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rrrrr's comments

Try telling a room full of audiophiles that you dig Bose headphones. The reaction won't be far off what Kipling gets you. In both fields the self-appointed connoisseurs and defenders of high taste will do everything they can to shore up an identity they spent years building. Imagine if all those years of careful study and/or all that money spent didn't make you any better than you were before you started, or any better than this rube who's so infuriatingly confident! Imagine if it didn't gain you anything! Imagine if you'd done it all just for love! The horror! So... gotta fight for that hard-won identity.

kleinbl00  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·  

1) Having been in rooms full of audiophiles, I never speak, let alone tell them anything. Do not look the gorilla in the eye.

2) I am constitutionally incapable of digging Bose headphones. Although, yeah, you're right, QC-2s were pretty cool.

None of those things are problems with poetry. They're problems with assholes who like to talk about poetry or play games with poetry. The trick is to ignore the assholes and enjoy poetry.

_refugee_  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I will say I find the current atmosphere of modern poetry to be entirely too "serious", without humor, certainly incapable of looking at itself with any humor or without a certain smug pretension. Half of the rockstars I see coming up in the modern poetry community are writers I could never be or write like because I don't have the requisite experience with oppression or want to constantly write about it.

There are fun poets and fun poems out there, and even fun lit mags that have a better attitude. But they're one offs, hard to find, and as a whole the community doesn't foster these groups or people with such attitudes at all - there isn't going to be a renaissance where everyone stops looking down their noses anytime in the foreseeable future in the poetry community, (I guess the American poetry community is the one I'm mostly referring to and have experience with) and it's a pity. Poetry's very busy isolating itself.

humanodon  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Yes, I agree that the American poetry community in general is overly earnest and self-inflated. I think I've shared this before, but in Jennifer L. Knox' A Gringo Like Me we see one of those hard to find examples that you're talking about. Maybe it's just me, but poetry in the popular consciousness (in English at least) is supposed to be something transcendent, transformational. It's supposed to be achievable by an elevated class of humanity and enjoyed by similarly elevated people, which is fucking dumb. Anyway . . .

ArtemusBlank  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

As someone that has competed in poetry slams before, I can agree with this. I do a lot of humor and satire pieces but they just don't resonate with an audience at times because the poetry slam audience is a lot of times looking for that piece about race, despairing emotion or some other social issue. It is the same thing over and over again with some different words I feel. It's frustrating to compete at times because I kinda know what the audience is looking for but it's not exactly me. There are times when I hit well with an audience but It's become less and less often these days. I could conform to what the audience wants as I'm a minority myself but I really don't want to go down that road because it wouldn't fully be me. There are times when I look at the poetry slam community and I just walk away to other poetry scenes that don't focus on slam at all because I feel like I fit in better at places where no one really cares about slam.

rd95  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    There are times when I look at the poetry slam community and I just walk away to other poetry scenes that don't focus on slam at all because I feel like I fit in better at places where no one really cares about slam.

Do that. Write for a new audience, yourself.

_refugee_  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Art often is about/driven by self-expression and I agree that this should be among a young (or even old) artist's driving forces to create. However, it's foolish to think that art and self-expression can exist in a vacuum without an audience and that be totally fulfilling. If you only share your self-expression with yourself, it can feel kind of masturbatory.

It's not satisfying to create art that just collects dust afterwards. Maybe Dada would put on a ballet show for an audience of no one but we should acknowledge that art, from writing to dance including everything in between, almost universally relies upon an audience as much as a creator. What can you really effectively express if you only express it to yourself? Art is a conversation and writing is and wants to be part of that conversation.

I see a lot of the time that "you should write just for you!" and yes you should do that but that aphorism also puts this idea into heads that "you shouldn't want or need an audience to feel good about what you create," which I think falls a little far from the truth. I write great poems that I love but once I write them, I also want to share them with people. And it's natural and understandable to have that desire and feel irritated when the literary structure/canon/environment in which you write is never going to embrace you -- I still write, sure, and I find people to share things with -- it shouldn't ever stop someone from creating -- but tell you what it sure can do is knock the wind out of your sails a little.

rd95  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I agree. Mostly. I think in the case of ArtemusBlank though, who has complained quite a few times about the slam scene this past year, that maybe he oughta try something new for a bit. Maybe rediscover why he fell in love with poetry in the first place. Sometimes you just gotta let go of the world and be you, if even for only a little bit.

am_Unition  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Jives well with the notion of "weaponized prestige" I've been railing against in my own personal life.

