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applewood  ·  6 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Target raised wages. Then it cut workers' hours and doubled their workload

The r/target thread for this article. Some of those comments. Man.

applewood  ·  7 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski Craft Fair v3.0 - February 27, 2020

Shoot. My only regret is that I only have enough time, money, and attention for just sewing and bookbinding and drawing. There's so much cool stuff out there to do!

applewood  ·  10 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski Craft Fair v3.0 - February 27, 2020

You know, I was gonna have more to share today, images and all, with more work done and all. Funny thing is, there’s this thing called “life” and sometimes it’s really inconvenient and gets in the way of all the fun stuff you wanna do. So this’ll be a little light today, but hopefully next week, I’ll have more to share.

What you’re looking at here is me doing a grain test on the two newest papers I have to work with. What I’m doing is wetting the edges to see which direction the grain goes, which it runs perpendicular to the edge that curls when wet. Normally a grain test can be done just by flexing the paper in your hands, to see which side direction flexes easier than the other, but since both papers are 20lb (about as thin as printing paper gets), there’s not enough substance there to get a good feel for flexing. So I have to resort to the water test. The grain is important, because you want the paper to be folded along the grain, to be bound along the grain, to have the grain match up with your coverboards, etc. all to allow the paper to flex with minimal strain when in use as well as to “breathe” with changing levels of temperature and humidity over time.

I kind of love and hate both these papers. The white one, is actually pretty awesome. It’s a 25% cotton, 20lb business paper with a real nice texture that’s on both sides, which is great. A lot of the time with business papers, especially if they’re linen or laid textured, the texture is only on the front face of the paper and the back face has a non-matching, often smooth texture. This stuff though? It’s pretty sweet. There’s 500 sheets in the box, so if I cut the papers in half, that gives me 4000 pages to work with (minus the paper I mess up and end up using as scrap). Overall, it’s really nice. The only downside to this paper are the obnoxious watermarks on every sheet, which I’ll show you in a second.

The brown paper? I also like. Mostly. It’s got a good visual texture and each sheet is different because there’s all sorts of inclusions in the paper, little specks. Unfortunately, when I got it, I was kind of hoping it’d have a texture similar to paper bags, because it’s supposed to be “kraft paper.” However, it’s as smooth as regular printing paper, so that real nice physical texture I was hoping for just isn’t there. But, it’s paper, it’s unique, and I’m still gonna use it. I have 200 sheets of these, so all cut up and all, I’m gonna get 800 pages out of these bad boys.

Here’s the business paper where I outlined where the watermark is. This is a full, 8.5x11 sheet of paper. As you can tell, it takes up a lot of space. If it’s obnoxious as a full sheet, I can only imagine it’s gonna be even worse when I cut the sheets down to 8.5x5.5.

. . . yeah. No me gusta.

So the day I took these pictures, I did a bunch of cutting. Then I folded. And folded. And folded. And folded. Which sounds tedious, because it is, but kind of like sewing, it’s also really relaxing. Eventually, after a lot of folding, I end up with stacks of paper like this.

Each section consists of four sheets, which have four sides, so there’s sixteen pages to a section. Put anywhere between eight to twelve sections in a book, and you have a lot of blank pages to work with. I did a bunch of punching and sewing, putting together text blocks to be bound. I didn’t take any pictures, because I was too in the zone. But the end results end up looking like this . . .

Which is fun and all. I’m running into a bit of a snag though, in that I have about a dozen or so text blocks full of blank pages that still need to be cased into books and by the time I’m done with this paper, I’ll have another dozen or so. I’m running out of people to give journals too. I’m legit half thinking of making a little box, writing “Free Journals! Please Take Only One and Enjoy” on it, and dropping it off on a college campus or library or something somewhere. I don’t know if there’d be any takers though.

Anyhow, a while back I was thinking about buying cheap paperbacks and rebinding them using the double fan binding method. The problem is, I lack the proper workspace to hold the proper tools I need to do such a thing. Even worse is though, double fan binding, while better than plain old perfect binding, still isn’t the sturdiest way to bind books, so they’re gonna eventually fall apart with use.

So what I’ve been thinking about doing, is going onto places like Project Gutenberg or whatever, and downloading classic, public domain texts of books and stories I enjoy. There’s a few PDF programs out there where I can convert them into the proper layouts for printing them out, cutting them, and converting them into books. I could go that route. There’s a bit of an extra cost involved though so I don’t know. While it wouldn’t be super expensive, it would be more expensive than just buying plain old paperbacks and converting them to hard cover. But man, I tell you, sewn text blocks just hold up better. So I dunno.

