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veen  ·  2 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Finland cancels UBI study 8 months early

Alternate title: “Study is going to run 2 years like it was intended to be.”

I’ve seen this news item propped up on social media mostly by people with an axe to grind. It will not be extended but also won’t be canceled early.

I had my driving lessons in a Focus. My grandparents also drove one for years. Easy riders, never a hitch. The newer ones seem more focused on being hip and trendy instead of being the safe option though.

veen  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: M.C. Esher: Inside St Peter’s - 1935

I did that actually! Wait, lemme see if I took a pic of that.

Edit: never mind, I forgot my charger on my trip in 2010 so my camera battery was dead at that time. But I did wonder why the drawing looked so familiar, and it's because of that climb. Really cemented the magic of that place... I remember finding it incredibly hard to comprehend the sheer size of the St. Peter.

veen  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: M.C. Esher: Inside St Peter’s - 1935

Well, “all the way” just so happens to be a 45 minute train ride for me, so I don’t have a good reason not to go.

veen  ·  7 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: M.C. Esher: Inside St Peter’s - 1935

Thanks for reminding me to go to the Escher Museum some day! I quite like Escher, partly because we share a birthplace. But I hadn't seen that one yet.

speeding_snail  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Ah yes, I was about to say the same thing. It's all the way in the Hague unfortunately.

veen  ·  3 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Well, “all the way” just so happens to be a 45 minute train ride for me, so I don’t have a good reason not to go.

veen  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: PSA: Get thoughtful or GTFO

It’s the 10.5” Pro with 2224 by 1668 pixelaroos, which is a 4:3 ratio. (Not a yuge deal if you can’t fix it easily. I like the change on my other devices!)

veen  ·  23 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: PSA: Get thoughtful or GTFO

Despite your rapid response, it is not yet fixed on either Safari or Firefox for me.

mk  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

What is the aspect ratio of your arcane device?

veen  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

It’s the 10.5” Pro with 2224 by 1668 pixelaroos, which is a 4:3 ratio. (Not a yuge deal if you can’t fix it easily. I like the change on my other devices!)

goobster  ·  23 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

You've done the obvious? Cleared the cache, etc? CSS is heavily cached in most browsers.

veen  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: PSA: Get thoughtful or GTFO

That’s cool ‘n all but your new top bar is eating up the top part on every page:

mk  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

Hm. Can fix. What browser, etc?

EDIT: Oh, that's an iPad. Grrr... Thought the media query was picking up iPad dimensions.

UPDATE: Should be fixed. Let me know if it's not.

veen  ·  23 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Despite your rapid response, it is not yet fixed on either Safari or Firefox for me.

mk  ·  17 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

What is the aspect ratio of your arcane device?

veen  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

It’s the 10.5” Pro with 2224 by 1668 pixelaroos, which is a 4:3 ratio. (Not a yuge deal if you can’t fix it easily. I like the change on my other devices!)

goobster  ·  23 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

You've done the obvious? Cleared the cache, etc? CSS is heavily cached in most browsers.

veen  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 25, 2018

Having just made the transition to a new home and a grown-up’s budget...I have barely changed my habits or expenses. Mostly because my budgeting style is effectively what kb is arguing for, although I had never thought of it that way. Once in a blue moon I take a look at the recurring payments and cull whatever doesn’t bring me joy à la Marie Kondo. My approach to buying stuff is one I took from Adam Savage: when you first buy something, buy the cheapest, because you don’t know if you will use it often yet. When that breaks, buy the best there is (or the one that makes you the most happy).

Basically, my approach to budgeting is to make it invisible. The only thing I care about is that I don’t have to worry about money: that I can pay all my expenses and have enough wiggle room to buy things that make me happy. So I make sure that I never have less than one month of expenses in my checkings account, while also moving money to my savings regularly, because if I see a large number on my checkings account I get the irresistible urge to buy shit I don’t need.

veen  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 25, 2018

It’s now been almost 3 months since I started working! On the one hand, I feel like I have found my place among my peers; I know what I can and can’t tackle, I’m loving the various projects I’m working on, and I’m actively pushing the data team forward by building a Python/PostGIS work environment for our models. My added value is in innovation and structurizing, and there’s visible progress in both.

