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kantos's profile
kantos

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following: 16
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hubskier for: 1972 days

This is not my first account; add 168 days to the 'hubskier for' count.

recent comments, posts, and shares:
kantos  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 22, 2021

    My understanding is that Yellowstone blowing would take a couple years off the calendar, not much more. I believe Pinatubo bought us what, 5 years? Ain't nuthin' but I imagine the folx in Pinatubo's shadow would rather have foregone the eruption.

This was harder to find modeling for Yellowstone on than expected given the Yellowstone craze in early 2010s, and existing data of Pinatubo.

Below quote’s source

    The 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines was about 1,000 times smaller than Yellowstone’s largest known eruption; it caused temporary, yet measurable, changes in global temperatures. The sulfur dioxide emitted from the volcano interacted with the atmosphere, which cooled the Earth’s surface for three years following the eruption. At the height of the impact, global temperatures dropped by 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit (0.7 degrees Celsius).

#2

    Several eruptions during the past century have caused a decline in the average temperature at the Earth's surface of up to half a degree (Fahrenheit scale) for periods of one to three years. The climactic eruption of Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991, was one of the largest eruptions of the twentieth century and injected a 20-million ton (metric scale) sulfur dioxide cloud into the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 20 miles. The Pinatubo cloud was the largest sulfur dioxide cloud ever observed in the stratosphere since the beginning of such observations by satellites in 1978.

98, so pretty good, considering my general doctor offered up a CT scan with contrast and waived co-pay to look for clots. The way we discussed it, the urgency isn’t there, and more likely than not, I’m young enough that we should re-visit after 4 months IF I’m still finding breathing less-than-effortless. I’ve found it seems to be the top of my lungs providing more resistance to air…

Ahywho, the doc stated pretty plainly they could run an ECG, but couldn’t do anything even if something shows up.

Close family friend is a cardiologist who will provide prelim advice before I consider a local heart doc.

    And because it fucks with your heart'n'lungs, "dying in your sleep" is a thing post-COVID does to you.|

    Losing sleep over that fact will reduce the chances, right?

kantos  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 22, 2021

Your first few sentences triggered a need to visit more current findings… regardless of what was found the delivery implies smaller explosions are not concerning… sure. The BIG one occurring is not likely now, you’re right. Another concern off the mind, great! But regarding following:

    Explosive Yellowstone events are in the past.

One concept which stuck with me from astronomy: geophysical calamities are a matter of when - not if. From a human’s perspective in 2021, maybe they are a thing of the past. But historically, there have been roughly 0.8 mil between Yellowstone’s 3 super-explosions. So, 140,000 years from now would be a time to re-evaluate.

Speaking of, beginning to narrow in on climate/land criteria before suitability modeling/GIS application. It’s odd how my parents are so checked out, while their sons are quietly talking of migrating the whole family ahead of the worst to come (generations out, mind you).

Expecting that mindset never hurt.

EDIT:

Ref. source layered with Army Corps of Engineers and USGS data.

https://www.vox.com/2014/9/5/6108169/yellowstone-supervolcano-eruption

kantos  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 22, 2021

In spite of the rougher sleep, I’ve added an extra mattress topper, white noise (via fan) and an eye-mask have been a nominal help. The topper was the biggest bang for my buck.

Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson’s how I’m starting out. It’s a comedic telling of struggling with mental health. Lawson has a knack for witty, conversational way of writing that compliments hilarious stories.

kantos  ·  31 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 22, 2021

Overall Health

The past couple weeks have been draining. If I'm honest... I haven't had a truly restful weekend in recent memory - easily months. At least, not restful by how kantos two years ago would have defined it.

Perhaps its rooted in COVID - and not just the era, but the lasting side effects of July's contraction. I cannot exercise without exhibiting what I'd expect are asthmatic symptoms which keep me seated or laying down for 72 hours. Even leisurely strolls in Southern heat left me horizontal in less than an hour. I've gained 40 pounds since quarantine began, and frustrated at getting knee-cap'd during what used to be a quick recovery period of minutes.

Next step pending as a doctor appointment is scheduled for Friday.

Work

First work anniversary at the current job has passed. I've learned so much just getting the job. At the time, only partial benefits were offered. So, I argued for higher pay to compensate for lack of benefits... to HR... bad idea. Well, then I plead the case to the hiring manager (my now boss)... which gained me a higher starting salary than their advertised ceiling.

Since then, I've gotten a full suite of bennies and two raises, plus a title change. All under a year. Fuck yeah.

This place (especially my boss) has given me free range to hone what I've learned from grad school and then some. Tomorrow I'm rolling out a fully scripted set of Python tools by yours truly to help my tinnie-tiny department on the latest software upgrade coordinated my (for the people in the back), again, yours truly.

On the spectrum of "holy shit" to "nice code bro," overall, it's more the latter in terms of bragging rights when looking at the scripts themselves. But, it feels like a 'holy fuck' to the dept, so I'm rolling with it.

The company is small, and landing this job makes me wonder if I'm getting compensated enough still. Despite this, on-the-job training I've been annoying enough to 'manifest [my boss' rage]' is finally on the horizon, and it is exactly on course for what I've aspired to 'round about a decade now.

Books

I gotta get back in the habit of reading. Just reviewing my comments when I first joined Hubski make me feel as though I've gotten dumber.

Hot damn.

Found a 'fun read' to kindle the flame again. Next in line are Dune sequels and Foundation to further stoke the flame.

Future

Speaking of flame, I'm beginning talks with family about re-locating within the next decade or so to get ahead climate change induced migration. Finding better land, community, and environmentally sound regions are in-mind as I'm planning a non-related trip with a childhood buddy.

The only conceivable reason to stay where we are is the safety in-case Yellowstone blows... which would also cause an Earth cooling event, I'd guess would run counter to global warming? Yeah... none of this is palatable. Sorry to leave this on a sour note pubs.

FWIW, my work is actively involved in countering climate change (a point of pride), but man the uphill battle ahead does look tiring.

kantos  ·  39 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 25, 2021

Don’t worry, it’s only awful when you’re outside. I’m quite a bit lower in latitude, but I remember temperatures reaching 90 in December a little over a decade ago. Most of the summertime is spent indoors unless you’re running (early morning, late night) or at the beach. Spring/Fall are prime times to do outdoor activities. For better or worse, northerners generally acclimate by the next year (sometimes two, depends how cognizant ((shocked)) they are).

The native Americans thought the southern lands were well and good far before the Spanish got here in the 1500s. Most everyone else since has had the same thought as you if they didn’t grow up here. I will say though… taking a flight from dry states (Texas) back to Florida is a shock getting off the plane. Easy to forget how much water is in the air. Basically mer-people around these parts.

kantos  ·  39 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 25, 2021

New pubski reminded me! The humidity generally stays. It should have started cooling down (slightly) for you. By January, you should feel more at home, weather-wise (December, if lucky).