Anyhow, that’s me this week. Keep making stuff, guys. I like seeing what you’re all doing.

kingmudsy  ·  9 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

    I’m running out of people to give journals too

I will set up a fucking dead drop in the desert if I need to, my guy. Speaking as a recent college grad, though, you'd run out of journals within an hour if you did the take-one approach and put it somewhere prominent (library, union, etc.)!

I really liked your post this week, I'd somehow forgotten that you were into bookbinding as well as sewing. It seems to be a pretty craft-light week, and I'm not about to turn my nose up at new content!

applewood  ·  7 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Shoot. My only regret is that I only have enough time, money, and attention for just sewing and bookbinding and drawing. There's so much cool stuff out there to do!

applewood  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Please share buggy Hubski things here.

Clicking to see who follows a tag leads go an HTML page with user names instead of a drop down menu. Don't know if that counts as a bug (or even a big deal, really), but I thought it's worth a mention just in case.

mk  ·  11 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Thanks. I’ll fix it.

Let me tell you something. Know how all these companies say "If there is an issue with how automation is affecting workers, they can appeal to management." That's a complete and utter lie. Management is practically automated at this point too. "The system is working the way it's supposed to" or "I'm sorry, in this instance, there's nothing I can do. My hands are tied." You'll hear excuse and lie after excuse and lie because management is disincetivized to care, by the systems they work with, corporate culture, or the very fact that good and empathetic managers have left these garbage companies in droves and all that are left are spineless, witless, gutless goons who shirk responsibility and empathy and commitment whenever possible.

Work for a place like what's described here, go above and beyond for six months straight, never come in late or miss a shift, work extra, and then try to take a day off work because your dog is sick or your car broke down or your landlord is being shady and you gotta take care of it and they'll just take a giant piss all over you and your work ethic and your human dignity.

Cause it's not about the worker anymore. It's about the system. And the system? It's fucking GARBAGE.

applewood  ·  22 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Time Travel

It's all good bro. No worries. I was just making a bit of noise.

CodeeKid  ·  18 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

HAHA

Hope you have a lekker day

applewood  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Holy wack

    life itself is just jail when you think about it

I vehemently disagree. If that's how you want to view the world though, that's your choice, and if that's how you choose to view the world, then you have to figure out what you need to do, both in your day to day living as well as in an overall arch, to chip away at the walls that surround you and others.

user-inactivated  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

Yeah, you're not wrong. I'm going to a professional after this interview thing. For real this time.

applewood  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Fossil-Fuel Subsidies Must End

    I hate that researchers have to spend their time on this shit.

Why? Not only is it literally their job, to put numbers to what we may or may not know, and in the process generate what might be surprising answers and interesting new questions. More importantly though, so often there are things we take for granted as "common sense" that turn out to be wrong or at the very least, better data informs better policy decisions.

goobster  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Their time should be spent on quantifying the magnitude of different efforts or plans; not on establishing the basic logic that subsidies give the recipients an anti-competitive bias over non-subsidized businesses.

There are some things that are self-evident, and researchers time should be valued more highly.

applewood  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Fossil-Fuel Subsidies Must End

I understand that. I'm just adding that there's secondary benefits to curbing this type of behavior and it's not just isolated to carbon emissions. There's all sorts of problems in the whole chain, from the extraction, processing, transportation, to eventual use of fossil fuels. It's important that we keep this stuff in the ground, but it's also important to remember why.

applewood  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: February 26, 2020

One of the things that I find most interesting about the Yellow Billed Cuckoo is that it's colloquial name is "The Storm Crow." It got the name because it's bird song is often heard on summer days before it rains. I remember the first time I came across the term, it was the name of one of the mechs in the MechWarrior game series. For years I imagined a literal crow flying around in tempests and tornados and thunderstorms and if you do an image search for "Storm Crow" you're gonna see a lot of fantasy drawings depicting just that. So imagine my surprise, some twenty plus years later, learning that this little guy is the actual bearer of the name. I never would have thought. Tangently related, a while back I was blathering about taxonomy and one of the things I talked about is how it's often a central issue in conservation. Turns out, in the western states, the population for the yellow billed cuckoo has declined precipitously and there's an attempt to designate a potential sub species for the western populations to give them protective status. Speaking of declining populations, I worry about the Rusty Black Bird because they're just darling to look at, so bright and colorful despite being what a lot of people would consider drab.

I'm about to get up off the couch to sew together some text blocks for bookbinding. I have two new types of paper that I both love and am frustrated by in equal measure. I also have probably a dozen or so text blocks that still need casing in, but, you know, it's always good to have extras. Right? I have some ideas for books, think I might share them next time kingmudsy makes a craft thread, just to get feedback.

