with the person you bought the stock from. Even though the structure of a public market is complex, it is still essentially buying something (a stock certificate) from another person and assuming whatever risks or benefits may accrue to that thing.

    But of course the stock market is going bugshit over it because the stock market no longer pays attention to what anything means.

Last I heard, Alan Mulally left Ford because stockholders were unhappy about the value of their shares. From what I've heard, GM is in similarly hot water. Both are on par with where they've tended to be historically, at least, if I'm reading the graph on Google right.

I think maybe the explosion in tech stocks has created unrealistic expectations, because I think if a stock today is at what seems at a reasonable place, I don't think there's much to be upset about. Apparently a lot of people disagree though.

rd95  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm working on trying to read that graph. FAANG is the best anagram every though.

kleinbl00  ·  5 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

*Acronym

And yeah I love it

rd95  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

So. What happens to the money that went into stocks when stocks crash? Does it disappear? Does it go back to the banks?

kleinbl00  ·  35 minutes ago  ·  link  ·  

Think of it as an exchange. A dollar is worth two coconuts. If you have two coconuts, you can reasonably expect to trade them for a dollar. Until there's a coconut blight, the coconut harvest goes down and demand for coconuts rises Now coconuts are a dollar each. Or maybe the Maldives discover an easy way to ship coconuts for Florida and suddenly coconuts are three for a dollar.

You don't have dollars. You have coconuts. The exchange of dollars to coconuts changes based on market conditions.

Suppose you're a big booster of solar energy, and you have a pension fund. In that pension fund you have ten thousand dollars. You decide SunEdison has a bright future so you buy ten thousand dollars worth of SunEdison stock. Now you have zero dollars in your pension fund but you know you can exchange it for whatever your 500 shares (or whatever) of SunEdison stock are worth.

THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART

You have already lost your money. Your money holdings are zero. However, you have traded them for what you think is a greater future value. And if SunEdison goes to $25, you can cash out your 500 shares (or whatever) and suddenly you have $12,500.

But you don't have that $12,500 until you exchange your shares for cash.

Now suppose that instead of going to $25, SunEdison blows up. Now, in addition to having zero dollars, you have 500 shares (or whatever) of worthless stock that you can exchange for exactly nothing.

So. Money is neither created nor destroyed. VALUE, on the other hand - the value of your investment - is fluid.

The money that went into the stocks was spent by whoever sold you the stocks. What you've lost, in a nutshell, is the money you'd get from selling it to someone else.

Does that make sense?

someguyfromcanada  ·  2 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Simply put, it remains with the person you bought the stock from. Even though the structure of a public market is complex, it is still essentially buying something (a stock certificate) from another person and assuming whatever risks or benefits may accrue to that thing.

rd95  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Farmers Take Out Millions In Loans To Raise Chickens For Big-Box Retailers

    Unless you're in the agriculture industry, or in the food industry, you might not know that a lot of chicken (especially things like wings) is coming from Brazil.

Refrigeration and shipping really affects a lot. I know a few years back, and probably still now, Africa had a huge problem with their local chicken farmers being undersold by frozen chicken shipped in from Europe. I can imagine, economically and politically, it was probably quite the mess.

rd95  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Facebook Changes Its Mission With Announcement About Groups

I wonder if now Facebook is struggling to stay relevant. While they're still a big company, their product line is less diverse than Google and they're not monolithic like Amazon.

As an aside, DS9 is getting better. I have a love/hate relationship with Quark. On the one hand, I absolutely hate Quark as a character, he's crafty and selfish and unscrupulous. On the other hand though, Armin Shimerman is, in my opinion, by far the best actor out of that cast and he makes Quark feel very real.

Also, the power failed here for just a second. I had to go back and reset the dryer. My TV, X-Box, and computer kept on chugging without a beat. God bless whoever invented battery backups.

kleinbl00  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

They bought Instagram because nobody under 25 uses Facebook. The only people who use Facebook are advertisers and people who don't mind choking on advertisements, or people whose high school friends are on Facebook instead of Instagram or Snapchat.

As an aside, I didn't recommend DS9. I just gave you a drubbing for (A) having it stand in for all of science fiction (B) slagging on a season of television near-universally reviled and then accusing everyone else of having low standards for liking the shit that we totally didn't. I gave up on DS9 after Season 4.

