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francopoli  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 17, 2019

I got to see the Falcon Heavy launch.

I am planning on going to the first manned flights in August, to do it all again, if I can pull it off.

kleinbl00  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

I know NASA people. I know Caltech people. I know physicists, I know scientists, I have had a truly blessed interaction with marvels and mysteries so profound that I couldn't be sussed to ride my bike a mile to watch Endeavor truck through Compton.

You know what science always needs? OUTREACH.

That wonder in your head? The exultation that muted the voices? That is what launches wonders. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy, but because they are hard. We live in an era where scientific discovery has been so annihilated by jaded cynicism that not one, not two but three billionaires have said "fukkit I'll do it myself." Know who the last person to visit the Mariana Trench was? James Fucking Cameron. We killed the Superconducting Supercollider because Tom Delay needed to be punished - fuck science.

You know what you should do? You should get a couple hummin' telescopes and sit 'em out where little kids and vaguely-interested parents can look at the universe through 'em. You should figure out how to get your locals enthused by the mysteries all around 'em. You should let everyone you meet know what a miraculous universe we live in because we can see it with our own eyes. You should channel your galactic fanboi every chance you get because every time a cynic sees a dreamer flying their flag high, their cynicism melts a little more. And when the cynicism is melted away the miracles can flow.

...Oh, you're already doing that?

Well carry on, then. Because all the shouldas in the world aren't worth a single WILL.

    I'll never fly a plane.

Why the hell not?

    Or build a satellite.

Why the hell not?

    Or work for a space company.

But you can inspire those who will.

    Or do work that is going to make a difference.

I suspect you already have.

    At least I have the thought that I'll be dead soon and it won't matter anyway.

The longer you stick around, the more people you will inspire. Not gonna lie. You inspire me and I'm one of the most jaded cynics I know.

I mean, shit. I didn't ride my bike a mile to see Endeavor truck through Compton.

Dala  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

Was thinking all of these things while reading what you wrote, but of course, KB expresses them so much better than I ever will. I feel all of these same things, but at least you are doing space outreach work. My sorry ass just works in an office and wishes she could even do that. Sometimes I think about volunteering at the observatory here. Maybe this post is the impetus I need to actually get off my ass and do it.

johnnyFive  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

I can relate to your second-to-last paragraph a great deal. It's something I've struggled with a lot. I can't help but think about what I could be doing if i'd been put on meds back in elementary school. Of course, it may not have made a damn bit of difference. One of my big revelations over the last couple days is actually how little treatment has changed me. And also how grand my expectations were for myself, which is taking some re-adjusting. I think the Internet fucks up our perspective, in that we lose ourselves in the crowd, and can often fail to see the little successes and positive ripples we send out.

I don't mean you should be happy with less, necessarily, and that's the part I'm still trying to deal with: how to be more realistic without feeling like I'm settling or giving up.

francopoli  ·  11 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 325th Weekly "Share Some Music You've Been Into Lately" Thread

I hung out with young people this weekend. This is what they were playing and "dancing" to. Russia? Of course Russia.

Very big warning here, most of their songs are not safe for work, mixed company, those last two brain cells that hold hope for humanity, and/or the people who's respect and trust you will need later.

francopoli  ·  21 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: March 27, 2019

We had to read Meditations in Vulgar Latin (yay Latin Mass) a long, long time ago. I should read it in English now that I am old enough to really get something out of it.

Dala  ·  21 days ago  ·  link  ·  

This is a book that once I read it, I have pretty much kept on my nightstand or in my bag, as I keep going back to it. A note on versions, as there are many out there:

I’ve picked up two different English translations now and they are different from each other in interesting ways. The Hays translation (Modern Library) is a little more “plain English” and is my favorite of the two, the Penguin Classic (Hammond translation) is a bit more poetic, which I don’t like as much but it is fun to compare the versions. I do like the indexes in the back of the Penguin version.

francopoli  ·  21 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: March 27, 2019

At 5:01PM Friday, I disconnect from the internet. Totally go offline. All I get is work email in case I need to do something work related. Everything else? OFF. As in so off it does not exist. When I get into the office Monday, Internet comes back on.

The internet is where decency, honor, and morality goes to die. Taking a break on the regular to spend time face to face with real people who exist in the same space as you do is vital for mental health and civil society. Taking a break from the online is critical and I encourage it every chance I can get on this soapbox.

Glad you are doing better.

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francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Ask Hubski: Down with Dr. Seuss or this is craziness?

