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veen's comments
veen  ·  1 hour ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: New AHOY Video!! The Rocket Launcher

Nothing personal francopoli, but I kind of hate videos like this. Ahoy's chanel in particular looks to me like someone took a few days to learn Adobe After Effects and went to town wit. It's all fancy transitions with just some surface level insights and everyone thinks it's amazing. I mean, when you write down what he actually says (taken from the subs):

    rocket launchers incorporate the propellant means within the projectile hence accelerating once fired.

    in any case launching is only the means to an end that being the delivery of a payload onto a target.

    the nickname stuck to the point that bazooka became a catch-all term for any rocket launcher old or new, a generic term that still remains in use.

    and so it was stories of war that first introduced launchers to the popular culture but as the era of action films came of age their influence would spread.

I know I'm cherry picking but I also think that there are much worse examples of this. Am I expecting too much from a simple YouTube video? I know better videos are possible and I know I could write this (hell, I have written better videos if I may say so myself). The AE can't be that difficult to make. Perhaps I'm underestimating the process behind actually making YT videos (elizabeth / kleinbl00?); perhaps I'm annoyed that I didn't do this myself, but I see so much YT videos that are less informative than a cursory Wikipedia read get hundreds of thousands of views and it just annoys the hell out of me.

elizabeth  ·  21 minutes ago  ·  link  ·  

I know you listen to Hello Internet - and surely CGPGrey talking about his research process illustrates how hard it can be. There are entire production teams behind channels like Kurzgesagt. I think this style of videos are quite hard to produce honestly. I agree this one isn't great, but most stuff on YouTube isn't either. It's often a one-nonprofessionnal-person effort which greatly explains it. And one person will rarely be good at all things so you'll often see good text with shitty animation or vice versa. If you think you can do just as well (or even better) maybe you should do it and make a killing! But it's mostly just very time consuming.

Interview style, like Brady Haran does it a lot easier because not being 100% accurate in your facts/mis-speaking is fine when talking off the top of your head. Or when it's an opinion piece like Nerdwriter does and you don't need to be factual (but it still takes him a week/video).

veen  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: New Gorillaz Music

Gorillaz has a special place in my heart too. I remember playing their Flash game something like 12 years ago:

If anyone here hasn't given Damon Albarn's solo album a shot, I highly recommend it. To me it is much more personal than any Gorillaz album ever was.

flagamuffin  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

saved

i always forget solo albums

Sorry, this comment is private.
veen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: March 22, 2017

Then how does eduroam solve this problem? I have solid wifi on all campuses in the world and throughout all campus buildings with no issues like this, through one single 'eduroam' SSID.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ever set up an Airport Express? Simple as fuck, right?

How bout setting up an Airport Express to extend an existing network? utter shitshow, right? I'm not even sure they let you do it anymore. Take it from me - it takes about five hours of experimentation the first time, then pretty much every time you change something, expect to spend another couple hours.

Wanna see how Eduroam does it? It's on the Wikipedia page:

    The eduroam service uses IEEE 802.1X as the authentication method and a hierarchal system of RADIUS servers.[15] The hierarchy consists of RADIUS servers at the participating institutions, national RADIUS servers run by the National Roaming Operators and regional top-level RADIUS servers for individual world regions. When a user A from institution B in country C with two-letter country-code top-level domain xy visits institution P in country Q, A's mobile device presents his credentials to the RADIUS server of institution P. That RADIUS server discovers that it is not responsible for the Institution_B.xy realm and proxies the access request to the national RADIUS server of country Q. If C and Q are different countries, it is in turn proxied to the regional top-level RADIUS server, and then to the national RADIUS server of country C, which has a complete list of the participating eduroam institutions in that country. That national server forwards the credentials to the home institution B, where they are verified. The 'acknowledge' travels back over the proxy-hierarchy to the visited institution P and the user is granted access.

You can build a mesh network with Ubiquiti or Ruckus or whatever. You pay more. a Unifi is like $90 a node, compared to the $25 you pay for consumer shit. But it allows you to have everything working in concert - adjust the power, hand signals off from WAP to WAP and most importantly, put credentialing and access at one centralized location.

