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Saydrah's comments
Saydrah  ·  1609 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Humans will land on Mars by 2026: Elon Musk

Hey! BTW mk your notification emails are consistently getting spammed in Zimbra -- good fortune I checked my junk on a whim today.

I'm in LA, working for the first time since 2009 at a purpose-driven company, and it feels great. I'm a person who can derive a greater purpose from almost anything (a lawyer friend told me once, "You must believe your client to be a good advocate," and I took that to heart along with Indra Nooyi's advice on assuming positive intentions) but it's great to be in a place where everyone is on that page. I've found it very easy to live in LA so far. The weather is of course so fantastic that people poke fun at it for being so great all the time. The people are friendly. (Really, they are. LA stereotypes have been exaggerated significantly.) There's always something to do. ALWAYS.

Having a blast. But busy as hell growing a community of my own, so I've only been around others sparingly!

mk  ·  1609 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Thanks, Saydrah.

I'm glad to hear that things are going well for you in LA. If we have a meetup out there, I am going to give you a shoutout.

thenewgreen  ·  1609 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hey! Back at ya. That was a nice surprise to hear from you Saydrah. It's evident from your comment that you are happy and doing well. Being a part of a "purpose driven company," that you can "believe in" seems to make all the difference.

Good luck building that community.

I have to ask (because I always do), how is your uncle doing with the bees?

Saydrah  ·  1899 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: There is no bee crisis

As far as I know there really has been a change in the lifetime of most beekeepers. That's what I hear from my uncle and from all the other beekeepers I know. That doesn't mean there haven't ever been other colony collapse events in history, but there have also been other volcano explosions in history and that fact wouldn't keep us from worrying about an erupting volcano in our backyards today, would it?

thenewgreen  ·  1898 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    there have also been other volcano explosions in history and that fact wouldn't keep us from worrying about an erupting volcano in our backyards today, would it?
-No, and I wouldn't suggest otherwise. However, if it were as simple as it being a natural, cyclical event I'd feel much more at ease. It's often hard to tell where the media fear mongering and the actual data lie.
Saydrah  ·  2002 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What is the smartest thing to do with twenty dollars?

Detailed origami. You have to be very smart to be good at rectangular origami. (Or have a lot of time on your hands.)

relevant_thing  ·  2001 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Especially with uncreaseable cotton paper from the Treasury. And RoseArt. (Are jokes frowned upon here? Not thoughtful enough?)

mk  ·  2001 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Jokes are fine. But people expect a balance.

Saydrah  ·  2009 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Is there anything to do in Austin, TX on a Saturday afternoon?

Who the what?

thenewgreen  ·  2009 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ha. Sorry if it was confusing. I was just giving credit where it was due. I have occasionally used the #tellhubski tag and flagamuffin said he sourced it from me and I definitely picked it up from a post that you made. -Hence the via Saydrah.

Hope you are doing well.

Saydrah  ·  2084 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I saw a car accident and I stopped

Spontaneously? Almost never. Once in third grade when my teacher had a grand mal seizure during a lesson and conked his head on the blackboard. I got a pair of box turtles from my parents as a reward for having the presence of mind to go for the school nurse while the rest of the class was still panicking and milling in circles. They lived for ten years after that, not the 50+ I had hoped for, but they were probably wild-caught as adults, so that wasn't so bad. One of them might still be alive out in the wild somewhere -- he didn't come up from hibernation one year and I don't know if he died or escaped.

Other than that, a lot of planning goes into "spontaneous" moments like that for me. I spent 8 years volunteering intensively for an animal rescue group, including 3 years on the BoD. Went on a lot of cruelty calls. Called a lot of emergency vets. Occasionally grabbed a panicking horse before it hurt someone. Now I'm a victim advocate. I spend most on-call nights hoping the pager doesn't go off because I really don't want to be bothered in the moment, but when it does I always wind up glad that I was called, because I get to really help people.

Saydrah  ·  2085 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Jobs Are Never Coming Back

Marx figured this out a long time ago. He was a damn good diagnostician but made lousy prescriptions.

Saydrah  ·  2100 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Elon Musk vs. The Times: Why This Can't End Well for Tesla

I would still cut a bitch for a Tesla Model S. (Or spend a moderate amount of money on one when my current vehicle expires, which is more likely.) I don't care how many NYT writers pan it. It's a fucking Tesla that I can afford. I am getting one.

