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mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

Chickens is a thoughtful thing.

OftenBen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

insomniasexx New sticker please!

mike  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

Thank you, this is all very practical advice, and should be very helpful. I'll definitely go light-weight.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

Good to know. As mentioned to ghostoffuffle, I'm cool with them exploring the woods. But if they can't get back, that's on them. The door closes at sundown.

My cousin has a lot more chickens, and she has done pretty well letting them sort it all out.

OftenBen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Chicks are cheep at any rate, and they grow pretty quickly.

Be prepared to start offloading extra eggs on friends and neighbors. Four chickens produces a pretty surprising amount of eggs.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

Ha. My cousin has like two dozen chickens, and they follow her to the coop each night like soldiers. She did lose a few along the way, and maybe it was for the best. I'm definitely not going to be chasing chickens down the street. If they want to strike out on their own, then I wish them all the best.

I'd rather 2 obedient chickens than 4 rebellious ones. If it takes some selection pressure, I'm ok with that.

steve  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm on my phone and I'm super lazy - so we should probably talk on the phone about this... Chickens are dumb and awesome. The eggs are fantastic. When you get them, lock them in the coop for 2 days straight. This seems to reboot their brains and they go in there on their own every night. I never once had to chase a chicken. The closer it gets to sundown, the closer they got to bed. Seriously. So dumb. And so awesome. While they can and may hop/fly over that fence... I doubt they will. And if they do, they'll come back. Honestly - I'd chuck a cheap/temp fence up from the side of your garage to the back fence and let them roam that whole area. You can build/buy a simple coupe to close them in at night. Keep it simple. Keep it easy to clean. All the stuff everyone else said.

Let em roam.

ghostoffuffle  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Maybe if you get chicks, they'll imprint. We inherited our chickens from our landlord- they owed us no allegiance.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

Interesting. I guess that begs the question of whether or not I need the smaller run attached the the coop, or if I should just let them run around the entire area behind the garage. My ordinance says: "A covered enclosure or fenced enclosure shall not be located closer than ten (10) feet from a property line of an adjacent property nor shall it be located closer than forty (40) feet to any residential structure on an adjacent property."

It might be worth having some fenced enclosure connected to the coop (which will meet the distance requirements) so I can make the argument that our yard fence isn't the enclosure itself.

We have a bunny that spends a lot of time in our yard. I wonder if it will like the chickens.

ghostoffuffle  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

We had chickens who constantly escaped from their run. Bear in mind that you have to get them back into the coop every night before sundown or every raccoon/coyote in the neighborhood will treat your yard like a buffet. We lost a couple chickens that way; another got injured, and then her coop mates pecked her half to death because what do you know, chickens are assholes. I had to kill that hen myself just to put her out of her misery, and it was a pretty messy experience.

Anyhow. Chickens don't always get that they have to retreat to the coop. Which means you have to chase them into it. This is easy with a run. It is not easy without. It'll end up dominating your early evening, depending on how many chickens you're getting.

To top it off, chickens don't fly far or well, but they can fly far enough to get over a fence, depending on how resourceful they are about finding the highest take-off point. Then you'll have to chase your chickens through the streets.

Also, chickens obviously shit everywhere. And chicken shit is great for yards, but more by way of introducing it in an orderly manner via compost. If you just have chicken feces willy-nilly throughout the yard, it severely limits your ability to walk around out there, and if you have any kids who play in your yard, you have to worry a great deal more about salmonella and all that jazz. I once read that chickens are more likely to have salmonella in their poop if they've been eating rat turds; thus, if you're letting your chickens run around wherever the hell throughout the day, especially in an urban/suburban setting, they're more likely to find and eat said turds and again disseminate them throughout your relaxin' space as they please.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ha. My cousin has like two dozen chickens, and they follow her to the coop each night like soldiers. She did lose a few along the way, and maybe it was for the best. I'm definitely not going to be chasing chickens down the street. If they want to strike out on their own, then I wish them all the best.

I'd rather 2 obedient chickens than 4 rebellious ones. If it takes some selection pressure, I'm ok with that.

steve  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm on my phone and I'm super lazy - so we should probably talk on the phone about this... Chickens are dumb and awesome. The eggs are fantastic. When you get them, lock them in the coop for 2 days straight. This seems to reboot their brains and they go in there on their own every night. I never once had to chase a chicken. The closer it gets to sundown, the closer they got to bed. Seriously. So dumb. And so awesome. While they can and may hop/fly over that fence... I doubt they will. And if they do, they'll come back. Honestly - I'd chuck a cheap/temp fence up from the side of your garage to the back fence and let them roam that whole area. You can build/buy a simple coupe to close them in at night. Keep it simple. Keep it easy to clean. All the stuff everyone else said.

Let em roam.

ghostoffuffle  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Maybe if you get chicks, they'll imprint. We inherited our chickens from our landlord- they owed us no allegiance.

keifermiller  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Being able to contain them in a run comes in handy if you use your yard at all for non chicken activities. Some people (kids) think chickens are pretty neat, but others find 'em unnerving.