On the other hand, when you open up your Comcast router it has a 2nd network built in, on the same frequencies, at the same power, as your own personal SSID. The only thing Comcast has control over is whether or not your credentials let you on.

It matters a lot less when things are well-spaced but when they aren't, look out.

raisin  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Yeah, I'm curious about this as well, currently on eduroam wi-fi with no problems.

veen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Self-driving cars can't cure traffic. Surge pricing can.

So I agree in the general points you make, but disagree with the specifics, and I think it mostly has to do with this assumption:

    When you eliminate those vectors of uncertainty from the calculation, you can fit FAR more vehicles into the current traffic pattern, with little/no impact on the current traffic flow and control mechanisms.

While AVs are much more accurate and can be far more stable than regular cars, I don't think AVs can eliminate those uncertainties. I also don't think that infrastructure will be changed all that much to AVs. Sure, we can redraw the lines to fit three vehicles next to each other instead of two, but one of the reasons I think AVs are such an incredibly promising technology development is that you don't need to build new infrastructure. No rollercoaster-like tubes necessary.

(Sidenote about that: you're forgetting the impact G-forces have on the rider experience. If I'm in an AV, I don't want to spill my drink because my car decided to go off the highway. The general public does not like even minor G forces, especially not in day-to-day vehicles. )

Another thing that you ought to keep in mind is that infrastructure changes will always involve or depend on the government. Seeing the sluggish progress on something non-physical like the regulatory frameworks indicates to me the government's reluctance to radically change its infrastructure to this new tech.

In my opinion the real efficiencies are to be found at the use of resources and energy to transport all the people in, say, a city. Moving to all-electric, demand-driven taxi-like AVs will, without

    Because all the AVs are talking to one another constantly

That is still something I need to see to believe. I think that vehicle-to-cellular-to-vehicle communication will be inevitable (e.g., communicating roadworks quickly to all vehicles) but that vehicle-to-vehicle communication and harmonization of control is something that will end up not being reliable enough. Platooning - the term coined for train-like AV's - is now being tested at at least a few feet of distance, and while I do see vehicles being close together based on camera vision / radar, I don't think the swarm-like AV behaviours that people dream of is actually feasible.

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The beginning of the end? Reddit introduces profile pages

It's all downhill from here.

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski, what does your productivity palace look like?

I got mine from Massdrop, so when a buddy of mine wanted good headphones I convinced him to go for the Massdrop sale then, the AKG K7XX. In a side by side comparison I kinda love mine more. The M50x is much more 'precise', if that makes sense. It's like it comes with a mixer built in or something, whereas that AKG sounded like it had some drowned out sounds.

nowaypablo  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

That's good to know. But AKG has enough high-end equipment that I'm sure there will be something to top the M50x. That said, again, the M50x is pretty freakin' amazing.

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski, what does your productivity palace look like?

Oh totally. It's still in near mint condition, only now the leather on the earpads is starting to wear off, which is completely reasonable because I've been using it in all weather conditions and often 4 hours at a time.

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski Laser Woodcut is Wearable

I never even considered it working as a medallion, but it sounds like a great idea! Glad that it made it there in one, erhm, two pieces. :)

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The beginning of the end? Reddit introduces profile pages

Podcast!

veen  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski, what does your productivity palace look like?

You forgot about the headphones! I have been rawking the same M50x's since 2014.

rezzeJ  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I still use a pair of the old M50s daily that I bought around Christmas 2010. And it's not like I've taken that great care of them. Absolute troopers.

Though they are starting to show their age now. All the covering on the headband has fallen off and I recently broke a little bit of plastic which ensures the cup stays in place when up against the resistance of your head. I had to tape that up so now left side no longer folds. I guess I dropped them one too many times. I'll probably try to get another 6-12 months out of them.

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Oh totally. It's still in near mint condition, only now the leather on the earpads is starting to wear off, which is completely reasonable because I've been using it in all weather conditions and often 4 hours at a time.

nowaypablo  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Mine literally broke last night. Proof of karma for not mentioning them in my original post.

