In 1950 ... Edward Nevin had been recovering from a prostate surgery when he suddenly fell ill with a severe urinary-tract infection containing Serratia marcescens, the theoretically harmless bacterium that's known for turning bread red in color. The bacteria had reportedly never been found in the hospital before and was rare in the Bay Area (and in California in general).

    The bacteria spread to Nevin's heart and he died a few weeks later.

    Another 10 patients showed up in the hospital over the next few months, all with pneumonia symptoms and the odd presence of Serratia marcescens. They all recovered.

    Nevin's grandson tried to sue the government for wrongful death, but the court held that the government was immune to a lawsuit for negligence and that they were justified in conducting tests without subjects' knowledge.



Super_Cyan:

    Nevin's grandson tried to sue the government for wrongful death, but the court held that the government was immune to a lawsuit for negligence and that they were justified in conducting tests without subjects' knowledge.

That's just messed up. The government knew that what they were doing was wrong, yet they didn't own up to it. Really, a government that has trillions of dollars and regularly funds things for billions of dollars couldn't have just given him some compensation and moved on? Even if he went balls-to-the wall and asked for like $10 million for his grandfather's death, it would haven't even touched the other $1.18 trillion that the government spent in 1977. It seems like if a country is going to test biological weapons on its populace, accepting a lawsuit for a resulting death is the least that they could do.

When I hear conspiracy theories, I usually think they're bullshit, but stuff like this makes me at least consider them.


posted by rrrrr: 1255 days ago