    What was that about death of the artist?

This also deserves a reply. I see the artist and the time they lived in as separate things. George Orwell is a fantastic writer, and I really enjoy his works. However, Orwell's writings are a reflection on him growing up in the shadows of world wars and totalitarianism. If Orwell had been anyone else, writing the same words at the same time in history, they would still reflect time time that he grew up in. I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era. Steinbeck was banned in California for a while, and with good reason. But the stories are fantastic and give a very stylized view of poor people in the 20's and 30's.

KB is probably going to shit all over me for these two replies, but whatever. If we are going to do this thing where we critique art, we should understand the times it was created in. The Artist is but a vessel. If Seuss was writing today as a 30 year old man, would his stories be different? Almost certainly.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era.

I agreed with you wholesale until I read Said. Said's entire point is that Kipling gives you a way to travel back in time and repeat the exact same mistakes of that era. More than that, the canon of works in which white writers encounter foreign cultures is not useful in understanding the white writers, it's useful in perpetuating their prejudices and distaste for foreign cultures.

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Ask Hubski: Down with Dr. Seuss or this is craziness?

My siblings and cousins grew up watching Tom and Jerry. For some of them, the only black skinned person they ever saw on TV was Mammy The thing is, of all the horrible shit kids are exposed to, fiction like Seuss is tame compared to the stuff they threw down my throat. Go find Sunday Bible School materials from the 50's and 60's if you want to really be angry. For that matter, go look into the horrible, terrible propaganda they use in religious homeschooling. In my case, we were raised to believe that Protestants should not be trusted as they turned their backs on the Church that Jesus gave to Saint Peter himself and therefore they had no moral center and were all but fallen demons. Also Protestants are the KKK and will kill you and your parents in your sleep if you are not vigilant.

We live in a very different time. Maybe I am just old, maybe I have other shit to worry about. But in my experience kids know that fiction is not real. And most healthy sane adults will understand in their internal structure of mind that the make-believe is just that: not real. The other thing, something that should really be celebrated, is that your typical 5-7 year old today most certainly interacts with someone that looks, acts, prays, different than they do. When I grew up? everyone looked like me and me family, we all went to the same churches, and everyone in our school was Irish and/or Catholic. Now? As much as I do not like school bussing, it really has made it so that every kid has at least some interaction with someone not like they are. Kids today also play games and talk to people online from other nations, something that when I grew up was unheard of unless you went to the rich people school.

Foreign people are not some odd mystery any more; they are neighbors. The chinese guy in the book probably doesn't even register in most kid's heads because there is a Chinese kid in class with them. I'd be interested in someone asking those questions to kids; I bet the answers would shock all of us (in a good way).

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: February 27, 2019

Well, smack my ass, ready the fainting couch and pass the smelling salts, Kentucky did something right for once.

I work in a hospital. As part of my HR package to work in said hospital I have to have ALL current immunizations, including yearly flu shots, Hep boosters etc. That paperwork is on file with the hospital, my employer and possibly the state regulatory board. My insurance pays for all that. Your note made me look into it, and it turns out that when Kentucky set up its own exchange as a part of "ObamaCare," one of the things they pushed for was preventative care, including all vaccinations. They then aggressively signed people up into the exchange and went around vaccinating people in 2010-2012 time frame. If you have insurance in the state, there is no out-of-pocket for you. Huh.

Something we have to remind people is that a vaccine does not mean you won't get sick. It means you won't get sick enough to spread the virus to other people. And in certain cases, the vaccine won't "take" and you will act as a carrier. We had someone in the Pubski thread talk about getting Rubella. THAT is a disease I never expected to come back. And there are elderly, very young, premies, cancer patients, people on immunosuppressants and others with real health issues that cannot get vaccinated. The more people that get the shot, the better the herd immunity and we can help make those people's lives a little easier.

Can't find the article, but the Kentucky cases came back to the state from a group of religious people that went to South America to evangelize. They came back with Measles and Whooping Cough. Looks like the same in the PNW. Only one more reason to end the religious and "conscientious objector" loopholes for vaccinations. I stand by the statement: If you want to cross a national border or use mass transit, get your damn shots or stay home.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I know just how badly you want this to be about vaccine exemption. It's not.

    The response to the epidemic has been hampered by the recession, which has left state and local health departments on the front lines of defense weakened by years of sustained budget cuts.

    Here in Skagit County, about an hour’s drive north of Seattle — the hardest-hit corner of the state, based on pertussis cases per capita — the local Public Health Department has half the staff it did in 2008. Preventive care programs, intended to keep people healthy, are mostly gone.