Communities of repute foster stagnation all too often, unless they have some specific characteristics instilled into their cultures. Still sniffing out those characteristics, but most are intuitive; healthy skepticism of authority, utilitarian, inclusive, etc.

kleinbl00  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

You're not wrong? But if you ask someone who knows anything about poetry, you run the risk.

My entire interaction with academia and poetry was 100% about how everything I liked was doggerel and everything I didn't was genius. There are few things that make me want to put my fist through faces than hearing about goddamn red wheelbarrows.

thenewgreen  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    There are few things that make me want to put my fist through faces than hearing about goddamn red wheelbarrows.

It's a good poem though... (ducks head).

kleinbl00  ·  8 days ago  ·  link  ·  

That's fine. You can say that and no one will criticize you. However:

    When the cholera comes -- as it will past a doubt --

    Keep out of the wet and don't go on the shout,

    For the sickness gets in as the liquor dies out,

       An' it crumples the young British soldier.

    Crum-, crum-, crumples the soldier . . .

I have had three "experts" tell me that the above is doggerel.

We can agree to disagree. But absolutely no one is going to lambast you for assuming the majority position that Williams is a goddamn genius.

thenewgreen  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I've a always liked Ogden Nash poems:

There is something about a martini

Ere the dining and dancing begin

And to tell you the truth

It's not the vermouth

I think that perhaps it's the gin

I used to recite that, when I was a bartender, to my customers that ordered a martini. Tips increase when you you recite poetry. Pretty sure poetry snobs would turn their nose up at that one.

kleinbl00  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

That's... a limerick. Limericks are held in such low regard that they'll teach you how to make them in 3rd grade but by fifth, when they ask for "poetry" they'll accept a fucking haiku (without paying any attention to the meter or kireji) but they'll refuse to accept a limerick.

When I had to hand in poetry I'd do sonnets. Teachers were so impressed that I could handle ABBA ABBA CDE CDE that you could write straight fucking nonsense and they'd take it.

Of course they'd take straight fucking nonsense as free verse too

But not limericks

thenewgreen  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Limericks are wonderful. Because they're so easy and ubiquitous, a good limerick is actually high art.

kleinbl00  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I agree.

But neither of us teach English.

rrrrr  ·  25 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I have a friend that just joined Hubski. What should they know?

Reddit's like a city; Hubski's like a small town. You can get to know people better here and they can get to know you. Things move slower. Circles of friends emerge and sometimes it may feel cliquey. But the upside of that is that your interactions here can be more meaningful than in the big anonymous city.

You might find yourself thinking a bit harder before you post. (Is that article you agree with actually any good?) Don't aim for popularity, aim to make the conversation better. The site's not set up to be an echo chamber. Muting is available but is really a last resort after actually talking to people.

And on Hubski it's kind of normal for people to reveal a bit about themselves. That can feel odd if you're used to sites where people hide in the crowd. The crowd here turns out to be small and relatively friendly. People even meet up, have drinks and post photos of the event. Crazy.

The White House denied it, only for Trump to confirm it (and attempt to defend what he did) on Twitter.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39937258

rrrrr  ·  38 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Russian Intelligence is at (political) war

That photo! Money and power can't buy you happiness, folks!

    The agency’s own overreach and mistakes have created a new vulnerability, further exacerbated by the publishing of Edward Snowden’s stolen files.

Didn't Snowden leak NSA files, not CIA?

kleinbl00  ·  51 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It is not a column particularly concerned with technical accuracy.

Sure, it's a problem, but his diagnosis seems off the mark:

    Part of the blame must reside with the toxic, feminist, politically-driven whispering campaign that “all men are potential rapists”. Modern masculinity has been put in the dock, and there it appears to remain.

I'd suggest the problem in the UK has more to do with (1) tabloids stoking paedophile paranoia for decades (blowing up each case into a fear that paedophiles lurked in every neighbourhood just waiting to prey on your kids), and (2) the discovery of a systematic cover-up of paedophiles in prominent positions in UK society (Jimmy Savile, other entertainers, several politicians from the 1960s to the 1980s at least, the Rotherham scandal, etc.). And we don't seem to be done with number 2 yet.

