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demure  ·  38 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Nukin' the spammers

Dude, that user just posted on one of my posts. I'd feel bad if it's actually a person, but the responses are so Markov-chain / quotes-from-online-sources -esque

tacocat  ·  38 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Here's one of the accounts that shared it.

https://hubski.com/user/Polar_Bear

demure  ·  41 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 10, 2019

That's awesome. This is the same kid who figured out negative numbers without being taught, yeah?

That's awesome.

demure  ·  41 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 10, 2019

I ran my first half marathon (ever) on Sunday! It was grand. A flat course (650 ft over 13 miles--flat enough) and coastal weather made for a wonderful run.

The weather was good--low 60s the entire time, with the sun peeking through the clouds towards the last third. Since it was in a coastal town, the air was nice and refreshing as well. Decent number of water stations, fairly well marked course (although I was disappointed to learn that they didn't close the roads and we ran in the bike lane as a few folks occasionally drove by).

While my Fitbit didn't start capturing GPS data right away (grr) at least I have Strava data (GPS, sans heartrate) for the run.

I ran a 1:56:16, which more than met my target of 1:59:59. Very pleased.

demure  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 3, 2019

There are two PZM mics mounted on the top of the (wooden) playing cabin. Presumably that means more to you than it does to me--but I was told that it's because they're PZM that they can be mounted so close to the bells...

kleinbl00  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·  

PZM means "Pressure Zone Microphone"(microphone - yeah). Their pattern is "everything" and they only work on a boundary.

If you wanted to hear what the carillon sounds like inside the carillon that's the way to go. If you wanted to get the sound inside where you play it, that's a great way to do it.

Generally you want to get the sound of the acoustic space where people are hearing the performance. With the massive church organs, the answer is obviously "inside the church." But hey. Take what you can get.

demure  ·  45 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 3, 2019

I'll do my best when I'm abroad--those recordings will probably be mediocre.

Hopefully soon I have some nice recordings from my home tower. We've got a mic (maybe two, i.e. stereo? not sure) in the belfry, positioned to get higher quality recordings.

It'd be dope to do a surround recording. But we have a small budget.

demure  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 3, 2019

Dang, is there some obscure world that you haven't at least glimpsed into?

I looked into Olympic Carillon a bit since I hadn't heard of them before. Usually when talking about carillons one talks about the foundry that made the bells--which OC doesn't do. But still, the rest of the parts of building a carillon that aren't about casting tons of metal are also extremely important to the overall character of an instrument like that. Things like positioning of the treble bells, for example, which are several orders of magnitude (!) smaller than the largest bass bells, can have a large effect on how the instrument sounds to folks listening on the ground.

Before this trip, I'll have played carillons with bells cast by Gillett and Johnston, Taylor, and Paccard. After this trip, I'll be adding Hemony, Eijsbouts, de Haze, and Petit & Fritsen, with the oldest bells being Hemony bells from 1651!

edit: Holy shit Olympic Carillon did a renovation of the carillon at Riverside Church in New York City. Riverside's carillon has the heaviest tuned bell in the world as its bourdon (nearly 41,000 lbs)

kleinbl00  ·  45 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Let's keep our eye on the ball here: I've talked to people who have built carillons. Twice. You've got a hitlist. ;-)

Any chance you could record some of this? 'cuz that would be amazing to hear. Not as amazing as hearing it in person for painfully obvious acoustical reasons but still...

Damn - anyone ever done a surround or ambisonic recording of a carillon?

demure  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·  

There are two PZM mics mounted on the top of the (wooden) playing cabin. Presumably that means more to you than it does to me--but I was told that it's because they're PZM that they can be mounted so close to the bells...

kleinbl00  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·  

PZM means "Pressure Zone Microphone"(microphone - yeah). Their pattern is "everything" and they only work on a boundary.

If you wanted to hear what the carillon sounds like inside the carillon that's the way to go. If you wanted to get the sound inside where you play it, that's a great way to do it.

Generally you want to get the sound of the acoustic space where people are hearing the performance. With the massive church organs, the answer is obviously "inside the church." But hey. Take what you can get.

demure  ·  45 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'll do my best when I'm abroad--those recordings will probably be mediocre.

Hopefully soon I have some nice recordings from my home tower. We've got a mic (maybe two, i.e. stereo? not sure) in the belfry, positioned to get higher quality recordings.

It'd be dope to do a surround recording. But we have a small budget.

demure  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 3, 2019

No, but I'm thinking of checking that museum out!