Saydrah  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Public comments considered harmful : Fred Ross

I gave it some thought on the way home, and I have swayed a bit more to your perspective, but I still think that a good attitude is a trait that it's simply lazy for any person who presents materials to the public not to cultivate. If you're SO brilliant that you really truly don't need to be liked, okay, but most people (even most brilliant people) are not. However, I acknowledge that the value of his work, though not best served by his presentation, is not itself affected by his presentation.

The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

I agree with this. To me it seems like he's just now learning how to interact with people on the internet, and was surprised by the sheer volume of shitposting that happens in public.

Of course once you scale up past a certain size, private messages become useless too.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Public comments considered harmful : Fred Ross

If one has that perspective on one's audience, one should probably not release materials intended to be persuasive to an online audience, which by definition cannot be hand-selected.

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Alternatively, strike a balance in which you release material publicly but only engage in discussion with those who seem capable of understanding the things you say instead of getting caught up in the way you say them.

Which is exactly what the author of this article is doing. Which everyone must do to some degree, considering the one-to-many communication model of the internet is capable of generating massive audiences that are infeasible to engage with on an individual level (as you mentioned). If you respond to any member of that audience on an individual level, you have effectively hand-selected a member of your audience to participate in discussion.

edit: i think he goes too far in claiming that public comments are harmful. i would say that public comments simply tend to encourages the kind of response he does not find interesting, and that personal email has a higher signal/noise ratio.

Saydrah  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I gave it some thought on the way home, and I have swayed a bit more to your perspective, but I still think that a good attitude is a trait that it's simply lazy for any person who presents materials to the public not to cultivate. If you're SO brilliant that you really truly don't need to be liked, okay, but most people (even most brilliant people) are not. However, I acknowledge that the value of his work, though not best served by his presentation, is not itself affected by his presentation.

The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

I agree with this. To me it seems like he's just now learning how to interact with people on the internet, and was surprised by the sheer volume of shitposting that happens in public.

Of course once you scale up past a certain size, private messages become useless too.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Public comments considered harmful : Fred Ross

Well, because it affects how people receive your work, if part of your work is making a positive change by influencing others in some way. I have a shitty attitude a lot of the time and criticism of it has helped me grow. (And helped me make the decision to actually finally quit Reddit, with the exception of one novelty account I keep around for giggles.)

user-inactivated  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If some people are incapable of digesting substance without a sugary coating of style then perhaps they aren't worth engaging.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If one has that perspective on one's audience, one should probably not release materials intended to be persuasive to an online audience, which by definition cannot be hand-selected.

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Alternatively, strike a balance in which you release material publicly but only engage in discussion with those who seem capable of understanding the things you say instead of getting caught up in the way you say them.

Which is exactly what the author of this article is doing. Which everyone must do to some degree, considering the one-to-many communication model of the internet is capable of generating massive audiences that are infeasible to engage with on an individual level (as you mentioned). If you respond to any member of that audience on an individual level, you have effectively hand-selected a member of your audience to participate in discussion.

edit: i think he goes too far in claiming that public comments are harmful. i would say that public comments simply tend to encourages the kind of response he does not find interesting, and that personal email has a higher signal/noise ratio.

Saydrah  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I gave it some thought on the way home, and I have swayed a bit more to your perspective, but I still think that a good attitude is a trait that it's simply lazy for any person who presents materials to the public not to cultivate. If you're SO brilliant that you really truly don't need to be liked, okay, but most people (even most brilliant people) are not. However, I acknowledge that the value of his work, though not best served by his presentation, is not itself affected by his presentation.

The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

I agree with this. To me it seems like he's just now learning how to interact with people on the internet, and was surprised by the sheer volume of shitposting that happens in public.

Of course once you scale up past a certain size, private messages become useless too.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Public comments considered harmful : Fred Ross

I like how he's rebutting criticism of his attitude by declaring that it could not possibly be valid and that criticism of his attitude and style are inherently harmful. It really speaks well of his personality, ego, and attitude that he is so hostile to criticism, no? However, I agree that the article link is quite useful.

JTHipster  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

To be fair to the author,, and having not much interest in the original article, when a person reads a rant, the last thing that is useful is talking about a tone.

Intellectual discussion is very much a tone-based discussion since word choice and syntax contribute heavily to how information is communicated. Rants are more personal expression and are designed to communicate information a bit more bluntly.

