Losing faith in God in the 21st century is an anachronistic experience. You end up contending with the kinds of things the west dealt with more than a hundred years ago: materialism, the end of history, the death of the soul. When I think back on that period of my life, what I recall most viscerally is an unnamable sense of dread. There were days I woke in a panic, certain that I’d lost some essential part of myself in the fume of a blackout, and would work my fingers across my nose, my lips, my eyebrows, and my ears until I assured myself that everything was intact. My body had become strange to me; it seemed insubstantial. I went out of my way to avoid subway grates because I believed I could slip through them. One morning, on the train home from work, I became convinced that my flesh was melting into the seat.

    Transhumanists, in their eagerness to preempt charges of dualism, tend to sound an awful lot like...early church fathers. Eric Steinhart, a “digitalist” philosopher at William Paterson University, is among the transhumanists who insist the resurrection must be physical. “Uploading does not aim to leave the flesh behind,” he writes, “on the contrary, it aims at the intensification of the flesh.” The irony is that transhumanists are arguing these questions as though they were the first to consider them. Their discussions give no indication that these debates belong to a theological tradition that stretches back to the earliest centuries of the Common Era.


Devac:

    Finally, he leaned in and rested his elbows on the table, his demeanour markedly pastoral, and began speaking about the transfiguration and the nature of Christ. Jesus, he reminded me, was both fully human and fully God. What was interesting, he said, was that science had actually verified the potential for matter to have two distinct natures. Superposition, a principle in quantum theory, suggests that an object can be in two places at one time. A photon could be a particle, and it could also be a wave. It could have two natures. “When Jesus tells us that if we have faith nothing will be impossible for us, I think he means that literally.”

So, just to add a thing regarding this bit: one of the very important assertions in quantum theory is that you can't have an instance that will simultaneously show that a photon (or any other particle for that matter) exhibit both corpuscular and wave properties. It's an 'exclusive or' (XOR) kind of deal. Perhaps I'm missing a point of the analogy, but in this case it should have been "Christ's nature was both fully human and fully divine until he has done something that fitted either of those natures".

I know, pedantic to the extreme. Sorry, I'm just kinda tired of the topic itself and my nature of a killjoy is the one you can observe. :P


posted by lm: 631 days ago