Ever since Budweiser was sold to Belgian brewing monster InBev on Sunday, beer drinkers have been sighing that a piece of Americana has been lost. They’ve got it all wrong. During its rise to President for Life of Beers, Budweiser ended up crushing dozens of local brands that formed part of this country’s colorful drinking heritage.

    Imagine the Budweiser Clydesdale team on a cross-country rampage, with a decrepit, tipsy August A. Busch Jr. strapped to the lead horse, wearing a bright red St. Louis Cardinals cowboy hat. Starting on the West Coast, platter-hoofed horses trample a can of Blitz-Weinhard, spewing suds all over the streets of Portland, Ore. Moving south to San Francisco, they stamp on bottles of Lucky Lager. In their hometown of St. Louis, they crash through the wall of a Griesedieck Bros. brewery, rolling hundreds of barrels into the Mississippi. They’re seen next in Cincinnati, kicking a Hudepohl taster to death. The Clydesdales’ tour of destruction ends in Brooklyn, N.Y., where Busch orders them to urinate in a vat of Piels, cackling that no one will be able to tell the difference.



ButterflyEffect:

Utica Club! They mentioned Utica Club. Wow, what a great beer in the same kind of way Rainier is a great beer. This article nailed in in that refrigeration and marketing are what sent Budweiser over the top of just about everybody else.


posted by kleinbl00: 120 days ago