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rd95  ·  8 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Report: A Chinese Automaker Offered to Buy FCA

;)

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Report: A Chinese Automaker Offered to Buy FCA

My memory is fuzzy, of the American Three, which one didn't ask for a bailout? ;)

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

the one that makes a parade float with a pony on the trunk

rd95  ·  8 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

;)

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Report: A Chinese Automaker Offered to Buy FCA

"Report: FCA Isn't Quite Ready to Sell Its Giant, Polished Turd"

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

...said the guy who loves Mustangs

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

My memory is fuzzy, of the American Three, which one didn't ask for a bailout? ;)

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

the one that makes a parade float with a pony on the trunk

rd95  ·  8 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

;)

rd95  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Trump rips Amazon, says it causes 'great damage to tax paying retailers'

No.

There will not be enough gig jobs to go around.

Gig work is often inconsistent and unstable. There's no guaranteed paycheck.

Gig workers often lack resources like affordable healthcare from employers, places to actually work, and collective bargaining power with their fellow peers.

There will always be a pool of low skill, low knowledge workers, and/or low drive workers. There is very little room in gig work for people like them.

The disappearance of low skill, low paying jobs will mean a huge chunk of purchasing power will disappear from the economy. With less money circulating throughout the economy, there will be even less jobs to go around, creating a negative feedback effect that will impact even gig workers negatively.

I understand where you're coming from, but I think it's important to understand that not everyone is cut out to be major go getters like you. The people who will lose these jobs are often already in very precarious socio-economics positions as it is. They're staring disaster in the face here.

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

Honestly? I don't like it myself. Movies, for example, have five to ten minutes of rolling credits for everyone from the directors and actors to the caterers and chauffeurs. I think if someone is part of a project, credit should be given where credit is due. Plus, it'd add another layer to keeping track of the whole trajectory of someone's creative career.

I also think you're not giving yourself enough credit here. Seriously. I bet there's actually an ass-ton of stuff that you've learned in art school that a laymen wouldn't learn on their own unless they're on some kind of autodidactic spree. Shoot, just the other day I was watching a few YouTube videos on cinema and color theory and each five to ten minute video was like a mini-revelation. The foundation of knowledge you have is important as shit and by knowing it and exercising it, you're an active participant in keeping it alive.

tacocat  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

It took a while for my girlfriend to understand that if I am not happy with something I've made it's not a self esteem issue or I don't think I'm talented and that kind of reaction seems common.

I've taught myself a ton of stuff that I didn't learn in school. And I learned a lot there and had experience people will never have the opportunity to be part of. Do you know what a cupola is? In the foundry world? Because the meaning of the word foundry is lost on a lot of people, let alone that it was once an important industry in this country. I can talk shop about melting metal and it's amazing that this suburban white boy can have a valid opinion about the field or that I've been close enough to molten iron to cinge my eyelashes.

That's a lot to unpack and it's a consideration I give to a lot of what I do. Even in things like being paid to pick up dog shit like I am right now. I don't know. I think I'm very grounded in a lot of ways. More so than many people in my opinion

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Trump rips Amazon, says it causes 'great damage to tax paying retailers'

Honestly? I kind of like that NPR tries to humanize things a little bit. That said, there are times where I think the facts should really speak for themselves.

I use both sites cause neither one use an ass-ton of third party services to distribute their content and I just accept the fact that both are pretty liberal. While I think that might influence my world view a bit, I think also knowing that they're liberal helps me take their words with a grain of salt. That said, you go to some websites and they drop a half dozen cookies from a ton of random domains and something about that just bugs the crap out of me. Do these guys really need platforms like Disqus to make their sites work? Maybe. But it makes them annoying too.

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Report: A Chinese Automaker Offered to Buy FCA

Ha! I was originally gonna title the post "Report: A Chinese Automaker Offered to Buy a Giant Turd" but I didn't want to editorialize.

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Chrysler under Daimler - bought for $36 billion, sold for $7.2.

Chrysler under Fiat - up 38% this year alone, Jeep all by itself valued at 14.7 euros a share.

