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WanderingEng's comments
WanderingEng  ·  14 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 17, 2018

Yes! I enjoy lots of things I'm not good at!

There's something about your style I really like. I think it's the comic influence.

WanderingEng  ·  15 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 17, 2018

While I have no background that qualifies me to judge art, I love your drawings. I hope you keep doing them and sharing them.

rd95  ·  14 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Thank you! That actually means a lot to me. I don't think I'd ever win any competitions, but I think I've finally learned being "good" at drawing and enjoying drawing are two different things. Knowing people enjoy them a bit makes it that more worthwhile.

WanderingEng  ·  14 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Yes! I enjoy lots of things I'm not good at!

There's something about your style I really like. I think it's the comic influence.

WanderingEng  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Early Winter Outdoors Report

Headlamp: my current go-to is the Black Diamond Sprinter. I wanted to get a rechargeable one because I told myself I'd never have dead batteries, so I always left with brand new batteries. Buying new ones before every trip when the old ones were probably good seemed wasteful.

I used this for my hike up Basin in December. Total time on was probably four or five hours with maybe an hour and a half in the morning and three hours in the evening. I don't know what the temperature actually was, but it was single digits at best and maybe negative single digits at elevation. I never took it off between morning and evening (but turned it off). That was over thirteen hours outside in the cold, and it still worked like a charm when I turned it back on.

Recommendations are a funny thing; a lot of gear stuff can be very personal. But I'm happy with my running headlamp when hiking. I also use it running.

40 mph in the open is no joke! I've had wind that bad only once, on Haystack. It felt actively dangerous despite the terrain not being steep or tricky.

I really look forward to seeing the other things you do! This all looks fantastic. It's definitely a learning experience, and I bet even the super experienced people learn things each time. Even the same trail is different on different days.

ButterflyEffect  ·  21 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Funny, we have the same headlamp. It's an amazing one, especially for running, but I would prefer a headlamp with greater on time at max lumens than the sprinter (which I thought was four hours but sounds like maybe that isn't the case), and with more of a flood than spot focus.

That sounds like a mighty cold hike at Basin. Even on Mount St. Helen's we didn't experience below zero temperatures.

WanderingEng  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Early Winter Outdoors Report

Six miles, six hours and 6000' is fantastic! What were your thoughts on the descent? In some ways, that can be even more difficult. Snowshoes up and crampons down? What kind of crampons were you using?

I have a draft winter gear post I'll try to finish. What was the weather like? Wind is what I most worry about.

My philosophy on headlamps has evolved to taking one more than I expect to need. Hike planned for daylight? I take one. Fully expect to be out in the dark? I take two. Nighttime in the woods is dark.

That picture is fantastic. I've got to get out again this winter.

ButterflyEffect  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

I'm finding descents to be dependent on proper gear, the ability to use your gear, and mental preparation. For me the latter is of considerable importance because of inexperience on steeper terrain, and traversing certain aspects of the terrain. It isn't as physically demanding but I find it more demanding in every other way. Good thing getting back down isn't optional!

Nope, we brought snowshoes but really didn't need them. We were able to boot our entire way up without much discomfort, minus some particularly strong wind gusts. The wind at the crater rim where the picture was taken was a constant probably 40 mph, which was a new experience for me. One lesson learned was to put on crampons either before or after the summit, but not at it. The wind is too strong and hands are too cold to make that work well. The weather, outside of the wind, was amazing. No precipitation, mostly sunny, though it did rain just about everywhere else!

Yeah, I'm actually going to buy another headlamp for a couple of reasons, mine doesn't have a great battery life, and it'll make it easier if people need to borrow gear.

WanderingEng  ·  1 day ago  ·  link  ·  

Headlamp: my current go-to is the Black Diamond Sprinter. I wanted to get a rechargeable one because I told myself I'd never have dead batteries, so I always left with brand new batteries. Buying new ones before every trip when the old ones were probably good seemed wasteful.

I used this for my hike up Basin in December. Total time on was probably four or five hours with maybe an hour and a half in the morning and three hours in the evening. I don't know what the temperature actually was, but it was single digits at best and maybe negative single digits at elevation. I never took it off between morning and evening (but turned it off). That was over thirteen hours outside in the cold, and it still worked like a charm when I turned it back on.

Recommendations are a funny thing; a lot of gear stuff can be very personal. But I'm happy with my running headlamp when hiking. I also use it running.

40 mph in the open is no joke! I've had wind that bad only once, on Haystack. It felt actively dangerous despite the terrain not being steep or tricky.

I really look forward to seeing the other things you do! This all looks fantastic. It's definitely a learning experience, and I bet even the super experienced people learn things each time. Even the same trail is different on different days.

ButterflyEffect  ·  21 hours ago  ·  link  ·  

Funny, we have the same headlamp. It's an amazing one, especially for running, but I would prefer a headlamp with greater on time at max lumens than the sprinter (which I thought was four hours but sounds like maybe that isn't the case), and with more of a flood than spot focus.

That sounds like a mighty cold hike at Basin. Even on Mount St. Helen's we didn't experience below zero temperatures.

WanderingEng  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Everyone is getting hilariously rich and you're not

    Current utility of cryptocurrency is a tricky one and if you judge bitcoin by what you can do with it, it's nonsense.

That's mostly true for privately held gold, too. Gold has some utility, and it's possible some privately held gold eventually makes its way into industrial processes or jewelry, but mostly it's just exchanged between individuals who agree the market price (defined by fiat) is the fair price and exchange the item and fiat.