So let's not blame feminism for this. The slogan about potential rapists is one I haven't heard for about 30 years so I doubt it's highly influential today. And a rapist is not a paedophile so the connection doesn't really make sense anyway. The paranoia about paedophiles comes from other sources.

There has to be another option other than either having a hardcoded master password or being unable to help customers back in once they mess up.

If you've messed up the device a physical hard reset button would do the trick. But it would be a pain for anyone who just forgot a password and doesn't want to lose settings.

So how about a physical "reset my password" button? Press it and the next time you connect over the LAN it forces you to choose a new password, but doesn't erase your settings. Wouldn't that work and eliminate the need for a hardcoded master password?

Disclaimer: I may fall into your "nerd" category. But I still like devices that just work without 8 hours of setup.

kleinbl00  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I've got a couple Netgear Nighthawks. One of them is running Advanced Tomato.

If I want to get in to the Netgear firmware using an admin password, I have to hit a button. If I want to get into Advanced Tomato, I don't.

I don't need to hit a button to install Advanced Tomato over the Netgear.

And I'm not an expert. I'm a dude who can follow directions. I, too, like devices that just work without 8 hours of setup - but generally, those are the ones that IT guys slag on you for running.

If this prompts enough warranty claims maybe the manufacturers will gain an incentive to improve security on their devices?

kleinbl00  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It's literally the difference between having a password to get your customers into their routers when they fuck up and forget their own and not.

rrrrr  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

There has to be another option other than either having a hardcoded master password or being unable to help customers back in once they mess up.

If you've messed up the device a physical hard reset button would do the trick. But it would be a pain for anyone who just forgot a password and doesn't want to lose settings.

So how about a physical "reset my password" button? Press it and the next time you connect over the LAN it forces you to choose a new password, but doesn't erase your settings. Wouldn't that work and eliminate the need for a hardcoded master password?

Disclaimer: I may fall into your "nerd" category. But I still like devices that just work without 8 hours of setup.

kleinbl00  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I've got a couple Netgear Nighthawks. One of them is running Advanced Tomato.

If I want to get in to the Netgear firmware using an admin password, I have to hit a button. If I want to get into Advanced Tomato, I don't.

I don't need to hit a button to install Advanced Tomato over the Netgear.

And I'm not an expert. I'm a dude who can follow directions. I, too, like devices that just work without 8 hours of setup - but generally, those are the ones that IT guys slag on you for running.

rrrrr  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Anyone using the Brave browser?

Absolutely. These are questions, not reasons to give up on the project. I hope they can make it work.

rrrrr  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Anyone using the Brave browser?

They want users to pay an amount of money that they will then share among themselves, the website owners, and suppliers of non-intrusive ads.

rrrrr  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Anyone using the Brave browser?

I use it and I like it. It's fast and the user interface is nice and clear. And I like having ads and trackers blocked by default. And I like that it's open source. Brave is the browser I go to when Firefox is acting buggy. However, it doesn't support any extensions, which can be a pain.

But I have some doubts about their business model, which is basically to have users pay some money that gets distributed among the websites they visit, based on the amount of traffic they give to each site. The aim is to give the site owners a way to make money that doesn't depend on intrusive ads, and thereby to improve the quality of the web. Meanwhile, Brave takes a cut of the payments so they can stay in business.

It's a noble enough goal, but I wonder about the practicalities of it.

Firstly, buying bitcoin: I tried setting up their Brave Payments and got bogged down in the process of trying to buy Bitcoin. After a couple of attempts I decided it was too time consuming and I'd have to do it when I had a spare hour or two. This is a disincentive. (As is having your wallet managed by some site you have no reason to trust.) They need a more frictionless payment system if people are going to buy in.

Secondly, how are they going to pay the website owners? How do you track down and pay every owner of every website out there? How do you verify you're paying the real owner of the site? Grooveshark was a great music sharing site that promised to pay the rights owners based on the music you listened to, but they got shut down for not keeping up with payments. I don't know whether Grooveshark were acting in good faith but perhaps they did intend to pay, only to find the world of music licensing overwhelmingly complex. Others (Spotify, etc.) have kind of resolved the issue but only by giving too much power and money to middlepeople, while the actual content makers get squeezed. How complex is "pay everyone who owns a website"? Will we end up with a proliferation of website payment clearing houses, website rights management agencies, etc.? But maybe Brave has smart people working on this.