    The county’s top medical officer, Dr. Howard Leibrand, who is also a full-time emergency room physician, said that in the crushing triage of a combined health crisis and budget crisis, he had gone so far as to urge local physicians to stop testing patients to confirm a whooping cough diagnosis.

    If the signs are there, he said — especially a persistent, deep cough and indication of contact with a confirmed victim — doctors should simply treat patients with antibiotics. The pertussis test can cost up to $400 and delay treatment by days. About 14.6 percent of Skagit County residents have no health insurance, according to a state study conducted last year, up from 11.6 percent in 2008.

    “There has been half a million dollars spent on testing in this county,” Dr. Leibrand said late last week. “Do you know how much vaccination you can buy for half a million dollars?” And testing, he added, benefits only the epidemiologists, not the patients. “It’s an outrageous way to spend your health care dollar.”

People wanted to get bent outta shape about the anti-vax crowd in 2012, too. They had a bit more of a leg to stand on. Except Washington actually changed their regulations for the better the year before:

    Last year, the Washington Legislature passed a law requiring parents to prove that they had consulted a physician before declining vaccinations for their children.

    “We had the easiest opt-out law in the nation until last year, so what we also had was the highest percent of parents opting out,” Ms. Selecky said.

And I know you want this to be "a group of religious people that went to South America." Except it was eighteen different strains.

    Thirty-one PFGE types were found, with the most common types, CDC013 (n = 51), CDC237 (n = 44), and CDC002 (n = 42), accounting for 57% of them. Eleven MLVA types were observed, mainly comprising type 27 (n = 183, 76%). Seven MLST types were identified, with the majority of the isolates typing as prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1-fim3-1 (n = 157, 65%). Four different prn mutations accounted for the 76% of isolates exhibiting pertactin deficiency.

Listen closely to me, atheist, because you're doing that thing everybody hates us for: proclaiming that proper zealous adherence to dogma will protect our virtue. That's like when people would tell me my kid has a life-threatening peanut allergy because my wife didn't eat enough peanut butter sandwiches when she was pregnant, and then blamed us both for not enrolling her in a peanut allergy study.

You're whistling in the goddamn graveyard and everybody knows it - but worse than that, you're saying parents are to blame for the random misfortunes of their offspring. You know why there's a pertussis outbreak in Kentucky?

    However, Thomas Clark, MD, an epidemiologist with the CDC's meningitis and vaccine-preventable disease branch, told the Times that many people sickened in outbreaks in Washington and other states received their childhood vaccinations, but changes in the vaccine in the early 1990s to reduce side effects may have had an impact on how long immunity lasts.

So if you're under 50 you thought you were vaccinated against pertussis forever but it turns out you were actually only vaccinated against pertussis until about 2008. Stop trying to blame people for that. No. this isn't about crossing national borders. No. This isn't about whether or not you ride the bus. This is about the fact that people get fucking sick sometimes and it's a drag. Kinda like how the flu vaccine is sometimes like 40% effective because it's for the wrong strain.

I dated a girl who worked at a hospital. As part of her HR package she had to be tested for every fuckin' thing under the sun. Turns out she picked up tuberculosis when she was in Spain five years previously. Is there a tuberculosis vaccine? yes. Is it given in the US? no. So are we gonna keep all the brown people out now? or give them all a vaccine scar that never goes away? Or just go ahead and treat everyone? 'cuz that's a six month course with a teratogenic that requires monthly liver function checks and utter abstinence of all alcohol.

Or maybe just accept that in a town called Perfect everyone thinks like you, acts like you, behaves like you and vaccines are 100% effective but here in These United States we can't afford to burn people at the stake for getting sick?

francopoli  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Ask Hubski: Down with Dr. Seuss or this is craziness?

Dr. Seuss also grew up six human generations ago. Back when gay people were legally not-people and killed. Back when interracial marriage was illegal. Back when a black man could be lynched on the suspicion he was out of line. Back when the most distrusted group in the non-south were Catholics. Back when there was no food safety, no environmental protections, rampant poverty, and no public education.