That being said, its a fascinatingly strange experience to see a person compile a list of their criticisms and responses, then cross check it across sites and present a statistically irrelevant sample to the viewers. Fascinating because it offers some insight in to both the site and the offer and strange because the amount of time spent on that chart could be used to do something more productive.

user-inactivated  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

How is criticism of attitude, tone, or style productive in any way? It's the kind of thing that people do when they don't actually have anything substantive to say.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Well, because it affects how people receive your work, if part of your work is making a positive change by influencing others in some way. I have a shitty attitude a lot of the time and criticism of it has helped me grow. (And helped me make the decision to actually finally quit Reddit, with the exception of one novelty account I keep around for giggles.)

user-inactivated  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If some people are incapable of digesting substance without a sugary coating of style then perhaps they aren't worth engaging.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If one has that perspective on one's audience, one should probably not release materials intended to be persuasive to an online audience, which by definition cannot be hand-selected.

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Alternatively, strike a balance in which you release material publicly but only engage in discussion with those who seem capable of understanding the things you say instead of getting caught up in the way you say them.

Which is exactly what the author of this article is doing. Which everyone must do to some degree, considering the one-to-many communication model of the internet is capable of generating massive audiences that are infeasible to engage with on an individual level (as you mentioned). If you respond to any member of that audience on an individual level, you have effectively hand-selected a member of your audience to participate in discussion.

edit: i think he goes too far in claiming that public comments are harmful. i would say that public comments simply tend to encourages the kind of response he does not find interesting, and that personal email has a higher signal/noise ratio.

Saydrah  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I gave it some thought on the way home, and I have swayed a bit more to your perspective, but I still think that a good attitude is a trait that it's simply lazy for any person who presents materials to the public not to cultivate. If you're SO brilliant that you really truly don't need to be liked, okay, but most people (even most brilliant people) are not. However, I acknowledge that the value of his work, though not best served by his presentation, is not itself affected by his presentation.

The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

user-inactivated  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The thing that sticks in my craw is his need to announce that he thinks comments are harmful and that he won't participate. Just don't participate next time, guy. Nobody's waiting with bated breath for ya!

I agree with this. To me it seems like he's just now learning how to interact with people on the internet, and was surprised by the sheer volume of shitposting that happens in public.

Of course once you scale up past a certain size, private messages become useless too.

thenewgreen  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Sometimes you can't see forest for the trees, meaning that this may seem benign on its own, but once this type of writing becomes more and more pervasive, is something lost? I would be curious to know which of the two comments he perceived as negative? I'm not saying there aren't 2, perhaps there's more? It's just such a subjective thing.

I did like the linked post and again should mention that Fred was very kind in his letter to me and offered to respond to users via email if they wanted to reach out to him. An offer that I would guess stands.

Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Dumping Your Girlfriend with Economics

Should have waited to post this on Valentine's Day :)

flagamuffin  ·  2110 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Oh, god, I'm way too impatient for that.

Women sometimes do this thing where they meet an acquaintance, think he's cute, and find opportunities to hang out with him, watch him, and evaluate him as a potential mate. Then presto, by the time they're done evaluating him, he's become integrated into their social group too closely for the girl to be comfortable asking him out because it'd now be awkward if he rejected her and all her friends found out. It's kind of the female equivalent of the stereotype-based-in-fact where men see a beautiful girl and immediately talk themselves into thinking she's out of their league and it'd be the end of the world to get humiliated by a rejection from her, so they might as well not even say two words to her and just keep standing over here awkwardly in this corner.

The annoying thing about the female version is, 99% of the time, the acquaintance-level guy would have accepted a date or at least been totally cordial and flattered if he did have to turn the girl's offer down, and if he then became a friend, it wouldn't be awkward at all--it'd have been just part of the story of how he became a member of the social group.

thenewgreen  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I agree with everything you wrote there. I've experienced these things. Good perceptions.

My wife would never admit to "asking me out", and she's right she didn't literally ask me out. I had a friend from high school named Shannon that was friends with my wife. Shannon had a revelation that I would be the perfect match for her friend "J". I was working at a restaurant at the time and they stopped in unbeknownst to me and "scoped me out". Later that week Shannon called me and asked if I would go on a blind date with her friend? -I politely declined. Then one day Shannon walked in to the restaurant with a gorgeous girl at her side. When the girl at her side was looking away I whispered to Shannon "is that the girl"? She whispered back "yes".

My face lit up and I whispered "I'm in" and gave a thumbs up. They sat at the bar.

