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comment by goobster
goobster  ·  253 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: May 25, 2022

As someone who has hired people overseas, I'll tell you it is a LOT easier to hire someone locally, than remote. If I - the hiring manager - go through the whole process (and time commitment) of looking over your resume, having an interview, then another interview, and then giving you an offer letter ... and you refuse, it's a HUGE waste of my time.

And when you are not already "in country", there are about a bajillion things that can stop you from accepting my job offer.

Then I've wasted all that time and energy, and have to do it all over again.

If you want a job in Europe GO THERE. Seriously. Just go there on a tourist visa with a Eurail Pass, wander a bit around different youth hostels until you find a city you like, then start looking for work.

The easiest thing to do is get your ESL certification. https://www.tefl.org/

No matter where you go, you can pick up classes teaching people English. This is an EXCELLENT way to make a little income, have a flexible schedule, meet locals, and brush up on your local language skills.

AND, while doing this, you are learning the local culture, hanging out with locals, and can start networking and looking for work.

Because if a hiring manager finds out you are here already, working, and connecting with the local community, you are a WAY more interesting person to hire! They don't want to helicopter in some dopey American kid that has never been anywhere, and is going to have a meltdown the first time they can't find a McDonalds. They want to know you are willing to take chances, do what needs to be done to make ends meet, and WANT to be in their city/country and appreciate their culture, etc.

THAT is an easy hire. Even if I need to get you a work visa, you are FAR more interesting than someone overseas who (probably) won't even come if I offer you the job, or will melt down in the first three months once they do arrive.





kleinbl00  ·  253 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    They don't want to helicopter in some dopey American kid that has never been anywhere, and is going to have a meltdown the first time they can't find a McDonalds.

This advice is a bad fit for a public health professional with a masters degree in epidemiology from Emory. Do you find your counsel goes down more smoothly when you call the recipient "dopey?"

A friend was recruited by an engineering firm in Brisbane. Had she been to Australia? No. Did they offer her the job before she'd even been there? Yes. Did she visit, on my advice, before accepting? Yes. Did she decide Brisbane was a shithole? Yes. My experience with other trained professionals is that their hiring does not follow the same arc as that which is led by HR. We recruit doctors very differently than how we recruit front desk.

goobster  ·  253 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ah. Well, anyone with a professional degree and certification is going to be easier to recruit, the narrower their role/function, and their employment history.

That's a different type of recruiting, entirely.