Hell if we are going to do this to literature then there is just about EVERY book written more than a hundred years ago that ends up in the fire. Huck Finn (racism, bigotry). The Three Musketeers (vigilante justice). Romeo and Juliet (pedophilia). Lolita (yikes). Moby Dick (anti environment, no female characters, violence, racism). Frankenstein is a disturbing book about grave robbing and killing people that are different. Everything Steinbeck wrote. Hell, has anyone actually sat down and read the Bible? (hint, we call them atheists.) Name a classic story and we can all be shocked on our twitter feeds about how terrible said book is. We can go on and on and on and on. Or, and here is a radical idea, we teach these books. We encourage people to read them. And then we encourage discussions on how we have moved forward and no longer murder people left and right for being with the people they love. How justice should be as an ideal to strive for. How racist caricatures lead to wars where millions of people died. We learn from the past, get better, move forward or we kill our society. And part of that learning is reading the classics and seeing how far we have come and how far we still need to go.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Here's my point:

I am unconvinced that the world benefits from reading hundred year old books.

Sure. "Classics." But there are lots of books, there are lots of good books, and if we're only going to be able to force these poor fucks to read for twelve years at which point they're lost forever why the hell can't we make them read Judy Blume instead of Charlotte Bronte?

I had a love of literature systematically driven out of me by books that had to be "contextualized" in order to make some fuckin' PTA group happy somewhere - every kid who has to stop down for a day to discuss the n-word in Huck Finn is losing out on a day of Huck Finn. But we aren't even talking about Huck Finn. We're talking about Dr. Seuss.

There are waaaaay better books out there than Dr. Seuss. We can let him go. Really, we can.

galen  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Dr. Seuss also grew up six human generations ago. Back when gay people were legally not-people and killed. Back when interracial marriage was illegal. Back when a black man could be lynched on the suspicion he was out of line. Back when the most distrusted group in the non-south were Catholics. Back when there was no food safety, no environmental protections, rampant poverty, and no public education.

What was that about death of the artist?

    we encourage discussions on how we have moved forward and no longer murder people left and right for being with the people they love. How justice should be as an ideal to strive for. How racist caricatures lead to wars where millions of people died. We learn from the past, get better, move forward or we kill our society. And part of that learning is reading the classics and seeing how far we have come and how far we still need to go.

These are CHILDREN'S BOOKS. Ain't nobody talking about the dangers of racist caricatures when they read "If I Ran the Zoo" with their 2nd graders. High school English class, reading Huck Finn, R&J, and Moby Dick? Absolutely. Have those discussions. Problematize the texts. But recognize that a 7 year old probably isn't ready to deconstruct this.

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    What was that about death of the artist?

This also deserves a reply. I see the artist and the time they lived in as separate things. George Orwell is a fantastic writer, and I really enjoy his works. However, Orwell's writings are a reflection on him growing up in the shadows of world wars and totalitarianism. If Orwell had been anyone else, writing the same words at the same time in history, they would still reflect time time that he grew up in. I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era. Steinbeck was banned in California for a while, and with good reason. But the stories are fantastic and give a very stylized view of poor people in the 20's and 30's.

KB is probably going to shit all over me for these two replies, but whatever. If we are going to do this thing where we critique art, we should understand the times it was created in. The Artist is but a vessel. If Seuss was writing today as a 30 year old man, would his stories be different? Almost certainly.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era.

I agreed with you wholesale until I read Said. Said's entire point is that Kipling gives you a way to travel back in time and repeat the exact same mistakes of that era. More than that, the canon of works in which white writers encounter foreign cultures is not useful in understanding the white writers, it's useful in perpetuating their prejudices and distaste for foreign cultures.

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

My siblings and cousins grew up watching Tom and Jerry. For some of them, the only black skinned person they ever saw on TV was Mammy The thing is, of all the horrible shit kids are exposed to, fiction like Seuss is tame compared to the stuff they threw down my throat. Go find Sunday Bible School materials from the 50's and 60's if you want to really be angry. For that matter, go look into the horrible, terrible propaganda they use in religious homeschooling. In my case, we were raised to believe that Protestants should not be trusted as they turned their backs on the Church that Jesus gave to Saint Peter himself and therefore they had no moral center and were all but fallen demons. Also Protestants are the KKK and will kill you and your parents in your sleep if you are not vigilant.

We live in a very different time. Maybe I am just old, maybe I have other shit to worry about. But in my experience kids know that fiction is not real. And most healthy sane adults will understand in their internal structure of mind that the make-believe is just that: not real. The other thing, something that should really be celebrated, is that your typical 5-7 year old today most certainly interacts with someone that looks, acts, prays, different than they do. When I grew up? everyone looked like me and me family, we all went to the same churches, and everyone in our school was Irish and/or Catholic. Now? As much as I do not like school bussing, it really has made it so that every kid has at least some interaction with someone not like they are. Kids today also play games and talk to people online from other nations, something that when I grew up was unheard of unless you went to the rich people school.

