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sd86




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    I really didn't think you were attempting to give a pass to anyone because I know you.

Thank you for giving me the benefit of a doubt. I honestly and genuinely appreciate that.

    What is the point of this?

It's something I've been thinking about a lot lately and want to explore more. For obvious reasons. I'm not attempting to give a pass to anyone, or to justify or critique anything that's currently going on. Obviously the idea of religion and governance is something that has been with us for a long, long time, and I think it's something that can be analyzed without bringing up politics or current events.

I understand that you're angry. I understand why you're angry. I'm not going to tell you that you can or can't be angry or that your anger is either justified or misplaced. I myself have plenty of thoughts as to what's going on right now and I've made the choice not to share them. I'm not preventing you from sharing yours elsewhere, there are plenty of other opportunities to discuss them, here on Hubski in particular and the world as a whole. I just respectfully ask that this thread be free from current events.

sd86  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: Is a closed ecosystem a monopoly?

Then I think the real question becomes, not whether or not it's a monopoly, but whether or not its still consumer friendly. It's an idea worth exploring.

sd86  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: Is a closed ecosystem a monopoly?

    The reason the Apple ecosystem works so well, is because it is a highly curated and controlled environment.

Counter argument. iTunes.

    By that way of thinking, the fact that Ford only sells Ford parts for their Ford cars, is also a monopoly.

You can buy non OEM parts to maintain and repair your Ford vehicle and you do not have to take your vehicle to a licensed Ford dealership for maintenance. At the same time, purchasing a Ford vehicle does not create a system that incentivises you to purchase additional Ford vehicles down the road no does it in any way cause any barriers if you also own a Hyundai simultaneously. Where as, if you buy an Apple product and get locked in the Apple ecosystem, there are built in incentives that encourage you to continue buying Apple products instead of changing platforms.

    I'm more shallow than you gave me credit.

Nah, I just think too much.

    Newton wrote twice as much about Alchemy than Physics. We can regret the fact that he wasted so much time on immortality and gold transmutation, or may be.. Newton would not have found anything in Physics if he wasn't so obsessed with Alchemy.

I think the counter argument you're trying to make, and what would actually be the counter argument to the article I shared, is that there are more "dead ends" in science than "discoveries" but we don't always know where paths will lead unless we decide to explore them.

In regards to Alchemy in particular, I sometimes wonder if that's something we could consider re exploring, what with a more developed knowledge of math and physics and fusion and fission and such.

    So I guess, let's enjoy our video game and comics readings, it might bear fruits we wont reach otherwise

I'm not saying we shouldn't, but I also think we should be more careful to the extent that we pursue these things and try to better understand how they can affect us.

I personally found it funny that I saw both articles within the span of five minutes, so I felt compelled to share. :)

As for your comparison, while I think there's room for both science and sports, I actually agree with you to an extent. I am starting to think that we should become a bit more aware of how we consume culture, whether it's sports, music, movies, video games, what have you, for many reasons. For instance, I worry that sometimes they distract us from committing ourselves to personal and social development. If for example, I stay home and play video games and read comics all day, the activity prevents me from furthering my personal education, developing skills and talents, and going out in the world and being an active, positive presence in my community. Or, as another example, say I'm so invested in the success of a sports team or the stories of a fictional series that I start to form my identity around them. While I think it's important to be able to identify with things, we should understand that we shouldn't let things identify us and when we start to express aspects of tribalism around these things, we're allowing our passions and interests take us into unhealthy areas.

So I don't know if you were attempting to be hyperbolic, but I do see some merit in the argument. After all, we all can't be scientists, but we can all be bigger than what we think we're capable of, and we need to stop and consider what might be holding us back and why.

This single video was probably responsible for a near countless number of Quicktime codec installs on Windows boxes.

sd86  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 13, 2018

Neither Christian nor a Historian, but from what I understand the view is quite modern and has roots in American Temperance. Back then, alcohol was seen as both the result and the cause of social ills much like crack cocaine was viewed in the '70s-'90s and opioids are viewed today. It was a social reaction and since the churches were a major cornerstone of society, they were influenced just as much by the reaction as they were able to influence it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_views_on_alcohol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperance_movement

I recommend perusing the wikipedia article, because I very well may be wrong.

As an aside, I once had the chance to purchase a temperance era book full of morality tales. They were stories such as "Jacob was prone to drinking. One night, he commited murder" and "Susan was a lush with loose morals, five kids, and no man will marry her." It was interesting, but ultimately, I didn't feel like it fit in well with my book collection.

A series of questions I think we should all ask ourselves in regard to this experiment.

First and foremost, what is you kneejerk reaction to this concept? Why do you think you have that response?

What role does privacy play both in regards to human rights as well as the dignity of individuals? Why is privacy something we desire, expect, and value?

The standard argument today is that if we're in public we have given up any expectation of privacy. Even in public, shouldn't we be allowed some degree of privacy in the form of anonymity, concealed movements, etc.? Why or why not? How would you feel if at any time a police officer could stop you, ask who you are, where you are coming from, and where are you going? How would you feel if at any time literally anyone could stop you and ask you those questions? How is passive surveillance similar and how is it different?

What effects could this system potentially have on the people being watched? What effects could this system potentially have on the people watching? How could it be open to abuse or scandal? What changes could be made to this system that could increase or decrease chances for abuse and how would the change the effectiveness of the system? For example, what if facial recognition software was implemented and the names and information of citizens were prominently displayed for all to see?

If this system was implemented where you lived, would it make you think twice about stepping out in public? Do you think you'd be likely to sit down on your computer and see what's going on in your city? Would you feel more safe or less safe? What changes would make you feel more or less comfortable with this system? Why?

sd86  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 6, 2018

It's good seeing you bro. I was just thinking about you the other day actually.

Nothing major happened. Just hanging out on the computer/internet isn't really for me any more. I deleted my account to fight the temptation of being on here on a semi-regular basis, but you know how it is. Old habits die hard, especially when that habit is talking to cool people on Hubski.

sd86  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: June 6, 2018

Yeah. We do the inter library loan when we need to though.

That said, nothing beats browsing the shelves and discovering. A library, book store, what have you, really needs a semi-decent collection to make that worth while.