"For the record: Season 1 of DS9 is shit. Season 2 has some moments of brilliance. Season 3 is really good for about half of it, then it descends into shit. Season 4 and beyond are a waste of time."

cgod  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/11/11/social-media-update-2016/

Everybody says the kids don't use Facebook but at least some research says exactly the opposite. I'm open to looking at other figures but untill I see them I'll count the Facebook hating children as pundit lore.

kleinbl00  ·  1 hour ago  ·  link  ·  

"use" is such a slippery term. You'll notice that the study you found cuts off at 18; they ran the numbers in 2015 but "use" counts as "I've logged into it in the past two weeks.

Young adults have Facebook the same reason you have LinkedIn - that's where grownups expect to find you. College recruiters look at your Facebook. Employers look at your Facebook. Your friends look at Instagram and Snapchat, so Instagram and Snapchat are where your engagement is.

rd95  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

So basically, if anyone has stock in Facebook, it might be a good idea to bail before they eventually go the way of Myspace or Yahoo?

I know you didn't recommend DS9. I just thought I'd bring it up again in passing, because it's on in the background. I'm mostly watching it for the sake of friendship. The next time he comes over, I'm giving him one of my antennas, so he can watch old sitcoms and westerns on daytime TV.

kleinbl00  ·  1 hour ago  ·  link  ·  

It's a big question. Their PE ratio is unhealthy but it's not Amazon batshit or Tesla negative. They have revenue. They have a silo'd marketplace. But they're worth what they can get from advertisers and the advertisers be bitchin'.

I'm in cash. I'm not interested in this market.

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Farmers Take Out Millions In Loans To Raise Chickens For Big-Box Retailers

From what I understand, it's not too uncommon for farms to take out big loans to set up new projects and that through government subsidies, sales, etc. they can make that money back without that much risk. It also tends to be a good idea for farmers to diversify when they can. You never know when one product quickly falls out of favor and another one takes off. That said, there's tons of experience on raising pretty much everything out there, so I can't imagine it would be too big of a stretch for them to find the help they need to raise chickens when they need it.

rd95  ·  16 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 21, 2017

Walking meditation is a thing. You might look into it and see that it's something you'd find very doable.

rjw  ·  15 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

This sounds like a good idea, I never knew this existed!

rd95  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Sumer Sales, Oh My! What have you picked up, or plan to?

Ooh. Good answer. Both Portal games were a lot of fun and very memorable.

rd95  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: A Wee Stroll

mk! There's a bugski here! I can only badge this mind blowingly amazing post once.

AnSionnachRua  ·  15 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Haha, don't worry rd, it seems the others have you covered. ;)

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Why Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?

Wow. I looked them up on Wikipedia and apparently they're stamped and certified by UBS. I've read some pretty nasty things about them in the past, like fraud and money laundering and stuff. Gold is gold, but that association makes Kinebars seem sketchy too all of the sudden.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hey, man. Fanta was created so that Coca Cola could stay afloat in Nazi Germany. UBS is only marginally more evil than you would expect a money-laundering multinational headquartered in a tax haven to be.

You know you want 'em.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 21, 2017

Maybe see if the cafe is hiring? Try it for a bit, just to get some income coming in, making getting out of the house legit, and getting some structure back into your life?

weewooweewoo  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I like this cafe though, I don't want to ruin that. Joking aside, I'm really discouraged about structure, but the agency job I had was difficult for me mostly because I had 13 different clients. I'll try it, the one barista job I had was one of the best times I had in my life.

Before I do that, I currently have a $6000 invoice that I am terrified of writing. I don't feel like I deserve the money, and I am not in a good place today.

goobster  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Here's what I did: I billed in advance.

Seriously. It takes all the pain out of billing. It reinforced proper project scoping and developing meaningful and tangible deliverables.

And, most importantly, the people who agree to work this way are COMMITTED to the work. They are responsive, engaged, and get you answers to your questions right away.

Best of all? It increased my workload. I lost a few clients, sure. But they were quickly replaced by others who respected me, and valued my work.

My finger hovered over the "Publish" button that night, let me tell you! I don't think I slept a wink after I pushed the changes out to my web server, and proclaimed to the world that they had to PAY ME FIRST before I'd work with them. No freebies. No free consultations. Just demonstrably good work in my online portfolio, and the price list. Bam. That's it.

It was scary, but it was effective.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Why Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?

Okay. Well, the commercial that follows every reverse mortgage commercial says it is and now's the best time to buy and gold investments should be a cornerstone of any strong retirement plan.