Foreign people are not some odd mystery any more; they are neighbors. The chinese guy in the book probably doesn't even register in most kid's heads because there is a Chinese kid in class with them. I'd be interested in someone asking those questions to kids; I bet the answers would shock all of us (in a good way).

francopoli  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: February 27, 2019

There is a whooping cough epidemic brewing in Kentucky. Vaccinate your fucking kids. Seriously, fight the assholes sending us back to the dark ages where we buried half our children.

If I could snap my fingers and be god? You would not be able to cross a national border without proof of current up to date vaccinations. You'd not be able to get on a plane, cruise ship etc without a current vaccine card.

Social media is dragging the human race backwards. I grew up down the street from polio survivors. I lived through chicken pox assemblies. Fuck you with a microbiology textbook if you want to go back to this shit.

I was promised flying cars and moon bases. Instead I get measles and this dysfunction we call a government. I demand a do-over.

kleinbl00  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hi, there. I had pertussis in 2015. It sucked. I've never missed a vaccination.

Know how I had pertussis in 2015? Because they recommend Tdap every ten years but your insurance probably doesn't cover it because as an adult, pertussis isn't a life-threatening illness. So chances are you don't even have a vaccination. And if you did, it's probably not in your records anyway so the insurance is going to say "prove you needed this" so your clinic isn't even gonna offer it to you because it's a solid money loser. So if you know anyone with a cough, and you spend any time with them, guess what? You've got pertussis. And you don't know it's pertussis until you go "holy shit why have I been coughing uncontrollably for six weeks?" And by the way by the time you've been coughing hard enough to break a rib, you're no longer contagious. The rib-breakers are you hacking up your dead alveoli. That's why it's gonna take you two months to get batter. You're literally regrowing your lungs. But yeah. That cold you had a month ago? It was actually whooping cough and now you've given it to every adult you know who also doesn't know what whooping cough is other than guessing you probably can't get it from eating margarine.

The anti-vax folx love pox parties. They think they should have them all the time. They do all sorts of silly shit. Of course what the medical establishment wants you to do is vaccinate against varicella but you gotta dig deep as to why; fundamentally it's because the antibiotic-resistant bacteria we've grown for the past 50 years take pox from "itchy thing" to "MRSA vector" and since you're coming to the hospital with your highly-infectious pox they don't want you leaving with flesh-eating bacteria.

Look.

I get that everyone with an ounce of science wants to beat somebody up. I get that the IFLS posse hates the anti-vaxers the way 4chan hates furries. But fuckin' slow your roll. Epidemiology and public health aren't as simple as "vaccinate your fucking kids". Yeah. Totes do that. But your own goddamn link says nothing about vaccinating adults because nobody does.

And even when you're vaccinated you can still get goddamn whooping cough.

    Valid vaccination history was available for 1,829 of 2,006 (91.2%) patients aged 3 months–19 years. Overall, 758 of 1,000 (75.8%) patients aged 3 months–10 years were up-to-date with the childhood diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) doses. Receipt of Tdap was documented in 97 of 225 (43.1%) patients aged 11–12 years and in 466 of 604 (77.2%) patients aged 13–19 years. Estimated DTaP coverage in Washington among children aged 19–35 months was 93.2% for ≥3 doses and 81.9% for ≥4 doses in 2010; Tdap coverage in adolescents aged 13–17 years was estimated at 70.6% (3).
francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Well, smack my ass, ready the fainting couch and pass the smelling salts, Kentucky did something right for once.

I work in a hospital. As part of my HR package to work in said hospital I have to have ALL current immunizations, including yearly flu shots, Hep boosters etc. That paperwork is on file with the hospital, my employer and possibly the state regulatory board. My insurance pays for all that. Your note made me look into it, and it turns out that when Kentucky set up its own exchange as a part of "ObamaCare," one of the things they pushed for was preventative care, including all vaccinations. They then aggressively signed people up into the exchange and went around vaccinating people in 2010-2012 time frame. If you have insurance in the state, there is no out-of-pocket for you. Huh.

Something we have to remind people is that a vaccine does not mean you won't get sick. It means you won't get sick enough to spread the virus to other people. And in certain cases, the vaccine won't "take" and you will act as a carrier. We had someone in the Pubski thread talk about getting Rubella. THAT is a disease I never expected to come back. And there are elderly, very young, premies, cancer patients, people on immunosuppressants and others with real health issues that cannot get vaccinated. The more people that get the shot, the better the herd immunity and we can help make those people's lives a little easier.