We had "strolling minstrels", a violinist and a guitarist and they agreed to come up behind the girls at the bar and after I shook "J"'s hand start playing "It's now or never". -It was full on cheese, but funny and somewhat endearing.

I asked her out. Best first date ever and we've never looked back. But really... she asked me out first. Just indirectly.

I don't mean to be rude, but is English a second language for you? If so it's much better than my French/Arabic/German/Spanish (I can order food in all those, but that's about it) but I still am having a little trouble understanding what you mean by "advanced." Do you mean like "make a romantic advance," or like "promote?"

In any case, on the subject of girls asking guys out, I always advise that when talking to girls who are having trouble meeting someone. You get a much better-quality dating pool of guys when you ask them than waiting for them to approach you.

vlehto  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

You're not rude at all. I meant a romantic advance. It's kind of unfair to give me any easy points because I'm not native speaker. I've seen native speakers churn out worse English than what I usually do. And Hubski has this handy correction thing too.

And I advice it too all the time. Let's keep up the good work!

thenewgreen  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    You get a much better-quality dating pool of guys when you ask them than waiting for them to approach you.
-That sounds like really great advice for a number of reasons. I know that I would have been really flattered if that had ever happened. -It sort of did happen with my wife.
Saydrah  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Women sometimes do this thing where they meet an acquaintance, think he's cute, and find opportunities to hang out with him, watch him, and evaluate him as a potential mate. Then presto, by the time they're done evaluating him, he's become integrated into their social group too closely for the girl to be comfortable asking him out because it'd now be awkward if he rejected her and all her friends found out. It's kind of the female equivalent of the stereotype-based-in-fact where men see a beautiful girl and immediately talk themselves into thinking she's out of their league and it'd be the end of the world to get humiliated by a rejection from her, so they might as well not even say two words to her and just keep standing over here awkwardly in this corner.

The annoying thing about the female version is, 99% of the time, the acquaintance-level guy would have accepted a date or at least been totally cordial and flattered if he did have to turn the girl's offer down, and if he then became a friend, it wouldn't be awkward at all--it'd have been just part of the story of how he became a member of the social group.

thenewgreen  ·  2111 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I agree with everything you wrote there. I've experienced these things. Good perceptions.

My wife would never admit to "asking me out", and she's right she didn't literally ask me out. I had a friend from high school named Shannon that was friends with my wife. Shannon had a revelation that I would be the perfect match for her friend "J". I was working at a restaurant at the time and they stopped in unbeknownst to me and "scoped me out". Later that week Shannon called me and asked if I would go on a blind date with her friend? -I politely declined. Then one day Shannon walked in to the restaurant with a gorgeous girl at her side. When the girl at her side was looking away I whispered to Shannon "is that the girl"? She whispered back "yes".

My face lit up and I whispered "I'm in" and gave a thumbs up. They sat at the bar.

We had "strolling minstrels", a violinist and a guitarist and they agreed to come up behind the girls at the bar and after I shook "J"'s hand start playing "It's now or never". -It was full on cheese, but funny and somewhat endearing.

I asked her out. Best first date ever and we've never looked back. But really... she asked me out first. Just indirectly.

Saydrah  ·  2114 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What Are You Most Self-Conscious About?

My inability to write "self-conscious" ;)

Sorry, sorry.

Realistically it's mostly my voice. My parents were told I needed surgery and speech therapy when I was five because I always sounded congested and they were convinced I'd get bullied for my voice. That never actually happened in school (kids have a funny way of not realizing something is abnormal when they've been around it since they were in kindergarten) but the damage was done, and it got worse when I got the acting bug in fourth grade and a casting director told me that I could be voice actor "like Chuckie in the Rugrats." He meant it as a compliment, because weird kiddie voices are fungible currency in Hollywood if you also actually know how to do voice acting, but I was crushed.

It's gotten better with age but I still sound unusual and have a slight lisp on top of it because my canine teeth are oversized. (Another thing "helpful" doctors wanted to "fix" because "she'll be bullied" that nobody but me ever bullied me about, in the end.)

I'm an "eat your fear" person, so I got into public speaking and I love it more than anything else now. I still hate my voice, but I love, love, love speaking. And I've even dated guys who tell me I have a sexy voice, SO THERE KINDERGARTEN PEDIATRICIAN. (They're lying, but it's nice of them to try.)

BLOB_CASTLE  ·  2114 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Those in public speaking with unusual voices are the ones who are most remembered I think. Keep at it!