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comment by user-inactivated

We watched a lecture by Alan Guth explaining the ins and outs of his inflation theory (read the criticisms of the theory, they're just as interesting as the theory itself). I have almost no idea what was going on, but somehow I still felt impressed by what he had to say. During his lecture though, I came to two conclusions. One, there is way too much math in physics. Someone should really take care of that. Two, lectures can never have too many charts and illustrations. They really do make things easier to understand, especially if you're not understanding much to begin with.




Devac  ·  200 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If you have some specific questions I could attempt answering them. Same goes for Dala or anyone else who's interested.

    One, there is way too much math in physics. Someone should really take care of that.

Try looking through older books on physics on varius subjects. For example, here's History and root of the principle of the conservation of energy by Ernst Mach. It's a solid work in physics with maybe a one equation that requires calculus and it's there just to illustrate how much information is hidden in it, provided you speak the language (mathematics). Seriously, knowing maths cuts down so much time from learning physics that it's not even funny.

For more modern take on physics, I can recommend Road to Reality by Roger Penrose as one of the more intuitive books on modern mathematics and physics. While it's not a textbook, it doesn't shy away from showing a whole lot of 'mathematical squiggles'. However, it takes you gently from concepts like adding numbers (and what it means to construct addition) or constructing geometrical figures on a plane up to twistor theory. If possible, check it out in a library to see if it speaks to you.