I'm one of the first to slag on the Italians but they wiped the floor with the krauts on this one.

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

"Report: FCA Isn't Quite Ready to Sell Its Giant, Polished Turd"

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

...said the guy who loves Mustangs

rd95  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

My memory is fuzzy, of the American Three, which one didn't ask for a bailout? ;)

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

the one that makes a parade float with a pony on the trunk

rd95  ·  8 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

;)

rd95  ·  13 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Trump rips Amazon, says it causes 'great damage to tax paying retailers'

I didn't want to post this in global, since I'm kind of internet binging today and posting a ton of stuff already. But, since you brought up a retail thread, I'll toss this in too.

End of the checkout line: the looming crisis for American cashiers

    A recent analysis by Cornerstone Capital Group suggests that 7.5m retail jobs – the most common type of job in the country – are at “high risk of computerization”, with the 3.5m cashiers likely to be particularly hard hit.

    . . .

    The suburban shopping malls that hollowed out main streets in the 1970s and 80s have increasingly become hollow shells themselves, and more closures are expected. Headlines about America’s most recognized brands – Sears, Macy’s, RadioShack, Payless Shoes – have been dominated by store closings and bankruptcies. Credit Suisse has projected that 8,640 stores will close in 2017, easily surpassing the rate of closures during the great recession.

    The fallout from the impending crisis will likely be felt most by a different population from Trump’s fetishized ideal of the white, male worker. According to the Cornerstone report, 73% of cashiers are women. And an analysis of retail workers by Demos found that black people and Latinos are overrepresented in the cashier positions, which are the lowest paid.

I'm really starting to not like The Guardian, because they're becoming very hyperbolic, have had a few shoddy reviews for movies and art that would never find their way in a high school newspaper, and Trump can't seem to sneeze without them criticizing him for it. That said, the numbers for retail are depressing as fuck and this is a nice, gloomy article.

francopoli  ·  13 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

The Guardian went from a liberal answer to the WSJ to some weird cringe far left publication about a decade ago. Most of the people there worth reading and thinking about left for The Intercept or bailed to do their own thing. I still like The Economist, and the reporting on the WSJ is still good as long as you stay off the opinion pages (Thanks NewsCorp). Lately I've been hitting up the raw Reuter's feed and then going to the "main" news sites to see if there is more in-depth fact checking and writing. A perfect example of a turn into that "WTF are you doing" zone is the AV Club. It went from a pop culture review site to almost a religious fanatic church bulletin. They doubled down during gamergate three years ago and now seem to be pulling back into raw reviews from what I see, but yea. It is like they went full Buzzfeed for a while and now that their traffic is plunging they forgot what made them popular.

Reporters don't report news any more it seems. They report opinions. Or maybe we are old enough that we see it more than when we were younger, fuck if I know. This is why I fucking HATE NPR. And on paper I should be an NPR fan. But EVERY. FUCKING. STORY. they make into this weird personal experience in some odd attempt to put a single human face on every story they report on. I just can't do it and the last time I had NPR on, about a month ago, it seems to be worse. I need data, not feelings, to make up my mind about things and there are fewer places out there that offer what I need. Even the BBC is taking a hard turn toward opinion/emotional journalism.

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Honestly? I kind of like that NPR tries to humanize things a little bit. That said, there are times where I think the facts should really speak for themselves.

I use both sites cause neither one use an ass-ton of third party services to distribute their content and I just accept the fact that both are pretty liberal. While I think that might influence my world view a bit, I think also knowing that they're liberal helps me take their words with a grain of salt. That said, you go to some websites and they drop a half dozen cookies from a ton of random domains and something about that just bugs the crap out of me. Do these guys really need platforms like Disqus to make their sites work? Maybe. But it makes them annoying too.

goobster  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

So a vanishing market for low-paying work is still going away... and this is news?

Here's a tip: If your job requires repetitive physical activity, it's going to go away. Sooner rather than later.

This is not something to be mourned, or to rend our clothes about. This has been the natural progression for at least 4 generations of humans. Who has not worked this out yet?

