I recently accepted an offer for a new job. I have had the offer for about a week now. Since receiving the offer I have had two other interviews. I'm telling you, it's amazing how much better I performed in the interview process knowing that I had a good offer on the table already.

Yesterday, I interviewed with the largest medical device company in the world. I sat down at the table with the regional hiring manager across from me and I wrote down three words on a piece of blank paper.

  Fine
  Good
  Great
After shaking his hand, he started in on the questions. His first was to ask me my "selling style/strategy."

I responded by asking him, "how is your family?"

He looked confused and said, "great."

I circled the word "great" on my piece of paper, letting him clearly see me do so.

He looked perplexed.

I asked, "how come you said 'great' and didn't give me more details about how your kids are doing in school or what plans you and your wife have for vacations this year etc...."

He looked even more perplexed.

I said, "is it because I haven't earned the right to ask you a question like, 'how is your family' yet?"

He smiled.

I said, "in sales, how can we walk in to a prospect and immediately ask questions about how their first quarter was, or what their goals for fiscal 2016 are and expect a meaningful answer? We haven't earned the right yet."

I went on to tell him about my sales philosophy of "earning the right," through a consultative approach, leveraging in-depth industry knowledge and peer set analysis. I went on to describe how I use the challenger selling model to create a moment of constructive tension, where the prospect has realized a deficiency in how they are currently doing business. I then get them to agree that a solution is needed. Then, after getting them to describe the ideal solution to me, with them soliciting MY advice as to how to solve their problem. Well... then I can ask them, "how is your family." -I've earned the right.

I am not taking the job. But the hiring manager said I had the most polished selling skills he's ever seen in an applicant, which was very nice to hear.

OftenBen nowaypablo and anyone else that is interested in a career in sales, I thought I might start writing some of my philosophy/strategy here on Hubski occasionally.

follow #sellingwithtng for more posts.


user-inactivated:

#sellingwithtng is a tag I will follow


posted by thenewgreen: 720 days ago