Especially when they mob you because they're out of food. I quite like the chickens, but my sister hates being around them.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I am building a chicken coop. Protips wanted.

The area isn't really amenable to a movable one, as they will get free reign of everywhere I could possibly move it.

I am wondering if they will hop our chain link fence into the woods behind, however.

OftenBen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I am wondering if they will hop our chain link fence into the woods behind, however.

Depending on the breed of chicken and size of fence, this is totally possible. My parents had an issue with a particularly liberty thirsty hen trying to fly the coop and had to extend the fence around the chicken run about 3 feet up in order to contain her.

mk  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Good to know. As mentioned to ghostoffuffle, I'm cool with them exploring the woods. But if they can't get back, that's on them. The door closes at sundown.

My cousin has a lot more chickens, and she has done pretty well letting them sort it all out.

OftenBen  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Chicks are cheep at any rate, and they grow pretty quickly.

Be prepared to start offloading extra eggs on friends and neighbors. Four chickens produces a pretty surprising amount of eggs.

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: We made a video for Forever Labs -- I dig it.

Yes, there is, and that is the plan. You can expand what we collect to exceed the number of cells in your own body. It's my plan to expand both my blood/immune-building hematopoietic stem cells and my bone/connective tissue-building mesenchymal stem cells to ridiculous numbers, and then to freeze those in many individual chambers.

As it stands, we store your cells in 3 large chambers, and 4-5 small ones, so that you can draw up a fraction of them without thawing the rest.

elizabeth  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Awesome! Looks like you thought of everything :)

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: We made a video for Forever Labs -- I dig it.

Roughly 20M MNCs/ml but there is variability. In terms of CFUs, we haven't discerned a difference between the same sample when comparing a frozen aliquot to a fresh one.

We can greatly adversely affect the recovery modifying our culture conditions, however.

elizabeth  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I was wondering - is there a way to multiply those cells in the future? I just imagine i'd be pretty sad if the cells run out, exactly when i would need them the most

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Yes, there is, and that is the plan. You can expand what we collect to exceed the number of cells in your own body. It's my plan to expand both my blood/immune-building hematopoietic stem cells and my bone/connective tissue-building mesenchymal stem cells to ridiculous numbers, and then to freeze those in many individual chambers.

As it stands, we store your cells in 3 large chambers, and 4-5 small ones, so that you can draw up a fraction of them without thawing the rest.

elizabeth  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Awesome! Looks like you thought of everything :)

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: We made a video for Forever Labs -- I dig it.

Yes, that's it.

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: We made a video for Forever Labs -- I dig it.

We use an aspiration, which is a direct draw of a small amount of bone marrow. Mobilization (the process used by DKMS) is more expensive and time-consuming, and doesn't capture the entire bone marrow niche. That said, if you are donating marrow for a transplant, you want a large number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and without expanding them in a lab, mobilization is an easier way to get a large enough number.

It's our goal to collect and store a sufficient number of cells (HSCs, but also bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and others) that can be expanded for many different uses in the future. You could take what we collect and use it for a BM transplant, but it may require expansion of the HSCs first, or a longer engraftment period.

Devac  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

So just to make sure I'm getting this correctly: DKMS is interested only in a subset of cells for a very specific purpose, whereas FL takes everything in order to have a more versatile selection of stem cells? I think that I got it, thanks. :D

mk  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Yes, that's it.

Devac  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  
This comment has been deleted.
mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Telling children 'hard work gets you to the top' is simply a lie

I waited far too long before reading that book.

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Seriously, the guy has a point

    Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference.

This is the author being a bit deceptive. It is all in caps.

Of course, SHE refers to the symbol, but that will be lost in time. Making it all in caps is far more tasteful.

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Telling children 'hard work gets you to the top' is simply a lie

    The secret of a great fortune made without apparent cause is soon forgotten, if the crime is committed in a respectable way.

-Honoré de Balzac

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Telling children 'hard work gets you to the top' is simply a lie

It seems to me the best avenue to move from middle to upper class in the US has been real estate. If you start early, you can continually leverage your building equity to get loans for purchases of more property. US tax law is extremely landlord friendly, allowing you to write off "depreciation" of real estate, while you can also write off any cost of improvements, even as the market appreciates. Aggressively working on a real estate portfolio for 30 years gives a good chance of breaking out of the middle class. I can point to a couple of people that have done so.

I bought a house with two other friends and rented it for a while. It was an enlightening experience. I wouldn't have been able to get started on my own, but after we flipped that house, I could have gone off on my own and expanded if I wanted to.

snoodog  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I noticed that as well. Real estate loans in the US are also non-recourse in most places so you can leverage yourself to the hilt with minimal downside risk. If the market goes up you get all the benefits, if it goes down... to bad you walk away and get locked out of the credit market for a while. As you said tax treatment is very favorable so that helps a lot as well.