In other news, a kid posted a cardboard sign on my street this week, advertising lawn mowing for $40.

In other news, a good friend of mine in her 20's started a business as a dog-walker for "difficult" dogs, and she makes as much money as she wants, and turns down clients every single day. She has more business than she could possibly handle.

In other news, my friend is a successful blacksmith. He makes ornate iron railings, doors, gates, and fabulous giant art installations for casinos in mainland China. He never graduated from high school.

In other news, I'm gonna pay a guy $130 to come to my office next week and detail the outside of my car because I'm too damn lazy to get all the moss and mold and pine tree sap out of all the little nooks and crannies on my car, and it'll rust if I don't get this done regularly.

The decreasing need for repetitive, low-paying work with no career path, is a good thing. For both the workers and the employers.

kleinbl00  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

    Here's a tip: If your job requires repetitive physical activity, it's going to go away. Sooner rather than later. This is not something to be mourned, or to rend our clothes about. This has been the natural progression for at least 4 generations of humans. Who has not worked this out yet?

See if you can find where England closed the coal mines on this chart:

Your first statement is correct: if your job can be automated, it will go away. Your second statement is incorrect: This is something to be mourned or rend our clothes about because it causes lasting sociological damage. Underemployment in the UK right now might be as high as 1 in 6 people, depending on how you count it; the fact that every trash television trend the US is subjected to comes in no small part from the fact that their welfare state is 30 years ahead of ours. People forget: the Luddites were right. The advent of large aristocratically-owned textile mills to replace individual artisan-class family businesses pretty much defined the grinding poverty and degradation of Victorian England. Watch the life expectancies go down:

So on the one hand yes, progress is all about bad jobs going away to be replaced by better jobs (theoretically). But on the other hand, progress is also about hypercapitalists eliminating inefficiencies that generally provide a living for people.

    Alfredo Duran, a 37-year-old New Yorker, has been staring down that threat. He began his retail career at the Gap, taking part in that quintessential American rite of passage: getting a summer job in high school. Twenty-one years later – after a career that took him from fast fashion chains to department stores to high-end boutiques and saw him climb the ladder from cashier to visual merchandiser to store manager – he’s looking for a way out.

Let's say Alfredo has been averaging what? $25k a year? Over 21 years, he's a half million dollars worth of wages into retail. And yeah- give a tech firm a half million dollar incentive to replace Alfredo and he's fuckin' gone. Except he's not. He's still got an apartment, he's still got a family, he's still gotta eat and whereas he was a breadwinner and a member of society before, now he's a liability. Price of goods should go down as his salary no longer comes out of the overhead but the fact of the matter is, his boss is still employed (and is probably getting richer) but Alfredo is a shiftless bum now.

I guess he can come pick the moss out of your grille for $130 except you've already got a guy that does that. So now maybe Alfredo is gonna do it for $100. So your moss guy suddenly finds his livelihood eroded. This is why every tile job in Southern California looks like hammered ass - the guys who knew how to do tile had to compete on price with the guys sitting under a tree outside Home Depot and pretty soon the artisans were gone.

There are consequences. For laborers, for employers, for consumers, for governments. In the long run I'm glad that silicosis is uncommon now. In the short run I worry about 3.5 million cashiers (maybe a million of them Union) who suddenly can't feed their families.

rd95  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

No.

There will not be enough gig jobs to go around.

Gig work is often inconsistent and unstable. There's no guaranteed paycheck.

Gig workers often lack resources like affordable healthcare from employers, places to actually work, and collective bargaining power with their fellow peers.

There will always be a pool of low skill, low knowledge workers, and/or low drive workers. There is very little room in gig work for people like them.

The disappearance of low skill, low paying jobs will mean a huge chunk of purchasing power will disappear from the economy. With less money circulating throughout the economy, there will be even less jobs to go around, creating a negative feedback effect that will impact even gig workers negatively.

