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wasoxygen  ·  365 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 20, 2017x 2

I woke up at 4:30 Saturday morning prepared to do the hardest thing I've ever attempted.

It did not go as planned.

steve  ·  459 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: GOING ON TOUR!

Four miles west of downtown Denver. Super convenient to highways and amenities. PM me if Denver makes sense for your travel schedule. Even if it's just for a lunch stop, hit me up and I'll buy the band lunch.

Edit: screw that - you guys should come stay if possible. We could even do a house show. And your keys player has to show my oldest kid a thing or two.

StJohn  ·  499 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: May 10, 2017

Thank you! I'm glad you're enjoying it.

As for your neighbors, have you tried sending them sexually suggestive gingerbread men in the mail? I am hard-pressed to think of anything that would delight me more than receiving erotic cookies from an anonymous source.

Complexity  ·  817 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: After Brexit Vote, The British Ask Google: 'What is the EU?'

I was there last summer.

To enter, we walked over the border where our passports received a cursory inspection from the British agents. Then we crossed the runway of the airport which cuts perpendicular across the rock. We were told we could cross at any time, just to watch out for landing passenger jets.

And then we were in, immediately confronted by guy with a barely controlled pit bull that was savaging a plastic road bollard, much to his amusement. Ah, a taste of England.

We were thirsty. We found the least objectionable bar beside the dock where the casino-hotel boat is permanently moored and navigated our way through the crowds of touts offering boat tours to see the dolphins. (The strait is a migratory route.)

And we sat and drank cheap beer and stared at a menu that without irony offered beans on toast and listened to the English news and the English football chatter and the quips of the English barman with his dour, self-deprecating humour and we could have closed our eyes and been on the Thames.

There are other pubs around the rock. They are cut-and-paste copies of the sort of beer stained, urine scented, dilapidated, lackadaisically tended drinking holes you'll find in the East of London except unencumbered by the attentive, enthusiastic staff that operate London pubs thanks to a healthy immigrant community. They serve beer, and chips, and scotch eggs.

The old town is a bit like a seaside village, except filled with jewellery shops, electronics goods stores and off-licenses. It's a huge shopping mecca, thanks to the tax breaks. We walked the town for a couple of hours and had seen it all by then.

I had to be there for an appointment later in the week so we decided to tour. You can tour best in the tiny buses that leave from one central point and take around twenty minutes to reach anywhere on the island.

There's one reasonable beach in the north, which serves a hotel. The water is greasy and laps at the shore with apathy. The view is of the shipping lanes. We got into a conversation with a couple who were planning to move there. He was in IT, she was a nurse. They cited the financial incentives, the weather, the smart money that had established financial trading businesses there. He pointed out that huge international gambling businesses operated out of Gibraltar. He was German, she was English. They seemed like a nice couple.

We like walking. We tried walking along the coast from the beach, despite various military notices warning us not to. After five minutes we found we'd reached the impassable tunnel that allows traffic through the north of the rock. There's no way for pedestrians to pass. We turned back.

We thought we should have high tea. We made our way to the colonial hotel, all painted white, perched overlooking the industrial docks. The interior was sumptuous, subdued, staffed by impeccably dressed elder waiters who treated us with the reverence one expects of an establishment found in 1930's india or any fading colonial outpost upheld by a misty-eyed reverence for the past. We had our high tea. Scones, tiny sandwiches, tea in a silver pot. We rounded it off with gin and tonics.

Then the rock. I'm sure you know the history and the military significance and so on. Perhaps you're aware of the modern business models that house financial trading hardware in parts of it. Archeologically it was the last stronghold of the Neanderthal. That's all interesting reading. We took the funicular to the top, in order to make the "breathtaking" descent down the "historically significant" walking paths and we came to know litter, drifting in the wind, catching in the branches of this purported UNESCO world heritage centre. We came to know the plastic bottles tossed beside the path, the piss-reeking military ruins, the unevocative suchness of the place.

And the apes. The poor apes, blinking at the tourists being shuttled up the narrow, switchback roads in taxis which didn't park but just sat, engines burbling, coughing out leaden fumes, as their passengers rolled out and took selfies, and offered the apes the lumps of food under the dozens of signs asking them not to. They're smart, apes. We watched a feckless couple park beside the road, open their trunk to take out a bit of picnic and offer it to the cute ape making eyes at them as several other, powerful members of the troupe concealed in the trees edged closer, sizing up the situation, stalking the open car.

Three days of this, as I waited for my meeting.

In the end, all done, we walked out, alongside the Spanish workers who commute in by foot every day to run the jewellery shops and staff the hotels, alongside the cars of tourists bringing back as much cheap alcohol as they can pack into the trunks of their cars, waved through by the Spanish border control who took more care examining our passports.

It was as if it had never happened. A strange dream of a capsule of the past. It's worth your visiting if only for someone to tell me I misapprehended the place.

b_b  ·  879 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Reef discovered in the mouth of the Amazon River, under the silt

Super cool.

Last week in the New Yorker they had a story about a scientist's quest to cross breed corals (sorry, not sure if it's paywalled) to be acidification and temperature robust. I wonder if these strange new species thriving in crazy conditions will help such efforts.

insomniasexx  ·  1077 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I asked.x 4

Guys. Stop badging this post. Holy shit.

thenewgreen  ·  1124 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: My customers are my friends. Ummm.... NO, THEY'RE NOT!

"I Will" is the first song both my children heard after being born. I sang it to them both. Best song ever.

thenewgreen  ·  1143 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: August 5, 2015

I just accepted an offer for a job selling financial software to large accounting firms. It's what I always dreamed I would do with my life :-)

The compensation is killer, I work from home and I get 4 weeks PTO. Not too shabby, plus I get to learn a whole new vertical. That's cool. I had four offers on the table when I chose this one. One was in the payments space as a Division Manager, one was for a Software Company selling ALLL software to banks, one was selling employee benefits and the other was for a company selling Managed Network Services. I also have a quasi offer from a medical device company (I'm down to the last two, not quite an offer.. .yet) selling Orthopedic surgical equipment.

The company I chose embraces the challenger selling model that I've been using for years, so that's good. The online reviews of working there all say that they value work/life balance -something everyone says they do, but when you see previous employees disparaging other aspects of the company while celebrating that one, it must be true.

There are a lot of people that have been supportive of me during my transition from my current role to this new one. It's not a transition that I would not have made without the "prodding" of my current company. In short, I've been managed out.

Thank you to lil for her help with my resume and keeping my spirits up. Thank you to mk for being a good friend during all this, same with b_b and insomniasexx, steve and flagamuffin. -Among others.

A big shout-out to kleinbl00 who lets me text and vent to him, while he texts back reasoned responses like, "Don't freak out. Conquer." -That was valuable. I feel like I did conquer, thanks.

I learned that there are a lot of opportunities out there for someone with my experience. Some are awful though, so it's important to sift through the chaff and value the good ones.

I begin my new journey on Monday, August 17th.

j4d3  ·  1150 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Map of the US in 1947, from the point of view of Californians
user-inactivated  ·  1165 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The limitations of the moderation systemx 2

if I want to check on them, I can log out and see everything, or perhaps visit their profile specifically.

hubski shouldn't try to facilitate amnesty on behalf of someone whose presence is clearly not wanted.

as it stands, hubski even allows blocked people to send PMs, which is absurd