Thirdly, what happens when other browsers emerge using the same business model? Do they each set up independent payment systems for website owners? Do website owners have to deal with each browser maker individually? Do browsers then start to compete to get website owners to use their payments system and not their competitors', and to drive traffic towards their browser? Remember each browser maker takes a cut of the revenue. What then are the ramifications of this as it plays out across the web? When happens when one browser gets a market lead? Do you then have to use (and pay) that browser to see all the most popular websites? It seems like we could end up with something like Net Non-Neutrality Hell only with the browser rather than the intertubes.

Fourthly, isn't there way more money in amassing and selling information on users' habits than there is in one-off micropayments for content producers? Ad networks are partly about the ads and partly about the tracking. User profiling seems to be where the money's at these days (witness Microsoft charging you for Windows then using it go gather a ton of data about you). Faced with the choice of ads and trackers or micropayments and no ads or trackers, won't many websites simply choose the former because it's more lucrative?

I'm not a business person and maybe these aren't insurmountable difficulties. But I do wonder how viable the model is.

mk  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I agree that these are all good questions. Brave is moving from Bitcoin to Ethereum, and they are going to be using a token called the BAT or basic attention token. I'm not sure if it will make the experience better or worse. There seems to be a number of approaches to get crypto into the browser (like the metamask extension, or dApp browsers like Mist). Who knows if this approach will work. At least they have a lot of experience behind them.

Content has been polluted by ads. I'm willing to support experimenting with new models.

rrrrr  ·  58 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Absolutely. These are questions, not reasons to give up on the project. I hope they can make it work.

rrrrr  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I think Dick Cheney would sound like this on mescaline and amyl nitrate.

Halfway through the video. I'm starting to panic. My world is crumbling, I can't find solid ground. Or is it my mind? Is this how Alzheimer's feels?

Stopped the video. Turns out, it was her.

kleinbl00  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Fortunately we didn't elect her.

cries in beer

rrrrr  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I think Dick Cheney would sound like this on mescaline and amyl nitrate.

    You know because of a couple of them said, "He didn't call them a currency manipulator." Well, for two reasons. Number One, he's not, since my time. You know, very specific formula. You would think it's like generalities, it's not. They have — they've actually — their currency's gone up. So it's a very, very specific formula. And I said, "How badly have they been," ... they said, "Since you got to office they have not manipulated their currency." That's Number One, but much more important, they are working with us on North Korea. Now maybe that'll work out or maybe it won't. Can you imagine? ...

Well that's... reassuring?

It's painful to read this interview. Trump knows how to bully people by talking relentless nonsense.

The other day some random guy came up to me and started talking about how he had been on a team that invented the microcomputer. And about some secret satellites that he claimed to know by name, because he worked on some tech around their launch. I was thinking "maybe he's crazy, or maybe there's a grain of truth in it, or maybe he's a smart guy who has fallen on hard times." I didn't want to dismiss him out of hand. Talking to him for a few minutes I felt like some of the things he said were maybe true, others were elaborations, others were invented. But I couldn't quite tell which was which. So I felt at a disadvantage because I couldn't really give an honest response to anything. In the circumstances you're not an equal participant. You smile and nod when you can, you try to keep listening, you're on guard for inadvertently nodding to something outrageous. You can't fact-check on the spot. You can't relate any of the conversation to anything that exists in your world. If you try, he takes your point and runs with it right back into his jungle of confusingness. I guess that's what they call "gaslighting". So I get the same feeling off Trump as I did off this guy, except with the addition of feeling bullied. The guy I met wasn't malicious as far as I could tell, just in a world slightly more of his own making than usual. But at some level Trump knows what he's doing; however unconsciously, this is strategic for him - it's a weaponized form of rambling nonsense, from a guy who's now in charge of everything.

kleinbl00  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·  

rrrrr  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Halfway through the video. I'm starting to panic. My world is crumbling, I can't find solid ground. Or is it my mind? Is this how Alzheimer's feels?

Stopped the video. Turns out, it was her.

kleinbl00  ·  59 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Fortunately we didn't elect her.

cries in beer

rrrrr  ·  63 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Human Mealworm says there's no scandal forcing him from office

    I’ve been given more enemas by more people over the last eight years than you can possibly imagine.

Until now I hadn't even thought to imagine. I want my old life back.