Joking aside, I knew reverse mortgages are bullshit, but I seriously thought gold was up. That said, I'm not dumb enough to buy a $150 coin. I'd buy those flat little bricks with the fancy purity stamp or whatever it is. That is if I had money and was dumb enough to buy gold.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Kinebars. I've been tempted by kinebars a time or two myself.

here's the thing you need to know about goldbuggers - they fundamentally believe either (A) the world is about to be disrupted along the lines of the German depression (B) economics is fundamentally and irrevocably wrong and has been since the invention of fractional reserve banking in the Italian Renaissance (C) both. Obviously you can speculate on gold if you think everyone else is crazier than you but as a market, precious metals are predatory. The cash-for-gold guys are rapacious, and that's on top of the fact that the market price of your precious metal is about 1/5th what you paid for the jewelry it got made into.

And crypto nerds are goldbuggers with an aversion to physical things.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Wow. I looked them up on Wikipedia and apparently they're stamped and certified by UBS. I've read some pretty nasty things about them in the past, like fraud and money laundering and stuff. Gold is gold, but that association makes Kinebars seem sketchy too all of the sudden.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hey, man. Fanta was created so that Coca Cola could stay afloat in Nazi Germany. UBS is only marginally more evil than you would expect a money-laundering multinational headquartered in a tax haven to be.

You know you want 'em.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 21, 2017

"The Cabal of Eight Pt.21: Blood Fucking Red"

"Canada police investigate theft of fucking mummified human toe served in drinks "

"Why The Fuck Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?"

"TIH: JUne 21, 1732- Fucking Johann Christoph Freidrich Bach is born"

There needs to be a Firefox extension for this.

ThatFanficGuy  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

why the fuck am i wasting time doing this i have philosophy exam tomorrow

A.S. Don't copy anything from here. Formatting screws up the code.

Go to the page where you'd like to see the replacement.

Open console (or web inspector or whatever).

Copy the following string.

  var choices = ["the fuck", "in the fuck", "in the name of Jesus Fucking Christ"];

Paste the string into the console. Press Enter.

Copy the following string.

  document.querySelector('body').innerText = document.querySelector('body').innerText.replace(/[w
    W]hy/g, function (match) { return match " " choices[Math.floor(Math.random() choices.length)] });

Paste the string into the console. Press Enter.

You should now see the replacement at work.

It's crude and the changes are temporary, but this should amuse you for a couple of minutes with various websites. The above function will return a different choice for replacement every time. To keep the same choice, copy/paste/Enter the following two strings separately instead:

  var choiceIndex = Math.floor(Math.random()  choices.length);

and

  document.querySelector('body').innerText = document.querySelector('body').innerText.replace(/[wW]hy/g, function (match) { return match  " "  choices[choiceIndex] });

EDIT: Fuck. mk, check this out. I thought the two-space prefix was supposed to make it a <code>/<pre>.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Why Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?

Shoot. Next you're gonna tell me they're also the ones driving up the price of gold too.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Gold isn't up.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Okay. Well, the commercial that follows every reverse mortgage commercial says it is and now's the best time to buy and gold investments should be a cornerstone of any strong retirement plan.

Joking aside, I knew reverse mortgages are bullshit, but I seriously thought gold was up. That said, I'm not dumb enough to buy a $150 coin. I'd buy those flat little bricks with the fancy purity stamp or whatever it is. That is if I had money and was dumb enough to buy gold.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Kinebars. I've been tempted by kinebars a time or two myself.

here's the thing you need to know about goldbuggers - they fundamentally believe either (A) the world is about to be disrupted along the lines of the German depression (B) economics is fundamentally and irrevocably wrong and has been since the invention of fractional reserve banking in the Italian Renaissance (C) both. Obviously you can speculate on gold if you think everyone else is crazier than you but as a market, precious metals are predatory. The cash-for-gold guys are rapacious, and that's on top of the fact that the market price of your precious metal is about 1/5th what you paid for the jewelry it got made into.

And crypto nerds are goldbuggers with an aversion to physical things.

rd95  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Wow. I looked them up on Wikipedia and apparently they're stamped and certified by UBS. I've read some pretty nasty things about them in the past, like fraud and money laundering and stuff. Gold is gold, but that association makes Kinebars seem sketchy too all of the sudden.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hey, man. Fanta was created so that Coca Cola could stay afloat in Nazi Germany. UBS is only marginally more evil than you would expect a money-laundering multinational headquartered in a tax haven to be.

You know you want 'em.