Here's hoping you're all doing great. Spring is right around the corner.

Devac  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Spring is right around the corner.

It's so weird to hear it after a winter with maybe two days of snow and temperature scarcely breaking -3 °C. And even I can recall winters when you'd be shoveling snow and by the time you'd finish there'd already be a fresh layer where you started. Makes you think what climate change deniers smoke.

johan  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

According to SMHI spring arrived here two weeks ago and we never had a winter.

kingmudsy  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    ...think I might share them next time kingmudsy makes a craft thread...

Coming soon, to a global near you!

applewood  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Fossil-Fuel Subsidies Must End

Not talked about in the article, but related, a draw down in carbon creation, whether we're talking about drilling for or transporting oil, manufacturing, etc., reduces the risk of environmental harm. The less oil being pumped and moved, the less spills there will be. The less factories in operation, the less people develop asthma. The less planes flying, the less noise pollution interrupting the dynamic and vital sounds of nature. There's more at stake than just carbon reduction.

ButterflyEffect  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Until companies have to pay for the impact they have on this world, externalities included, its all just a pipe dream. It MUST hurt the P&L for there to be action.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

The basic argument of the article is that the lower the price for oil, the less lucrative it is to drill and therefore, the more of it stays in the ground.

Fracking really took off when crude went to $90/bbl.

applewood  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I understand that. I'm just adding that there's secondary benefits to curbing this type of behavior and it's not just isolated to carbon emissions. There's all sorts of problems in the whole chain, from the extraction, processing, transportation, to eventual use of fossil fuels. It's important that we keep this stuff in the ground, but it's also important to remember why.

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: You’re Likely to Get the Coronavirus

I'm aware. I'm just trying to give the guy the benefit of a doubt a bit.

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: You’re Likely to Get the Coronavirus

True, but it is being a bit nebulous and our imaginations tend to get the best of us when we consider the nebulous through an emotional lens. I mean, the fact that this isn't the first time I've heard similar questions during this news cycle says something. I think on the part of the media, it speaks to a lack of properly communicating perspectives and scope. On the part of us, as media consumers, I think it reflects an inability to keep our butts from getting antsy. Three of the most active articles on Hubski in as many days are on the subject, and I don't think it's because Hubski users are alarmist, but because Hubski users are thirsty for real information and it's frustratingly hard to find.

Just my perspective, is all. Too be fair, I've been pretty annoyed of how the media has been dialing things up and keeping an eye out for the next big thing these past few years. So, I know my perspective has a biased tint.

kleinbl00  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

part of dealing with the very problems you discuss is NOT giving runaway "28 days later" scenarios a bye as if they're forgivable

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm aware. I'm just trying to give the guy the benefit of a doubt a bit.

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: You’re Likely to Get the Coronavirus

    Well now you're just being alarmist. It isn't the plague, it's like a bad case of flu.

To be fair, the media is being a bit alarmist in that very few of the articles that talk about the rate of the spread also talk about severity of symptoms and how much the every day person should be concerned. The media really likes alarmism. It attracts eyeballs.

kleinbl00  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

The media is not at this will wipe out enough people to reverse the housing crisis

uhsguy  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It doesn’t take much to reverse a speculative trend. If all of a sudden people feel poorer, less secure and more interested in living in the burbs that might be enough to trigger a correction. On the other side are already record low interest rates that are driving prices the other way and possibly any future government incentives.

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

True, but it is being a bit nebulous and our imaginations tend to get the best of us when we consider the nebulous through an emotional lens. I mean, the fact that this isn't the first time I've heard similar questions during this news cycle says something. I think on the part of the media, it speaks to a lack of properly communicating perspectives and scope. On the part of us, as media consumers, I think it reflects an inability to keep our butts from getting antsy. Three of the most active articles on Hubski in as many days are on the subject, and I don't think it's because Hubski users are alarmist, but because Hubski users are thirsty for real information and it's frustratingly hard to find.

Just my perspective, is all. Too be fair, I've been pretty annoyed of how the media has been dialing things up and keeping an eye out for the next big thing these past few years. So, I know my perspective has a biased tint.

kleinbl00  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

part of dealing with the very problems you discuss is NOT giving runaway "28 days later" scenarios a bye as if they're forgivable

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm aware. I'm just trying to give the guy the benefit of a doubt a bit.

applewood  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: You’re Likely to Get the Coronavirus

Marketwatch wrote an article about a month back. That's data for recent history. You could also look at what happened in 1918 with the great Flu Epidemic. But the world, and the markets, were very different back then, so while it's interesting, it's probably not a good model to look at for today's market.