I'll be visiting at least four, two in Alkmaar (Grote Kerk and the Waagcarillon at Waagplein) and two in Utrecht (Domcarillon at Domplein and the carillon at Nicolaïtoren), and playing on at least 3.

demure  ·  47 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 3, 2019

there are so many exciting wonderful things happening in my life right now

in no particular order:

- tickets bought to visit a bunch of countries i've never been before (france, belgium, the netherlands) in may

- i'll see my dear friend who's studying abroad in france

- i'll meet veen for the first time

- i've been able to arrange a couple of performance/visit opportunities at some carillons in the netherlands! which is an amazing privilege and i'm so excited! these instruments are amazing--certainly the oldest instruments i'll have ever played. some of the bells date back to the 15th century!

- i've finally figured out what i'll be doing this summer! interning at google should be fun!

- i'm running my first half marathon on sunday!

- there's another spacex falcon heavy mission launching soon!

kleinbl00  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I did an internship in a tiny town in WA state one summer and would occasionally hear pealing from the warehouse next door. Wander over one day and they're legit-no-shit carillon makers. I asked what the odds were of ending up next to a carillon shop and they said "well, there are only a couple on the planet..."

Fast forward fifteen years and we're selling my wife's oboe to an instrument broker in a different tiny town in WA state. The broker and I keep looking at each other and finally I say "I think I know you from somewhere" and he says "not unless you're in the carillon business."

The New Zealand bells in the article? They were making 'em while I was there, I think. The timing is right and I didn't get the sense that they moved a lot of product. Hell of a thing to hear without context.

demure  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Dang, is there some obscure world that you haven't at least glimpsed into?

I looked into Olympic Carillon a bit since I hadn't heard of them before. Usually when talking about carillons one talks about the foundry that made the bells--which OC doesn't do. But still, the rest of the parts of building a carillon that aren't about casting tons of metal are also extremely important to the overall character of an instrument like that. Things like positioning of the treble bells, for example, which are several orders of magnitude (!) smaller than the largest bass bells, can have a large effect on how the instrument sounds to folks listening on the ground.

Before this trip, I'll have played carillons with bells cast by Gillett and Johnston, Taylor, and Paccard. After this trip, I'll be adding Hemony, Eijsbouts, de Haze, and Petit & Fritsen, with the oldest bells being Hemony bells from 1651!

edit: Holy shit Olympic Carillon did a renovation of the carillon at Riverside Church in New York City. Riverside's carillon has the heaviest tuned bell in the world as its bourdon (nearly 41,000 lbs)

kleinbl00  ·  45 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Let's keep our eye on the ball here: I've talked to people who have built carillons. Twice. You've got a hitlist. ;-)

Any chance you could record some of this? 'cuz that would be amazing to hear. Not as amazing as hearing it in person for painfully obvious acoustical reasons but still...

Damn - anyone ever done a surround or ambisonic recording of a carillon?

demure  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·  

There are two PZM mics mounted on the top of the (wooden) playing cabin. Presumably that means more to you than it does to me--but I was told that it's because they're PZM that they can be mounted so close to the bells...

kleinbl00  ·  43 days ago  ·  link  ·  

PZM means "Pressure Zone Microphone"(microphone - yeah). Their pattern is "everything" and they only work on a boundary.

If you wanted to hear what the carillon sounds like inside the carillon that's the way to go. If you wanted to get the sound inside where you play it, that's a great way to do it.

Generally you want to get the sound of the acoustic space where people are hearing the performance. With the massive church organs, the answer is obviously "inside the church." But hey. Take what you can get.

demure  ·  45 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'll do my best when I'm abroad--those recordings will probably be mediocre.

Hopefully soon I have some nice recordings from my home tower. We've got a mic (maybe two, i.e. stereo? not sure) in the belfry, positioned to get higher quality recordings.

It'd be dope to do a surround recording. But we have a small budget.

spencerflem  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·  

No way, is the carillon at the speelklok museum? Ever since watching Wintergatan's videos I've always wanted to check it out. Have a dope trip!

demure  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·  

No, but I'm thinking of checking that museum out!

I'll be visiting at least four, two in Alkmaar (Grote Kerk and the Waagcarillon at Waagplein) and two in Utrecht (Domcarillon at Domplein and the carillon at Nicolaïtoren), and playing on at least 3.

veen  ·  46 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It's not in Museum Speelklok anymore, it was only there in 2017. (Sadly...)