I understand where you're coming from, but I think it's important to understand that not everyone is cut out to be major go getters like you. The people who will lose these jobs are often already in very precarious socio-economics positions as it is. They're staring disaster in the face here.

am_Unition  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Thanks for doing some legwork, much appreciated.

One of the best/only media commentary websites that I've found is mediabiasfactcheck.com, and here is their little assessment of The Guardian. Not nearly as harsh on them as what I'd offer as well; I've been burned by The Guardian lately, can't remember the article's topic, but it was a very poorly written piece that was a far cry from what I would define as respectable journalism.

I have a friend who was looking to get funding to continue building periodic.news (I got him to include Hubski! heh), but I think that little project is dead in the water, for now at least. We had some ideas to take it wayyyyy past what I've seen from groups like the peeps at mediabiasfactcheck.com.

If you or anyone else know of some more media bias assessment groups, I'd love to see 'em. Tagging francopoli just in case.

francopoli  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

am_Unition  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Hahah, we're all allowed to have some mental dichotomies, and I see where she's coming from. Still funny though. :)

rd95  ·  15 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

Since I have you, let me ask your opinion on something else. I was watching a documentary the other month, about a guy making paintings that eventually auctioned off for literally hundreds of thousands of dollars. One of the things that stuck with me though, was that he wasn't the only one making the paintings. His studio had a couple dozen assistants helping him make the backgrounds, touching up the colors, doing the super fine detail work, etc. Yet he's the only one who gets to sign the pieces. Money aside, cause I don't know how much he paid his assistants, I found it kind of unfair that the other people who worked on the pieces didn't get to put their stamps on it. I know the artist is the one with the overall vision and I know this is actually pretty standard practice, but it still stuck with me. Your thoughts?

tacocat  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Well it was very common when art was a trade for a master to apprentice someone. And the master might not do much of anything in the end. There are paintings that are important because Leonardo probably painted part of them but received no credit because he was under tutelage.

So I can keep a thing like that in mind while being pissed off by that kind of thing being done today. Damien Hirst might be the most powerful working artist today. Because reasons. But he does that shit. And he can't even authenticate works of art assigned to him. He can literally not be able to tell if he did something himself or if it was done in his studio or if it was done by a ten year old with a spin art maker. I hate the limey fuck.

That's a very extreme example that I refer to a lot because of the different levels of absurdity that should be apparent. In less stupid examples I guess I think of it more like an ethics issue. Art is subjective so if that thing bothers you like it does me then that is a valid opinion even if it just seems weird and you can't diagnose the problem like I can. But people also just want a thing to put on the wall and that's fine too I guess even if I think that makes them morons. But someone could appreciate something I do for reasons I could even be offended by for whatever reason that's probably a personal failure by myself in execution or expectation.

I'm pretty well aware at this point exactly how much art school is a joke. The state of Georgia mildly endorses the fact that I'm an artist through giving me a BFA but I didn’t learn anything that was so critical that it separates me from some grandma painting roses on the weekend. I'm just saying that success in art is not very logical in the way it can be granted. It can be a humbling reality and the number of obnoxious art people I've met would do well to take it down a few pegs and realize how unimportant they are and the same thing for what they do.

I feel like I obscured the line between cynicism and pragmatism there but I'm not bitter about a whole lot of art things

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Honestly? I don't like it myself. Movies, for example, have five to ten minutes of rolling credits for everyone from the directors and actors to the caterers and chauffeurs. I think if someone is part of a project, credit should be given where credit is due. Plus, it'd add another layer to keeping track of the whole trajectory of someone's creative career.

I also think you're not giving yourself enough credit here. Seriously. I bet there's actually an ass-ton of stuff that you've learned in art school that a laymen wouldn't learn on their own unless they're on some kind of autodidactic spree. Shoot, just the other day I was watching a few YouTube videos on cinema and color theory and each five to ten minute video was like a mini-revelation. The foundation of knowledge you have is important as shit and by knowing it and exercising it, you're an active participant in keeping it alive.

tacocat  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

It took a while for my girlfriend to understand that if I am not happy with something I've made it's not a self esteem issue or I don't think I'm talented and that kind of reaction seems common.