Starting your own company is a possibility, but I dont think its very practical these days. International competition makes it hard to get into the any of the low end / simple businesses. If you have some sort of super specialized skills and knowledge maybe you could provide a lot of value but even then you need that good marketing/connections money to start. I heard of a few people making it big on construction companies, but many of them also went bust big time when 2008 hit, I expect a similar problem soon.

I think I could make enough to get by, but not enough to get rich. Once you factor in hours spent/time not spent with family, or doing non work stuff its not really a great deal. Also you already have to be middle class with some sort of cash in the bank to afford to take that risk.

Dot-com stuff was a big money maker for certain people because you didnt actually have to show profit. People would just buy into pie in the sky ideas. Ponzi schemes or similar are super effective, just need to be legal so you dont loose it all in the end.

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The secret of a great fortune made without apparent cause is soon forgotten, if the crime is committed in a respectable way.

-Honoré de Balzac

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Telling children 'hard work gets you to the top' is simply a lie

I'm not familiar with the differences between the US and the UK; here in the US, hard work won't get you to the top, but it is a required part of the formula. It seems to me that 'hard working' is just one component of a personality type that lends to success. Risk-taking and a drive to assume more responsibility are part of it.

Of course, if you are poor, a woman, or a minority, in the US, the deck is stacked against you. It is significantly more difficult for you to 'get to the top'. Unfortunately, because we invest so little in the education of our poor, by the time they grow to become their own advocates, they are often so far behind that there is little hope of ever catching up.

keifermiller  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Of course, if you are poor, a woman, or a minority, in the US, the deck is stacked against you. It is significantly more difficult for you to 'get to the top'. Unfortunately, because we invest so little in the education of our poor, by the time they grow to become their own advocates, they are often so far behind that there is little hope of ever catching up.

I read this passage last night, from the close of Malcolm's portion of The Autobiography of Malcolm X as told to Alex Haley:

    My greatest lack has been, I believe, that I don't have the kind of academic education I wish I had been able to get -- to have been a lawyer, perhaps. I do believe that I might have made a good lawyer. I have always loved verbal battle, and challenge. You can believe me that if I had the time right now, I would not be one bit ashamed to go back into any New York City public school and start where I left off at the ninth grade, and go on through a degree. Because I don't begin to be academically equipped for so many of the interests that I have.
mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I waited far too long before reading that book.

chessandbridge  ·  4 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I'm not familiar with the differences between the US and the UK

The UK is even worse than, but very close to, the US in terms of social mobility. Your assessment that hard work + other things is required to get to the top is probably equally valid in both countries.

http://www.epi.org/publication/usa-lags-peer-countries-mobility/

snoodog  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Social mobility is very regional/national. In some countries its possible to move between lower and middle class in others it is not.

In the US the easiest method was always the military, if you went to the military and you didn't end up with PTSD or any bits blown off and you worked hard you were basically guaranteed middle class life.

Now transitioning between middle and upper class... I have no idea how that works or if its possible. I dont know anyone that has made that leap, perhaps if I worked in the valley I might but the bar to get to upper class is pretty huge these days. Only way I can think of getting there is to basically be upper middle class and use lots of leverage or other peoples money. Even then going back through my own life and all my decisions using maximum available leverage, I at best could have made a million bucks, which wouldn't really get me very close to upper class.

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It seems to me the best avenue to move from middle to upper class in the US has been real estate. If you start early, you can continually leverage your building equity to get loans for purchases of more property. US tax law is extremely landlord friendly, allowing you to write off "depreciation" of real estate, while you can also write off any cost of improvements, even as the market appreciates. Aggressively working on a real estate portfolio for 30 years gives a good chance of breaking out of the middle class. I can point to a couple of people that have done so.

I bought a house with two other friends and rented it for a while. It was an enlightening experience. I wouldn't have been able to get started on my own, but after we flipped that house, I could have gone off on my own and expanded if I wanted to.

snoodog  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I noticed that as well. Real estate loans in the US are also non-recourse in most places so you can leverage yourself to the hilt with minimal downside risk. If the market goes up you get all the benefits, if it goes down... to bad you walk away and get locked out of the credit market for a while. As you said tax treatment is very favorable so that helps a lot as well.

Starting your own company is a possibility, but I dont think its very practical these days. International competition makes it hard to get into the any of the low end / simple businesses. If you have some sort of super specialized skills and knowledge maybe you could provide a lot of value but even then you need that good marketing/connections money to start. I heard of a few people making it big on construction companies, but many of them also went bust big time when 2008 hit, I expect a similar problem soon.

I think I could make enough to get by, but not enough to get rich. Once you factor in hours spent/time not spent with family, or doing non work stuff its not really a great deal. Also you already have to be middle class with some sort of cash in the bank to afford to take that risk.

Dot-com stuff was a big money maker for certain people because you didnt actually have to show profit. People would just buy into pie in the sky ideas. Ponzi schemes or similar are super effective, just need to be legal so you dont loose it all in the end.

mk  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    The secret of a great fortune made without apparent cause is soon forgotten, if the crime is committed in a respectable way.

-Honoré de Balzac