Sorry, this comment is private.
Sorry, this comment is private.
demure  ·  55 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Nukin' the spammers

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demure  ·  84 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Rise of the WeWorking Class

    What's interesting here though is that "shitty life/work balance" is WeWork's implicit product... and I hadn't seen it put so starkly before. Because really, they're taking the shitty "have a kombucha now get back to the galley and row, slave" aspect of working in tech and offering it up for rent. They're offering it up to you, as an individual "entrepreneur", and they're offering it up to your company, as a way of literally outsourcing their culture. Most everyone else has been pointing out that WeWork is basically a rental middleman, adding a layer of techy bullshit to existing leases and skimming off the top.

Exactly--right on the nose. Glad you took another look.

    And 20 years from now, when we're all mocking the shit out of the terrible ideas of the teens, I sincerely hope we've come to our senses about what a terrible idea all this is.

Hear hear.

demure  ·  84 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Rise of the WeWorking Class

The steady march towards work-is-life, life-in-work concerns me, even as I take part in the problem...

"Job stability" -> "Office drone" -> Office Space

"New wave" -> open office plans, company culture -> Google, IDEO, Silicon Valley

"The hustle" -> gig economy, independent contractors -> Uber, Instacart

"The hustle 2.0" -> company culture but you don't work always work for a company (or that company lacks the former) -> WeWork

    When I met McKelvey a few weeks later at WeWork’s Manhattan headquarters, he made it clear that the long-term plan was not just to make IBM a bit more like Google but something much more grandiose. The company’s CultureOS was about being “supportive to openness and conversation” and the “obligation we create to each other to be good humans to each other — to share a smile and some warmth.” We’ve learned the hard way from social media, he said, that “alignment along ideological lines is a shallow way of creating a human environment.” This, McKelvey said, is what he tells his team: “You’re not building work space. You’re here building a new infrastructure to rebuild social fabric and rebuild up the potential for human connection.” It was, he conceded, a “big leap.” But the company existed to give it a shot. “Who am I going to need in a disaster? The person I took a yoga class with versus the person I’m in the same Facebook group with?” The enterprise product could scale up that social infrastructure to unite millions and millions of people. On a hard-hat tour of WeWork’s new West Coast headquarters, in San Francisco’s Salesforce Tower, Adam Neumann told me: “Assuming we keep up our personal growth as a company, as individuals and as a company, there is no limit. Businesses, neighborhoods, cities — there are new cities being built around the world, and we want the call from those cities.”

Company/work culture as culture culture. Frightening.

kleinbl00  ·  84 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Thanks for encouraging me to give it another look. I think the tone of the article threw me off; the author is ambivalent, but not in a "I'm not buying this" sort of way but in a "I'm not sure if I should say nice things or mean things so I'll kind of split the difference" sort of way.

Your work-is-life, life-in-work concern is valid. What's interesting here though is that "shitty life/work balance" is WeWork's implicit product... and I hadn't seen it put so starkly before. Because really, they're taking the shitty "have a kombucha now get back to the galley and row, slave" aspect of working in tech and offering it up for rent. They're offering it up to you, as an individual "entrepreneur", and they're offering it up to your company, as a way of literally outsourcing their culture. Most everyone else has been pointing out that WeWork is basically a rental middleman, adding a layer of techy bullshit to existing leases and skimming off the top. This is an argument that really, they're a security blanket for people who need to feel like they have a job even when they don't.

My wife had an office in eOffices. They've been around for 20 years. They own a building and they charge you month-to-month for everything WeWork will sell you... minus the "craft on draft" and "fresh fruitwater" and "micro-roasted coffee." But they lease offices. Month-to-month. And that's probably why they're three buildings on the west side of Los Angeles rather than some $47b fuckercorn. 'cuz hey. They can't get people to pay them $50 a day for a desk.

Because you're right: they're pushing the idea that you just can't work for yourself without some fuckhead encouraging you to wear Hawaiian shirts every other thursday or some shit. And they're charging through the nose. And 20 years from now, when we're all mocking the shit out of the terrible ideas of the teens, I sincerely hope we've come to our senses about what a terrible idea all this is.

demure  ·  84 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    What's interesting here though is that "shitty life/work balance" is WeWork's implicit product... and I hadn't seen it put so starkly before. Because really, they're taking the shitty "have a kombucha now get back to the galley and row, slave" aspect of working in tech and offering it up for rent. They're offering it up to you, as an individual "entrepreneur", and they're offering it up to your company, as a way of literally outsourcing their culture. Most everyone else has been pointing out that WeWork is basically a rental middleman, adding a layer of techy bullshit to existing leases and skimming off the top.

Exactly--right on the nose. Glad you took another look.

    And 20 years from now, when we're all mocking the shit out of the terrible ideas of the teens, I sincerely hope we've come to our senses about what a terrible idea all this is.

Hear hear.