Share good ideas and conversation.   Login, Join Us, or Take a Tour!
comment by FirebrandRoaring
FirebrandRoaring  ·  36 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Eastern Europeans Tire of Being Sold Inferior Products

    It was cheaper for me to buy a bunch of computer parts in Germany and get back than getting them locally, so there's that. Same goes for used cars. Some of the medications are a lot (I'm talking up to 70% in my case) cheaper when bought online from the Czech Republic, but it doesn't hold in general.

Do you know if that holds true for other Eastern European countries? Could it be because of the import taxes in Poland?

I'm not trying to oppose you here. I find the situation appalling but would like to know more before I say something.




goobster  ·  35 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I haven't lived over there for more than a decade, but I purchased all my electronics and musical gear outside Hungary to avoid paying a 50% - 500% markup.

The Apple laptop I bought visiting my family in Seattle was $1500. In Hungary it would have been $3500.

The bass guitar I had made for me in Dublin was 1200EUR. It was cheaper for me and my girlfriend to fly to Dublin for the weekend, pay for and pick up the guitar, and fly home to Budapest, than it was for me to get a similar instrument in Hungary.

At every level, this played out the same way for electronics and "finished" goods.

But I bought all my produce, meat, sparkling water, and other foodstuffs directly from local farmers at the markets, as I walked home from work each day. Lunch meat, cheese, sausage, beer, fruit and vegetables... everything I ate was pretty much local.

Dunno what it is like today, but I hear it is just as expensive as western europe for everything, now.

Devac  ·  35 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Do you know if that holds true for other Eastern European countries?

I suspect it holds true but would have to do some research in order to make my answer anything better than an annoyed guess. I'll try to look it up over the weekend, but don't promise anything.

    Could it be because of the import taxes in Poland?

Maybe? Same as for the first question. In the meantime: here's the best reference database compiled by Polish government that I could find.

And yes, it's pronounced exactly like Ishtar. The contrivance of the acronym and its full form suggests it was a deliberate choice.