Fixed it with duct tape. 2 years of the best budget studio quality and I treat it like I treat my combat boots.

One day I'll have a pair of AKGs. One day :')

veen  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I got mine from Massdrop, so when a buddy of mine wanted good headphones I convinced him to go for the Massdrop sale then, the AKG K7XX. In a side by side comparison I kinda love mine more. The M50x is much more 'precise', if that makes sense. It's like it comes with a mixer built in or something, whereas that AKG sounded like it had some drowned out sounds.

nowaypablo  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

That's good to know. But AKG has enough high-end equipment that I'm sure there will be something to top the M50x. That said, again, the M50x is pretty freakin' amazing.

rezzeJ  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ah damn, that sucks. I think I'm going to go for a pair of Beyerdynamics next.

Sorry, this comment is private.
veen  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 219th Weekly "Share Some Music You've Been Into Lately" Thread

There's a new Ásgeir album on the way. Here's one of the two singles:

New Fleet Foxes too. More of the same, I guess:

Same goes for the new alt-J:

I've also been listening to Laura Marling's new album. Like with so many indie music, the clip is weird/artsy enough that it's better to ignore (and mildly nsfw):

veen  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Book review of Seeing Like a State

They say Rotterdam was bombed twice, once by the Germans and once by architects.

This story is pretty much exactly what I was taught in my first urban planning class, beat by beat in the context of the Netherlands. There's neighborhoods here that planners call 'stamp neighborhoods', since the blocks were designed once to hold the perfectly-calculated amount of households and then just copy-pasted again and again and again, like stamping your city. Like these nine blocks, or this entire part of Rotterdam.

The good news is that we've moved on from this top-down scientific rationality, which is how my professors described it, towards understanding the diversity of cities and their people. The world is complex, so communication and collaboration between all the people involved is necessary to make better cities - not a city-sized eraser like Corbs wanted.

flagamuffin  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Oddly, it's the suburbs (in the US) that are built with the stamp -- you know (or maybe you don't, luckily), giant tract houses with two feet of sideyard between them, lots of pavement, no trees. The worst hell to live in. Think the end of A Wrinkle in Time, which is really mostly social commentary.

In Austin, you can instantly tell if you're in a neighborhood built in the '60s or '70s because it conforms to the topography, kept its trees, and the houses vary. The cookie-cutter stuff came later. The campus, of course, is generally brutalist.

Devac  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    There's neighborhoods here that planners call 'stamp neighborhoods', since the blocks were designed once to hold the perfectly-calculated amount of households and then just copy-pasted again and again and again, like stamping your city. Like these nine blocks, or this entire part of Rotterdam.

I have a game for you:

CPU or city in the Eastern Europe? :P

veen  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Self-driving cars can't cure traffic. Surge pricing can.

Isolated high-speed tracks are the perfect environment for AVs. The control part of cars seems to have been figured out by now with almost millimeter precision. I thought however that, in general, of those lanes did not have special exits? I vaguely recall drivers in LA crossing something like five lanes to get from the carpool lane to the exit.

goobster  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Right. The Exit/Onramp problem is simply solved with AV's, because you do not need traffic lights and 8-feet of extra space on either side to accommodate idiot drivers, and you can have walls and tunnels and narrow passages because you don't have to worry about people panic-braking because the lane got narrower, etc.

Essentially, if we had SmartCar-sized AV's, we could fit TWO lanes, side-by-side, in the space currently taken by ONE lane of idiot-operated cars.

Every single road is something like 80% wasted space and design, to account for human error, and the peculiar foibles of our sensory systems. When you eliminate those vectors of uncertainty from the calculation, you can fit FAR more vehicles into the current traffic pattern, with little/no impact on the current traffic flow and control mechanisms.

Let's look at a detailed example...

Off-Ramps and AV's

Because AV's are smaller and narrower than a regular car, you have TWO lanes of AV's operating in your current HOV lane.

Off- and On-ramps are on the LEFT side of the freeway, and ONLY accessible to AVs.

