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comment by applewood

The era of web comics was something great. I think at one time, I probably had twenty or thirty titles in my bookmarks that I would check diligently. I remember Top 100 Sites, Web Rings, and Button Sharing. Looking back, it really was quite the DIY art movement for the digital age. I didn't know I missed it until I started thinking about it.




veen  ·  11 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I didn't know I missed it until I started thinking about it.

You know, I totally agree. To me at least, the webcomic 'scene' has been reduced to Reddit bait and half a bajillion interchangeable Tumblrs. I loved that each site had their own unique look and (usually shitty) way to navigate comics.

The shift makes sense; most people can't create art and write HTML/CSS. But it feels much more meaningful to have art on the internet be put in the environment made and designed by the artist, instead of on the generic platforms of social media and aggregators. Kinda feels like the difference between displaying art in someone's studio vs. Walmart.

Maybe that's why I still visit SMBC Comics.

circuit  ·  11 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I would expect anyone using reddit or tumblr for webcomics goes to at least one site. One thing I've started noticing is that Patreon comment sections seem really good compared to other social media sites for the ones that have it

applewood  ·  11 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    But it feels much more meaningful to have art on the internet be put in the environment made and designed by the artist, instead of on the generic platforms of social media and aggregators.

Yes! The websites themselves, from the layouts and art on it, to what the creators wanted to emphasize, to the almost journal like sharing of information from the creators, were pretty much artistic expressions themselves. Facebook, being a public forum, is like entering a gallery to view art. Personal websites though, were like visiting the artist's home.