On the other hand I am thinking about more longer-term goals, about what I want to get out of it. I like to think ahead as far as I think is reasonable, which is always at least a few months. A difference between me and my coworkers is that most of them have a more clearly defined added value; if you want to do X, get Y to tag along. Don’t know what that is for me yet. Currently I love working on lots of wildly different projects; for example, tomorrow I will start on a project to figure out potential locations for developing small-scale housing on unused plots in bad neighborhood. Yesterday I was working on figuring out how to process data on 3.5 million business. The day before I looked highly detailed and privacy-sensitive demographic data. I like the variation, but I also want to have a more clearly defined place to call my own.

Another thing I want to reconsider is how busy I want to be. Someone once said that work should be a jog in the park with well-timed sprints. The first few weeks were not much more than a walk; the second month was a full sprint, and now I’m back to a modest jog. There’s a balance between being challenged enough and having enough freedom/agency that I don’t think I’ve found yet.

veen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 275th Weekly "Share Some Music You've Been Into Lately" Thread
kleinbl00  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

veen  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: When Harassment Is the Price of a Job

    These kinds of incidents are “so normalized; we experience them so much, and so much more when you work in this kind of industry,” Frank continued. “None of this is about sex, necessarily—it’s all about power. They’re not necessarily getting off on it; they’re showing us how small and insignificant we are and how our bodies aren’t ours. Even our ear canals aren’t ours.”

My housemate and I are going through all episodes of The Office (US) chronologically. Just this week we watched the season 2 episode on sexual harassment. The plot is that Michael Scott, who was an absolute jerk the first two seasons, is not allowed to make sexist comments anymore because of new policy, which he hates because it means he can’t be a jerk all the time anymore.

That was 2005 - it was about power back then, it’s about power now. I know a lot has changed since then, with a lot of inappropriate behavior being addressed in many fields, but pieces like this also make me feel like there is a lot to still be done. A livable wage to me represents the power dynamic change that’s needed, although that doesn’t solve the problem of shitty coworkers.

</thinkingoutloud>

oyster  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Unfortunately in this industry a big problem is just what kind of place the owners want their restaurant to be. The story were the server told her boss about a shitty customer and he was only kicked out after a fight ? A good manager who didn’t want to manage a dive bar would have kicked him out long before that because they knew he would be a liability and cause problems in the future. It’s not just servers giving up power, it’s management doing the same and letting the customer dictate what kind of bar they’re running to sell drinks.

I’ve worked in to many customer facing positions to think changing wages will change anything. Even if I don’t make tips/make a good wage (which we do in Canada) I would still be expected to brush most of this stuff off. I get hit on more but I get treated better as a server than I did when I worked in a grocery store. The problem with how we don’t respect people who serve us goes way beyond our wages. Honestly, I’ve been harassed in every industry I’ve worked in, at least wth serving I’m not doing it for shitty pay.

kleinbl00  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

In TV, I've worked with a lot of restauranteurs/chefs/line service folx. Not doing their jobs, but watching them doing their jobs, listening talk about how they do their jobs, hearing their stories about how they do their jobs.

A stunning number of them suck at doing their jobs.

Most small businesses fail. This is due to the fact that most people who start a business never have before and you don't get a do-over. Generally, people who start small businesses do so in no small part because they don't want anyone telling them what to do. A policy and procedure on sexual harassment is basically letting someone tell you what to do... except it's a faceless bureaucrat who is doing so via canned memos that you're required to post in the breakroom (by the way, you're required to have a breakroom). The businesses that succeed do so by being good at their core mission: ribs, or martinis, or tax prep. They don't succeed by being good at HR.

Restaurants are worse than most because there's a lot of unskilled labor involved. Or, more poignantly, there's a lot of labor where the skill can be cajoling more money out of customers through unctuousness and supplication. Your star chef may have no people skills whatsoever and your manager may be much better at scheduling than they are at conflict resolution and at the scale independent restaurants operate at the likelihood of any blowback from simply shining the problem on is effectively zero.