They do not need to be built to support a 40-ton semi tractor trailer. They need to support a series of 1800-pound AVs. The off-ramp also doesn't need to be flat, or provide forward visibility, or a clear line of sight, so angles, turn radii, and crash zones don't need to be designed into the off-ramp design. (Imagine AVs turning off the freeway into a simple tube, that bends down away from the freeway in a sweeping arc, towards the road below.)

The outside of the tubes can become public art spaces... paint them like snakes, or dragons, or whales, or whatever.

Below the freeway, the tube merges with regular traffic in a standard merge lane, or - more likely - adds a lane to the road that is dedicated to AVs.

AVs enter the freeway the opposite way, entering the freeway from the left, and merging in with other AVs.

Because all the AVs are talking to one another constantly, the flow of traffic in these lanes is smooth. All the vagraries of acceleration, object avoidance, jammed up off-ramps, etc, are spread amongst ALL of the vehicles in the area, so each one backs off an inch (for example) and the cumulative effect over 60 vehicles is enough space for a new vehicle to merge in.

With two AV lanes, the left one is the slower lane, with traffic entering and exiting the freeway, and the right lane is the "fast" lane for vehicles going further.

The AVs essentially become person-sized train cars, wirelessly connected, which can dynamically "connect" and "disconnect" from the cars in front and behind them, and flow in with vehicles in the other lane.

The Fun Stuff

The best part is once people get past their hangup on the "Trolley Problem" strawman argument, and the software designers get to begin thinking of how to make things flow like water, rather than road designers having to design to accommodate that Escalade with one person in it, who is also on the phone, and riding on bald tires with brakes that should've been serviced 20k miles ago.

What if an AV gets a flat tire? I could see the AVs in front and back "teaming up" and sandwiching the one with the flat tire, and helping it get safely to a turnout or Repair-de-sac (something I just made up: a little turnout that can fit 3 AVs... the "bad" one, the "replacement" one that picks up the rider immediately and continues their journey, and the Repair vehicle that carries the dude who fixes the broken one.)

When we get to this point, London reduces the number of vehicles allowed in The City even further. Taxicabs in two lanes, AVs in their own four lanes. That provides the financial base and incentive for the AV companies to develop and built resilient systems, and tweak the code in a live environment, before rollout to progressive cities worldwide... Sao Paolo, Vancouver, Toronto, Dubai, Stockholm, Berlin, Nagoya, etc.

veen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

So I agree in the general points you make, but disagree with the specifics, and I think it mostly has to do with this assumption:

    When you eliminate those vectors of uncertainty from the calculation, you can fit FAR more vehicles into the current traffic pattern, with little/no impact on the current traffic flow and control mechanisms.

While AVs are much more accurate and can be far more stable than regular cars, I don't think AVs can eliminate those uncertainties. I also don't think that infrastructure will be changed all that much to AVs. Sure, we can redraw the lines to fit three vehicles next to each other instead of two, but one of the reasons I think AVs are such an incredibly promising technology development is that you don't need to build new infrastructure. No rollercoaster-like tubes necessary.

(Sidenote about that: you're forgetting the impact G-forces have on the rider experience. If I'm in an AV, I don't want to spill my drink because my car decided to go off the highway. The general public does not like even minor G forces, especially not in day-to-day vehicles. )

Another thing that you ought to keep in mind is that infrastructure changes will always involve or depend on the government. Seeing the sluggish progress on something non-physical like the regulatory frameworks indicates to me the government's reluctance to radically change its infrastructure to this new tech.

In my opinion the real efficiencies are to be found at the use of resources and energy to transport all the people in, say, a city. Moving to all-electric, demand-driven taxi-like AVs will, without

    Because all the AVs are talking to one another constantly

That is still something I need to see to believe. I think that vehicle-to-cellular-to-vehicle communication will be inevitable (e.g., communicating roadworks quickly to all vehicles) but that vehicle-to-vehicle communication and harmonization of control is something that will end up not being reliable enough. Platooning - the term coined for train-like AV's - is now being tested at at least a few feet of distance, and while I do see vehicles being close together based on camera vision / radar, I don't think the swarm-like AV behaviours that people dream of is actually feasible.