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elizabeth's comments

Could it be a wink to an upcoming claim that the election was rigged by write in voters and they want a re-count? Moore did not admit defeat on his livestream and says to wait until the « final count » hoping for that 0.5% margin recount (that’s not gonna happen)

Congrats on barely not electing a pedophile my Alabamian friends :)

elizabeth  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Robot rampage game

There'a a secret one!? Damn, I need to play a couple more times then.

Yeah, I'm saying in a generation or 2 being vegan and/or eating lab grown meat will be the norm. And some old people are gonna cling on to the meat eating and defend it as the proper way of doing things. And talk about how back in our day, everyone wasn't a pussy that eats grass. But eh, that's what happens with all big societal changes.

True, it's really embarrassing but I feel people don't have that much of an attachement to their fosil-fuelled cars and would gladly switch to electric anytime. Sure, there are some car enthusiasts out there but it's more of a sub-culture than a widespread feeling (at least where i'm from). Maybe I'm underestimating Mid-America's love for derby demolition, but I don't know that much about that part of the world. My mom would not even notice if I swapped out her SUV to a Sedan as long as it stays the same color. People are suuuuper defensive about their eating habits. I think you'd have more of an uprising banning soft drinks than banning all fosil fuelled cars.

My friends threw in our "gender binary" point of view on gender as another thing our generation will cling on to and be looked upon unfavourably for. Who knows!

kleinbl00  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

People are defensive of changes outside of culture. "I am a vegetarian" is a personal choice; "we're all vegetarians now" is a social shift.

In 2004, my wife discovered that wheat gives her eczema. She's an ardent baker; suddenly the constant cracks on her hands and lips made a lot of sense. So she gave up wheat back when it was a few random celiacs and her. Then a whole groundswell of people also gave up wheat (for good or questionable reasons; not getting into that here) and over time things got a lot easier. In 2005 I had to call ahead to the weird bakery that ran out of the back of a tea shop to get enough gluten-free bread to make stuffing. In 2013 I could buy Udi's at the local supermarket. Now, I go out to bars and have to be cautioned by the servers "you should know that one's gluten free" when I order a beer.

People like to eat what tastes good and what they can afford. Food is much trendier than you think. Last week I was walking around looking for chocolate wafers for a cheesecake and found myself saying "holy shit, Snackwells" when I saw some of those wretched little devil's food cookies. I hadn't seen them in a decade; when I was in college they were half an aisle.

I've been telling people us non-vegans are gonna be on the wrong side of history sooner rather than later. Same as you have a racist grandmother now, we're gonna be the backwards meat-eaters to our grandchildren. Grasping at straws and pseudo-science. Saying we're supposed to be eating dead animal flesh... because that's the way it's always been and it's human nature.

But my stupid rationalizing ass has been thinking that's an extra reason to eat as much tartare as I can, before it's outlawed in 20 years.

kleinbl00  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

History will acknowledge that "vegan" was not a practical or pragmatic choice until recently. It still remains a philosophical choice available largely to the wealthy... or a necessity experienced largely by the poor.

The developed nations aren't outliers; there's a pretty steady correlation between available wealth and available meat.

The future will have less meat. The future will also have more viable meat alternatives. We don't look at the denizens of Victorian London as backwards defilers of the environment; we look at them as victims of circumstance. It'll be weird for children of the future to think that we used to eat bacon from the stomachs of pigs and drank milk that was harvested from cows but they won't blame us for it.

elizabeth  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Yeah, I'm saying in a generation or 2 being vegan and/or eating lab grown meat will be the norm. And some old people are gonna cling on to the meat eating and defend it as the proper way of doing things. And talk about how back in our day, everyone wasn't a pussy that eats grass. But eh, that's what happens with all big societal changes.

snoodog  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Also raw tuna. Eat lots before they are extinct and/or banned

OftenBen  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Tank-grown tuna will be a thing long before the Japanese (And myself) stop eating otoro.

WanderingEng  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I think we'll be even more embarrassed by fossil fuels, particularly coal and oil extraction, loud, shouty cars that serve no social good, and the concept of just going for a drive. With time we may be embarrassed by all fossil fuel use, but there is some low hanging fruit we should be embarrassed by today.

elizabeth  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

True, it's really embarrassing but I feel people don't have that much of an attachement to their fosil-fuelled cars and would gladly switch to electric anytime. Sure, there are some car enthusiasts out there but it's more of a sub-culture than a widespread feeling (at least where i'm from). Maybe I'm underestimating Mid-America's love for derby demolition, but I don't know that much about that part of the world. My mom would not even notice if I swapped out her SUV to a Sedan as long as it stays the same color. People are suuuuper defensive about their eating habits. I think you'd have more of an uprising banning soft drinks than banning all fosil fuelled cars.