Can't find the article, but the Kentucky cases came back to the state from a group of religious people that went to South America to evangelize. They came back with Measles and Whooping Cough. Looks like the same in the PNW. Only one more reason to end the religious and "conscientious objector" loopholes for vaccinations. I stand by the statement: If you want to cross a national border or use mass transit, get your damn shots or stay home.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I know just how badly you want this to be about vaccine exemption. It's not.

    The response to the epidemic has been hampered by the recession, which has left state and local health departments on the front lines of defense weakened by years of sustained budget cuts.

    Here in Skagit County, about an hour’s drive north of Seattle — the hardest-hit corner of the state, based on pertussis cases per capita — the local Public Health Department has half the staff it did in 2008. Preventive care programs, intended to keep people healthy, are mostly gone.

    The county’s top medical officer, Dr. Howard Leibrand, who is also a full-time emergency room physician, said that in the crushing triage of a combined health crisis and budget crisis, he had gone so far as to urge local physicians to stop testing patients to confirm a whooping cough diagnosis.

    If the signs are there, he said — especially a persistent, deep cough and indication of contact with a confirmed victim — doctors should simply treat patients with antibiotics. The pertussis test can cost up to $400 and delay treatment by days. About 14.6 percent of Skagit County residents have no health insurance, according to a state study conducted last year, up from 11.6 percent in 2008.

    “There has been half a million dollars spent on testing in this county,” Dr. Leibrand said late last week. “Do you know how much vaccination you can buy for half a million dollars?” And testing, he added, benefits only the epidemiologists, not the patients. “It’s an outrageous way to spend your health care dollar.”

People wanted to get bent outta shape about the anti-vax crowd in 2012, too. They had a bit more of a leg to stand on. Except Washington actually changed their regulations for the better the year before:

    Last year, the Washington Legislature passed a law requiring parents to prove that they had consulted a physician before declining vaccinations for their children.

    “We had the easiest opt-out law in the nation until last year, so what we also had was the highest percent of parents opting out,” Ms. Selecky said.

And I know you want this to be "a group of religious people that went to South America." Except it was eighteen different strains.

    Thirty-one PFGE types were found, with the most common types, CDC013 (n = 51), CDC237 (n = 44), and CDC002 (n = 42), accounting for 57% of them. Eleven MLVA types were observed, mainly comprising type 27 (n = 183, 76%). Seven MLST types were identified, with the majority of the isolates typing as prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1-fim3-1 (n = 157, 65%). Four different prn mutations accounted for the 76% of isolates exhibiting pertactin deficiency.

Listen closely to me, atheist, because you're doing that thing everybody hates us for: proclaiming that proper zealous adherence to dogma will protect our virtue. That's like when people would tell me my kid has a life-threatening peanut allergy because my wife didn't eat enough peanut butter sandwiches when she was pregnant, and then blamed us both for not enrolling her in a peanut allergy study.

You're whistling in the goddamn graveyard and everybody knows it - but worse than that, you're saying parents are to blame for the random misfortunes of their offspring. You know why there's a pertussis outbreak in Kentucky?

    However, Thomas Clark, MD, an epidemiologist with the CDC's meningitis and vaccine-preventable disease branch, told the Times that many people sickened in outbreaks in Washington and other states received their childhood vaccinations, but changes in the vaccine in the early 1990s to reduce side effects may have had an impact on how long immunity lasts.

So if you're under 50 you thought you were vaccinated against pertussis forever but it turns out you were actually only vaccinated against pertussis until about 2008. Stop trying to blame people for that. No. this isn't about crossing national borders. No. This isn't about whether or not you ride the bus. This is about the fact that people get fucking sick sometimes and it's a drag. Kinda like how the flu vaccine is sometimes like 40% effective because it's for the wrong strain.

I dated a girl who worked at a hospital. As part of her HR package she had to be tested for every fuckin' thing under the sun. Turns out she picked up tuberculosis when she was in Spain five years previously. Is there a tuberculosis vaccine? yes. Is it given in the US? no. So are we gonna keep all the brown people out now? or give them all a vaccine scar that never goes away? Or just go ahead and treat everyone? 'cuz that's a six month course with a teratogenic that requires monthly liver function checks and utter abstinence of all alcohol.