I've taught myself a ton of stuff that I didn't learn in school. And I learned a lot there and had experience people will never have the opportunity to be part of. Do you know what a cupola is? In the foundry world? Because the meaning of the word foundry is lost on a lot of people, let alone that it was once an important industry in this country. I can talk shop about melting metal and it's amazing that this suburban white boy can have a valid opinion about the field or that I've been close enough to molten iron to cinge my eyelashes.

That's a lot to unpack and it's a consideration I give to a lot of what I do. Even in things like being paid to pick up dog shit like I am right now. I don't know. I think I'm very grounded in a lot of ways. More so than many people in my opinion

rd95  ·  16 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Fighting Fires For Free, Aging Volunteers Struggle To Recruit The Next Generation

I tried, for a short period of time, to find some volunteer work this summer. I had to put a lid on that idea for a few reasons, but I digress. One of the things I found a bit upsetting was the number of volunteer positions that really constitute as skilled labor. If the position you want filled has a requirement of a two year degree and/or continuing education in the field the position is for, you really oughta pay people at least something. There's a huge difference between being able to clean up litter along a creek bed and say being a chemist's assistant at an environmental clean up company.

As for finding people who are physically fit, I recommend organizations try to recruit people who are not only young, but physically active. College sports players readily come to mind. NASCAR Teams, for example, recruit college athletes to be on their pit crews saying "Not everyone is gonna get into the NFL, but if you're willing to be trained, we have a heck of a job for you." I think if fire departments and such did something similar, and offered good pay, they'd have a few takers. Prior military service people, especially the Coast Guard, would be another good place to look.

francopoli  ·  14 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

The problem is that common jobs get no glory.. and no/minimal pay. Teachers are underpaid. EMT's are underpaid. Firefighters are underpaid. There is a vast, critical, list of 'jobs' out there that do not pay or pay minimal. Back in the days when we had a functional society (as he looks back through Wratten23A eyepiece filters) being someone involved in the community was a status symbol. Yea the scout leader did it for free, but they earned respect from the community as someone who gave a shit. Teachers have always been underpaid, but even up to the 1970's teaching was a well regarded and respected profession. I know I sound like a broken record here, but the blame for this lies on the Baby Boomer generation. So many of these people have the attitude "DO NOT INCONVENIENCE ME OR ELSE" coupled with an attitude of "that is someone else's problem stop bothering me." So all the grunt work style jobs got shit on for 50 years as a whole generation went for high dollar careers. Then they used those careers to shit on blue collar work, gut the middle of the country and send quite a bit of the manufacturing base overseas. We all cannot be millionaires and we all cannot be the guy in charge; someone has to do the work and those jobs often times don't pay more than median for the area.

    As for finding people who are physically fit...

WOW. Holy shit what a great idea that I would have never even thought of. Go talk to high school athletes, many of which are facing fast food and walmart as jobs, get them to be volunteer firefighters and pay to get them in EMT training. Huh. I'm gonna go write some letters today, thanks man.

rd95  ·  16 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

I might swing by this week and see what they got. Heck, I might see if they have a whole book on Art Noveue.

rd95  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 16, 2017

    limit yourself to the three hours surrounding sunrise, and the three hours surrounding sunset.

One of the nice things about this maxim is that this time period is when a lot of animals are most active, to avoid the heat of the mid-day. So if you're ever into shooting wildlife, this works on another level.

rd95  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

What would be your opinion on this? In all honesty, missing ropes and background audience aside, I like the sketch more than I like the actual painting. There's something about the black and white making the two clashing figures seem that much more dramatic, more desperate.

tacocat  ·  16 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

I mean it's honestly pretty awesome just looking at it as an image and being unaware of things I sometimes take into account such as medium. But weighing that kind of thing at all seems to create opinions that I feel are nuanced but are obnoxious at best when I fail to carefully unload my pretentions to someone who doesn't have time for that bullshit.