My friends threw in our "gender binary" point of view on gender as another thing our generation will cling on to and be looked upon unfavourably for. Who knows!

kleinbl00  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·  

People are defensive of changes outside of culture. "I am a vegetarian" is a personal choice; "we're all vegetarians now" is a social shift.

In 2004, my wife discovered that wheat gives her eczema. She's an ardent baker; suddenly the constant cracks on her hands and lips made a lot of sense. So she gave up wheat back when it was a few random celiacs and her. Then a whole groundswell of people also gave up wheat (for good or questionable reasons; not getting into that here) and over time things got a lot easier. In 2005 I had to call ahead to the weird bakery that ran out of the back of a tea shop to get enough gluten-free bread to make stuffing. In 2013 I could buy Udi's at the local supermarket. Now, I go out to bars and have to be cautioned by the servers "you should know that one's gluten free" when I order a beer.

People like to eat what tastes good and what they can afford. Food is much trendier than you think. Last week I was walking around looking for chocolate wafers for a cheesecake and found myself saying "holy shit, Snackwells" when I saw some of those wretched little devil's food cookies. I hadn't seen them in a decade; when I was in college they were half an aisle.

So are you saying Trump should build a zigzag fence?

That's actually a super interesting fact about castle building, I'll pay more attention to that next time I'm somewhere with enough history to have had castles.

kleinbl00  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

The zigzag aspect of it is a function of fortification. They're pointy like that because there's no "lee" under the turret to hide in and because everywhere you can approach it, you can be shot at from somewhere they're defended.

Obviously if you could just pound the shit out of it with cannon you'd be golden but around that fortification is a ditch where they get to kill you, then a moat, then a glacis which is angled to deflect cannon fire.

Obviously this can get iterative - moat/glacis/scarp/parapet/moat/parapet/etc until the only way either side can move is if one side starves the other out.

Trump's tax plan is going to do a lot of starving the other out.

bfv  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Trump's tax plan is going to do a lot of starving the other out.

I feel that this analogy needs more of the general of the besieging army having episodes and setting his own side's supplies on fire.

kleinbl00  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  
rd95  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If forts count, Canada has some pretty cool ones.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_forts#Canada

Clicking around randomly, Fort Beausejour was a star shaped fort. Sadly, all that are left are some ruins.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Beaus%C3%A9jour

kleinbl00  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Their little map is pretty funny too!

kleinbl00  ·  11 days ago  ·  link  ·  

- Walls have been militarily obsolete since the invention of gunpowder

This is just not true enough in just the right kind of way that it deserves mention. While obviously a castle with vertical walls loses a lot of effectiveness against cannon balls, Europe was not about to give up so easily. Fortification and European society went hand-in-hand so well that Europe simply started building different castles.

Without getting really boring about this because it's already an obnoxious digression, star forts were such a bitch to attack and design that artisans from foreign countries were brought in and professional mercenaries were hired to attack them, effectively giving rise to a middle class that weren't serfs and weren't royals. As the cost of laying siege to an effective star fort became ruinous, diplomacy and alliances replaced the feudal warfare of the Middle ages. And as diplomacy and alliances replaced feudal warfare, the star forts mostly went away.

Sorry. Carry on. I just find these sorts of things fascinating.

veen  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Without getting really boring about this because it's already an obnoxious digression

Unnecessary further digression in 3...2...

----

I also find historic fortifications fascinating, but for different reasons. One of the reasons is that I just love staring at old city maps:

I used to live in this city. Actually, I can point to the specific patch of grass on that map from 1649 where someone built a residence in the 1700s (which burned down and was rebuilt in the 1890s) that I called home. About a year ago the Dutch land registration agency created a site that's "Google Maps but with time travel"; you can pick any place in the Netherlands and browse through 200 years of maps with the slider. Here's the same city as above . What I love to do is to navigate to a place I know and to find out how it developed over the decades. How do those fortifications of yore shape the cities of today?

As you mention, at a certain point the fortifications were no longer necessary. This meant that cities could finally expand in all directions without requiring expensive new fortifications to be made. For a lot of cities, it meant that housing was built right on top of old fortification structures, completely erasing that history. Berlin and Paris, for example, had a large number of bastions but you'd be hard-pressed to find traces of that today.

Interestingly, Dutch cities have often preserved some of that old fortification structure. Instead of filling up the old moats with sand and building more housing, many cities (Amsterdam is a good example) still have their canals and original moats. This is largely because the law that legislated good fortification got abolished in 1874 coincided with the advent of city planning. The completely market-driven approach to urban growth was replaced with the first real city-wide plans. So lots of fortifications were redesigned as parks, mostly for the elite:

...or as places for those elites to build mansions. Notice the bastion-shape? Those houses are still the most expensive ones in the city.