I do think that moving to an hourly paradigm, rather than a tip paradigm, would improve the situation. For one thing it would improve the stability of employees' lives. For another it would disincentivize putting up with sleazebags because they give you more money. For still another it would reduce the shadiness many restaurant owners employ in hiding tips from employees and make the relationship less adversarial.

But then, I fukk'n hate tipping. How long has Canada had a viable wage for servers? Because if I could say one negative thing about Vancouver, it would be "holy hell East Hastings sure turned into a shithole when heroin came in." If I could say two, the second would be "and restaurant servers there suck an amazing amount." The worst service I've ever experienced has been in Canada.

oyster  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Most restaurants don’t care about the dynamic between staff, but not being able to stand up to customers who are being shitheads will ensure their restaurant is always full of shitheads and they won’t get anywhere. They’ll just be a dive bar. I can’t speak to the situation in America but I haven’t experienced anything in a tipped job that I wasn’t expected to put up with for my hourly wage as well.

Sure, I might not have obvious reason in the form of the tip I want to deal with shitty customers instead of tell them off but I still need to keep my job. That means dealing with shitty customers. I straight up cried I think 3 times when I was a cashier, and dealt with creepy men constantly. When I was a gardener literally covered in dirt I got harassed all the time by men who couldn’t contain their excitement over a female labourer out in the wild and that job interview where I was told I should be able to handle sexual harassment at work if I want this job was an hourly pay. Tipping is something that sort of makes it all “okay” in my mind like at least I’m not putting up with it all for minimum wage anymore.

I don’t know the wages in BC very well, it has never in the time I’ve been working been okay to pay a server what they are paid in some states. Having said that, when I started working 10 years ago I made more on minimum wage than your federal minimum wage is now.

If Kerbal Space Program has taught me anything, it’s that designs like that are much more prone to resonance and twisting (rotational?) forces. Or is that not what irks you?

kleinbl00  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

You can suss those things out, theoretically, through finite element analysis and modal analysis. But then practically, you discover the modal and elemental differences between your model and construction in flight testing.

Rutan is f'n in love with that configuration. That was the basic paradigm of the Rutan Voyager... which ground its wingtips off on takeoff. It's the basic paradigm of Rutan's White Knight. Both of those craft, on the other hand, have a fuselage in the middle. WhiteKnight Two, which first rolled off the assembly line ten years ago, has a whopping 300 hours of flight time... none of which have a load. This thing is basically the WhiteKnight Two, only ridonkulously large.

The Nazis did something similar with the He111 Z1. However, it towed its load. It didn't drop fully a third of its gross weight from one pivot right at the middle of its stress concentrator at the peak envelope of its performance.

I don't like the modal problems. But I really don't like that they're going to rear their heads for the first time at 70,000 feet.

veen  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Why do young men worship Professor Jordan Peterson?

If I may quote myself from the latest book thread:

    12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson. No, I did not read this because of the lobster thing, mostly because I didn't even know that was a thing until today. I did find that a weird and unconvincing part, but that doesn't really matter in the context of the book itself. It reads, and should be read, entirely as a long Sunday sermon buy a pastor who goes on unscientific tangents every now and then. Meaning, science and I disagree with most of what he says, but there are pieces of advice in there that are just what some people need at some moment in their life, which is what redeems it. I would not recommend the book, but might send some passages to people some day.

Peterson wrote, basically, a book-length Hallmark card. If it sounds true enough, people will find meaning in it.

katakowsj  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

On a lobster related note, my grandfather would occasionally lament that my family would act like lobsters in a bucket.

According to him, many trapped lobsters in a bucket work competitively and keep every single lobster in the bucket. Many would be able to escape, if only they would operate in a cooperative manner. One lobster crawls upright, another crawls over it's back, and so on making a bridge so that all but two or three crawl to safety. Instead though, the lobsters tend to pull one another back from the success of crawling out and not one ever leaves the bucket.

My family has definitely been stuck in several buckets before.

kleinbl00  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Every generation needs one I guess.