I'll mention that I've done sketches that were much more satisfying than the final product. It sucks. It's cool that you even notice the distinction. I think every artist would know what it's like to accept a level of failure that occurs frequently. But I've said things like that before to people who get hung up on the word failure.

But words mean different things to different people at different times even. Imma just go get drunk and read Wittgenstein. (Not really.)

rd95  ·  15 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Since I have you, let me ask your opinion on something else. I was watching a documentary the other month, about a guy making paintings that eventually auctioned off for literally hundreds of thousands of dollars. One of the things that stuck with me though, was that he wasn't the only one making the paintings. His studio had a couple dozen assistants helping him make the backgrounds, touching up the colors, doing the super fine detail work, etc. Yet he's the only one who gets to sign the pieces. Money aside, cause I don't know how much he paid his assistants, I found it kind of unfair that the other people who worked on the pieces didn't get to put their stamps on it. I know the artist is the one with the overall vision and I know this is actually pretty standard practice, but it still stuck with me. Your thoughts?

tacocat  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Well it was very common when art was a trade for a master to apprentice someone. And the master might not do much of anything in the end. There are paintings that are important because Leonardo probably painted part of them but received no credit because he was under tutelage.

So I can keep a thing like that in mind while being pissed off by that kind of thing being done today. Damien Hirst might be the most powerful working artist today. Because reasons. But he does that shit. And he can't even authenticate works of art assigned to him. He can literally not be able to tell if he did something himself or if it was done in his studio or if it was done by a ten year old with a spin art maker. I hate the limey fuck.

That's a very extreme example that I refer to a lot because of the different levels of absurdity that should be apparent. In less stupid examples I guess I think of it more like an ethics issue. Art is subjective so if that thing bothers you like it does me then that is a valid opinion even if it just seems weird and you can't diagnose the problem like I can. But people also just want a thing to put on the wall and that's fine too I guess even if I think that makes them morons. But someone could appreciate something I do for reasons I could even be offended by for whatever reason that's probably a personal failure by myself in execution or expectation.

I'm pretty well aware at this point exactly how much art school is a joke. The state of Georgia mildly endorses the fact that I'm an artist through giving me a BFA but I didn’t learn anything that was so critical that it separates me from some grandma painting roses on the weekend. I'm just saying that success in art is not very logical in the way it can be granted. It can be a humbling reality and the number of obnoxious art people I've met would do well to take it down a few pegs and realize how unimportant they are and the same thing for what they do.

I feel like I obscured the line between cynicism and pragmatism there but I'm not bitter about a whole lot of art things

rd95  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Honestly? I don't like it myself. Movies, for example, have five to ten minutes of rolling credits for everyone from the directors and actors to the caterers and chauffeurs. I think if someone is part of a project, credit should be given where credit is due. Plus, it'd add another layer to keeping track of the whole trajectory of someone's creative career.

I also think you're not giving yourself enough credit here. Seriously. I bet there's actually an ass-ton of stuff that you've learned in art school that a laymen wouldn't learn on their own unless they're on some kind of autodidactic spree. Shoot, just the other day I was watching a few YouTube videos on cinema and color theory and each five to ten minute video was like a mini-revelation. The foundation of knowledge you have is important as shit and by knowing it and exercising it, you're an active participant in keeping it alive.

tacocat  ·  12 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

It took a while for my girlfriend to understand that if I am not happy with something I've made it's not a self esteem issue or I don't think I'm talented and that kind of reaction seems common.

I've taught myself a ton of stuff that I didn't learn in school. And I learned a lot there and had experience people will never have the opportunity to be part of. Do you know what a cupola is? In the foundry world? Because the meaning of the word foundry is lost on a lot of people, let alone that it was once an important industry in this country. I can talk shop about melting metal and it's amazing that this suburban white boy can have a valid opinion about the field or that I've been close enough to molten iron to cinge my eyelashes.