Another thing that coincided was the advent of rail transportation. The first railway lines went to the edge of the fort and not much further. Some stations were designed but nothing particularly extravagant. The de-fortification of 1874 however, allowed the new city planners to build a much larger train station much closer to the city center. Which is why a bunch of cities like Amsterdam, Haarlem and Leiden have a train station that is built on top of or just within the old fortifications.

And if your elites are particularly rich, well, why not splurge on an awesome new train station?

elizabeth  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

So are you saying Trump should build a zigzag fence?

That's actually a super interesting fact about castle building, I'll pay more attention to that next time I'm somewhere with enough history to have had castles.

kleinbl00  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

The zigzag aspect of it is a function of fortification. They're pointy like that because there's no "lee" under the turret to hide in and because everywhere you can approach it, you can be shot at from somewhere they're defended.

Obviously if you could just pound the shit out of it with cannon you'd be golden but around that fortification is a ditch where they get to kill you, then a moat, then a glacis which is angled to deflect cannon fire.

Obviously this can get iterative - moat/glacis/scarp/parapet/moat/parapet/etc until the only way either side can move is if one side starves the other out.

Trump's tax plan is going to do a lot of starving the other out.

bfv  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Trump's tax plan is going to do a lot of starving the other out.

I feel that this analogy needs more of the general of the besieging army having episodes and setting his own side's supplies on fire.

kleinbl00  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  
rd95  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

If forts count, Canada has some pretty cool ones.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_forts#Canada

Clicking around randomly, Fort Beausejour was a star shaped fort. Sadly, all that are left are some ruins.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Beaus%C3%A9jour

kleinbl00  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  
johan  ·  10 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I just finished a book on Swedish architecture 1000-1800, this unbuilt fortification plan by Erik Dahlbergh from 1680 for Landskrona I found fascinating. The plan was to make it the southern capital after the annexation of Scania.

elizabeth  ·  13 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 29, 2017

Good luck! I love listening to Moth stories. It was actually my secret gettaway time at Burning man, when I needed to chill out by myself. Found the open mic and would just chill there drinking beer and listening for hours during the burning heat of the day.

I wish I could hear yours :)

elizabeth  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 29, 2017

I've been editing my Portugal mini-series!

Also been procrastinating on a lot of thing I need to do in favour of hanging out with friends. Almost feels like I forgot how to be productive? Gonna try to not let it spiral into a loop of netflix watching with is what usually happens when I decide to stay home to do some work I don't feel like doing.

Edit: got an e-mail from the company I photographed for in the summer, offering a 2 month contract, all expenses paid driving around suppliers collecting data for 10 000$. On one hand, I just got back and really don't want to leave. On the other, that's a loooot of money. And it's not really like I have anything productive to do instead, I just want to hang out with my friends for a while...

elizabeth  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 29, 2017

I feel like Old Fashioneds have been a more and more common occurrence on drink menus lately. In the hipster universe I live in, "classic" cocktails are really making a comeback. But most often you're either at a cocktail bar where you're better off trying one of their house mixes (that's gonna set you back 18$ if your friends drag you to a trendy speakeasy) , or you're at a non cocktail place where you gotta play it safe with a gin tonic or a tom collins if feeling adventurous...

elizabeth  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 29, 2017

I gotchu fam!

(low light speakeasies are are not the best for selfies)

I gotta admit Steve's pretty intense, he's one of the most energetic people I know. And the fact that he shares my love of messing with Hind kinda made us spiral out of control. I swear I can be laid back too! Had a good time at the concert too, you got good taste in music :)

elizabeth  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 15, 2017

Good point :) I'll make the effort to do that

elizabeth  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 15, 2017

In Portugal for my dad’s 70th birthday. It’s really beautiful here. Feeling like a spoiled brat when my parents bankroll the vacation like this... but then I’m addicted to travel and enjoy spending time with them. I think I got to work a little harder to pay for myself the next time. To alleviate the guilt a little.

goobster  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Or, alternately, you could thank them for their generosity, and enjoy their gift to the fullest.

The hardest part about gifts is not giving them, it is receiving them fully.

Think like this: Why did they pay for your trip? So you would be there with them. They want your company. They want their daughter to share the experience with them.

The greatest way for you to appreciate their gift is to fully enjoy it, rather than beating yourself up for some self-perceived failure on your part.

Feeling guilty about receiving their gift, takes away from their enjoyment of the gift.

Halcyon talks about the Gifting Economy at Burning Man, and kinda nails it:

elizabeth  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Good point :) I'll make the effort to do that

elizabeth  ·  27 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: November 15, 2017

Nice! It's really nice someone decided to do that :) I think it's going to be really useful for future clients to be able to research your company and stumble upon an unbiased testimonial like this