Or maybe just accept that in a town called Perfect everyone thinks like you, acts like you, behaves like you and vaccines are 100% effective but here in These United States we can't afford to burn people at the stake for getting sick?

Devac  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    And even when you're vaccinated you can still get goddamn whooping cough.

Same goes for chickenpox and rubella. I know the former from the same source I know the latter.

francopoli  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Who Is Left on Hubski?

    Age: Almost 25... somehow it feels I should have it a little more together by now.

Cue the old man laugh. Having your shit together sounds boring.

francopoli  ·  51 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Who Is Left on Hubski?

I'm not dead yet, not for lack of the universe holding a grudge. Everything exciting and interesting I am doing is buried under legal teams and NDA paperwork. Health sucks, but at least I'll be dead before the icecaps melt.

Holy hell, I have to start thinking of a 2000 day post. Time fucking flies.

francopoli  ·  51 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Ask Hubski: Down with Dr. Seuss or this is craziness?

Death of the artist, people.

Ted Geisel was not a good person. The stuff with his wife went down in the periphery of my family friend circles. I have signed books, I have signed portraits and landscapes of his from the 40's and 30's as he took off, and I consider this stuff treasures because Geisel and my grandfather's family were acquaintances; Dr. Seuss' books and drawings reminds me of him and my grandmother. The family rumor is that the Geisel's bought their house from one of my great uncles, but I've never had that verified, then again I don't really care either. Grandpa did stuff in WWII that crossed paths with Geisel, that is all I know with certainty.

I also find it odd that people are criticizing him for his portrayal of Japanese people... IN WAR PROPAGANDA.

Is the Dr. Seuss stuff good? I think so. is Megadeth's music good? I think so. Both bits of art I enjoy were created by shitstain people.

galen  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    In a study published earlier this month in Research on Diversity in Youth Literature, researchers Katie Ishizuka and Ramon Stephens found that only 2 percent of the human characters in Seuss' books were people of color. And all of those characters, they say, were "depicted through racist caricatures."

This has nothing to do with the death of the artist. It's about the content of the books, and the effect that that content has on the kids who read them—not about whether Ted Geisel was a good guy or not.

francopoli  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Dr. Seuss also grew up six human generations ago. Back when gay people were legally not-people and killed. Back when interracial marriage was illegal. Back when a black man could be lynched on the suspicion he was out of line. Back when the most distrusted group in the non-south were Catholics. Back when there was no food safety, no environmental protections, rampant poverty, and no public education.

Hell if we are going to do this to literature then there is just about EVERY book written more than a hundred years ago that ends up in the fire. Huck Finn (racism, bigotry). The Three Musketeers (vigilante justice). Romeo and Juliet (pedophilia). Lolita (yikes). Moby Dick (anti environment, no female characters, violence, racism). Frankenstein is a disturbing book about grave robbing and killing people that are different. Everything Steinbeck wrote. Hell, has anyone actually sat down and read the Bible? (hint, we call them atheists.) Name a classic story and we can all be shocked on our twitter feeds about how terrible said book is. We can go on and on and on and on. Or, and here is a radical idea, we teach these books. We encourage people to read them. And then we encourage discussions on how we have moved forward and no longer murder people left and right for being with the people they love. How justice should be as an ideal to strive for. How racist caricatures lead to wars where millions of people died. We learn from the past, get better, move forward or we kill our society. And part of that learning is reading the classics and seeing how far we have come and how far we still need to go.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Here's my point:

I am unconvinced that the world benefits from reading hundred year old books.

Sure. "Classics." But there are lots of books, there are lots of good books, and if we're only going to be able to force these poor fucks to read for twelve years at which point they're lost forever why the hell can't we make them read Judy Blume instead of Charlotte Bronte?

I had a love of literature systematically driven out of me by books that had to be "contextualized" in order to make some fuckin' PTA group happy somewhere - every kid who has to stop down for a day to discuss the n-word in Huck Finn is losing out on a day of Huck Finn. But we aren't even talking about Huck Finn. We're talking about Dr. Seuss.

There are waaaaay better books out there than Dr. Seuss. We can let him go. Really, we can.

galen  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Dr. Seuss also grew up six human generations ago. Back when gay people were legally not-people and killed. Back when interracial marriage was illegal. Back when a black man could be lynched on the suspicion he was out of line. Back when the most distrusted group in the non-south were Catholics. Back when there was no food safety, no environmental protections, rampant poverty, and no public education.