That's a lot to unpack and it's a consideration I give to a lot of what I do. Even in things like being paid to pick up dog shit like I am right now. I don't know. I think I'm very grounded in a lot of ways. More so than many people in my opinion

rd95  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

I looked up Maxfield Parrish last night after seeing your comment. His work is pretty cool, very textured. I might have to see if any nearby museums have his stuff so I can see better images in person, because Wikimedia is great and all, but it's no substitute for real things. For example, Japanese block prints? Totally more fascinating and impressive in person.

Also, a little side story, it looks like he did some ads for General Electric's Mazda Lightbulbs. When Dala and I first met, I was renting a house with a garage. One day, for a reason I forget, we had to get into the rafters of the garage where we found six (I think it was six) worn boxes for Mazda Lightbulbs. That in itself was pretty cool, but opening them up, all the bulbs were intact and probably never used because the filaments weren't broken. I didn't take them, because all of that stuff belonged to the landlord, but that was probably one of the coolest things I ever stumbled upon, if only because you don't expect to find 60+ year old lightbulbs unused. Though looking back now, I kind of regret not asking if I could have bought just one . . .

kleinbl00  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

I reckon you will find another Mazda lightbulb somewhere.

And I reckon your local library has shit tons of Maxfield Parrish books.

rd95  ·  16 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

I might swing by this week and see what they got. Heck, I might see if they have a whole book on Art Noveue.

rd95  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An ad for Job Cigarette Papers by Alphonse Mucha

From what I understand (which isn't a lot), Art Noveue style and mass printing techniques both heavily influenced each other. It's amazing how artists are able to understand the strong and weak points of such a medium and really capitalize on it (the evolution of printing and comic books is another good example).

For a guy who's similar (similar style, same time period, similar geographic location) but also different, you should check out Ivan Bilibin. I stumbled on Bilibin one night after clicking one Wikipedia link after another. Someone recommended I check out Mucha after I told them how much I liked Bilibin.

tacocat  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

I went to art school and I doubt anyone can understand the complexities and subtleties of the act of being paid to make art. Those first five words I hesitate to even use in that sequence. I'm kinda not sure where to go here because I fear seeming pretentious.

The idea that art is special or that being an artist is any different than being a bricklayer or a plumber. For most of history it's been a trade and people like Mucha or Toulouse la Trec exist in a period of significant flux. So things that we maybe don't realize about art were overlapping and it afforded certain artists the opportunity to truly stand out and it's particularly noticeable to me for commercial artists with a legacy because it's not a highly thought of field now and just understanding the level of work put out consistently since advertising was invented, the fact that a few people working within those constraints can be held up among fine artists without notice by a great deal of viewers today that the basic difference in their goals and even vocation was not much like a painting down the hall by a Monet for example, that things like that exist comfortably at all in a similar space to something closer to a work where the end goal is maybe being in a museum at all, that's just a very long winded attempt to explain the subtlety you can pay a lot of money to appreciate going to art school. I'm now not very confident that what I just wrote is an actual sentence or a very complex fragment of one.

As long as I'm spewing about art school, spending 6 figures in school to learn a thing you don't need to go to school for and is not very important can create a hard to explain perspective. Most people in art school know it's a waste of time and waiting tables is a possibility and even a joke because no one thinks it will happen to them. Art's kinda important but not like medicine is and with some time to think about a big decision to make at 18, to try to make a living off of a hobby, comes an acceptance for what was probably a mistake but there's still an appreciation for the entire thing and also the field as a whole. I guess it would be kinda like losing a ton of money gambling and still having had fun at the time but not being very proud of it in the end

Devac  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

    's amazing how artists are able to understand the strong and weak points of such a medium and really capitalize on it

That's what comes with proficiency in something. For example, people doing ink calligraphy aren't insisting on using 'traditionally made' paper out of snobbery (at least usually). It's because they learned, either through research or from experience, that any rolled paper will have a preferential direction of tiny 'trenches' that will allow ink to flow easier through them in one direction more than the other and make the edges blurry. This happens because cellulose fibres settle more in one direction than the other.

You can even see this effect by shredding toilet paper. It rips smoothly in one direction but not the other. That's just one of those things about paper manufacturing one might easily overlook.