What was that about death of the artist?

    we encourage discussions on how we have moved forward and no longer murder people left and right for being with the people they love. How justice should be as an ideal to strive for. How racist caricatures lead to wars where millions of people died. We learn from the past, get better, move forward or we kill our society. And part of that learning is reading the classics and seeing how far we have come and how far we still need to go.

These are CHILDREN'S BOOKS. Ain't nobody talking about the dangers of racist caricatures when they read "If I Ran the Zoo" with their 2nd graders. High school English class, reading Huck Finn, R&J, and Moby Dick? Absolutely. Have those discussions. Problematize the texts. But recognize that a 7 year old probably isn't ready to deconstruct this.

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    What was that about death of the artist?

This also deserves a reply. I see the artist and the time they lived in as separate things. George Orwell is a fantastic writer, and I really enjoy his works. However, Orwell's writings are a reflection on him growing up in the shadows of world wars and totalitarianism. If Orwell had been anyone else, writing the same words at the same time in history, they would still reflect time time that he grew up in. I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era. Steinbeck was banned in California for a while, and with good reason. But the stories are fantastic and give a very stylized view of poor people in the 20's and 30's.

KB is probably going to shit all over me for these two replies, but whatever. If we are going to do this thing where we critique art, we should understand the times it was created in. The Artist is but a vessel. If Seuss was writing today as a 30 year old man, would his stories be different? Almost certainly.

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I like the stories that Rudyard Kipling produced, but man is some of that stuff seriously dated, racist by today's standards and out of line with modern sensibilities. He writing gives us a way to travel back in time and understand that era.

I agreed with you wholesale until I read Said. Said's entire point is that Kipling gives you a way to travel back in time and repeat the exact same mistakes of that era. More than that, the canon of works in which white writers encounter foreign cultures is not useful in understanding the white writers, it's useful in perpetuating their prejudices and distaste for foreign cultures.

francopoli  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

My siblings and cousins grew up watching Tom and Jerry. For some of them, the only black skinned person they ever saw on TV was Mammy The thing is, of all the horrible shit kids are exposed to, fiction like Seuss is tame compared to the stuff they threw down my throat. Go find Sunday Bible School materials from the 50's and 60's if you want to really be angry. For that matter, go look into the horrible, terrible propaganda they use in religious homeschooling. In my case, we were raised to believe that Protestants should not be trusted as they turned their backs on the Church that Jesus gave to Saint Peter himself and therefore they had no moral center and were all but fallen demons. Also Protestants are the KKK and will kill you and your parents in your sleep if you are not vigilant.

We live in a very different time. Maybe I am just old, maybe I have other shit to worry about. But in my experience kids know that fiction is not real. And most healthy sane adults will understand in their internal structure of mind that the make-believe is just that: not real. The other thing, something that should really be celebrated, is that your typical 5-7 year old today most certainly interacts with someone that looks, acts, prays, different than they do. When I grew up? everyone looked like me and me family, we all went to the same churches, and everyone in our school was Irish and/or Catholic. Now? As much as I do not like school bussing, it really has made it so that every kid has at least some interaction with someone not like they are. Kids today also play games and talk to people online from other nations, something that when I grew up was unheard of unless you went to the rich people school.

Foreign people are not some odd mystery any more; they are neighbors. The chinese guy in the book probably doesn't even register in most kid's heads because there is a Chinese kid in class with them. I'd be interested in someone asking those questions to kids; I bet the answers would shock all of us (in a good way).

francopoli  ·  53 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What do you do when you think you hear abuse in an apartment complex?

Not my circus, not my monkeys.

Unless they are fighting out in public? White nights get killed; take the two warring factions and add an outside aggressor, now you have two belligerents with YOU as the target. Nothing is anonymous any more. Want to "do something?" Call in a noise complaint. Someone dying from a stab would? call. Gunshots? call. Shit being destroyed in the unit? Yea, ok, call. Shouting? eh...

I've lived in the rat-infested slumlord-owned properties. I was lucky in that my neighbors were all divorced dads with two jobs, immigrants (mostly illegal, but some legal) that wanted nothing to do with anyone, and poor-ass people like me that just wanted to be left alone after work. Gunshots in the area were not rare. Make friendly chatter, hell make friends with if possible, the adjoining units. People who don't see you as a stranger will treat you better and not stomp on the walls at 3AM when the weed and shit runs out, etc.

People are bastard covered cunts with a frothy shit center, man. Its not really any better in the richer parts of town, either. Same people just more resources.