That's a side of crypto I haven't been able to process. It seems the only thing that matters is its value in fiat. Is that a bad thing? I don't think it is. If the dollar were to be weaker compared to the euro, it has little effect on the bitcoin value as it's priced in all currencies (or at least all major currencies).

To me, that's the utility of crypto (which Swype wanted to make froyo). It's a currency that's balanced with all currencies. But how does one value such a thing? Gold can be valued by the cost of mining it. There doesn't seem to be a similar function with crypto.

kleinbl00  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    It seems the only thing that matters is its value in fiat.

I think if that were the case the Chinese wouldn't be so big into it. Realistically speaking, crypto is a numbered Swiss bank account whose interest rates are radically unpredictable.

    Presume the sole purpose of Bitcoin is to transact off the record. It is solely a marker for black market transactions. If 10% of all black market transactions were to transact in BTC, and all 21 million BTC were used to do that transacting, then 1 BTC has a nominal value of $28,000. If 100% of all black market transactions, 1 BTC has a nominal value of $285,000. At a circulating supply of 17 million BTC, worth $15,000 each, bitcoin only has the capacity to cover 2% of the black market.

I don't think this is an answer. I think this demonstrates that we don't know enough to begin to ask the question.

The military parades I've seen in the US are all related to memorials. There are as many elderly men riding in old convertible Cadillacs as there are active troops. Weapons are mostly limited to ceremonial rifles.

Where we love our shows of power is flying military jets over sporting events. They'll even do it when the event is indoors for the benefit of those at home. It's presumably yet more social engineering, that the military is a team we should all blindly cheer for in every circumstance.

b_b  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

And of course there's the added absurdity that the military pays the NFL for the right to have the NFL "support the troops." Only in America, folks.

keifermiller  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Where we love our shows of power is flying military jets over sporting events.

My city's got a fuckin' polaris missle in a city park.

I was in the Army National Guard from 1998 to 2004. I think I've mentioned it before on hubski that I loathed those "support the troops" magnets people put on their cars. As one of the people they were ostensibly supporting, it seemed clear it was nothing about me and primarily about supporting George Bush and his war.

I know invoking Michael Moore garners strong reactions from some on all sides of the political spectrum, but there's a line from Fahrenheit 9/11 that stuck with me. It's discussing the volunteer military and that the expectation should be that they're sent into danger only when absolutely necessary. That's what "support the troops" failed to do. Supporting the troops would have meant questioning the civilian leaders. It would have meant pressure to avoid conflict. Instead all they (important note: I never deployed) got was letters from third grade classes and care packages of junk food.

katakowsj  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I’m thankful at least, that currently, my kids and their friends play minimally with war toys right now. Some Star Wars stuff and nerf dart guns are as warlike as they get.

Heck, my brother and I had quite a GI Joe arsenal of troops, tanks, and planes growing up, in addition to cap guns, Star Wars battle toys and spent a sizeable amount of time playing battle, watching related shows and movies, and reviewing tv commercials of the next purchases we needed to build up our armies of deterrence.

b_b  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I was driving by the remnants of Summit Place mall just the other day, and it reminded me of a birthday I had when I was probably 7 or 8. My aunt took me there to buy whatever I wanted from Toys-R-Us, and naturally I picked out a relatively realistic looking bolt action rifle (since my mom never would have allowed that sort of thing). I loved that gun, because it was the most real-looking gun of all kids I'd play shooting games with. But that was it. It was a toy, and a fun toy, but it ended at pretend. I know your brother pretty well, and it doesn't seem to me that any of those GI Joes gave him any predilection toward violence, either.

That trip down memory lane was pretty important, however, because I was driving with my wife, and full disclosure, she's set to give birth to our son within a few days. I revere my childhood experience of playing guns, and I sincerely believe that it helped to make me more curious about the world. I don't for a second think that toys like that are harmful, and yet I seem to be at odds with society on this one. I'm not criticizing, but genuinely curious as to why parents such as yourself (who played with toy soldiers as a child) think that it's a good thing that your kids don't? Is there any reason to think that playing war leads to violence, and that you and I (and all my cousins and childhood friends I played with who also grew up well adjusted) are exceptions?

My instinct is that we've gone way overboard in regulating toy guns. I literally have no data on this, and I don't know the experience of raising kids yet. My only evidence here is growing up. Very interested for your thoughts on this (and of course any other parents out there, especially those of sons).

johnnyFive  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

My two cents, for both you and katakowsj.

I played with guns a ton, played every violent video game available in the late '80s and early '90s, wrestled with my friends, you name it. And I'm about as anti-war and non-violent as you can get.

There's so much more to it than the toys we play with: it was the context. The scarier thing for me, looking back, was the degree of nationalism that went with the Cold War. I was lucky in that I was too young to get the full brunt of that, but then was old enough by the time 9/11 happened (18) that I had enough foundation not to be suckered in.

Humans are humans, and we're still around because our ancestors were willing to kill someone else to survive. That hasn't left us, so we can pretend that those thoughts aren't there or allow them some healthy expression. Moreover, self-defense is a right and isn't something that should be stigmatized.

b_b  ·  3 days ago  ·  link  ·  

You have kids, right? How do you feel about the idea of them playing violent games?

johnnyFive  ·  2 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Just the one so far, but yeah. I'm fine with her playing violent stuff within reason, with the degree based on her age. In other words, she needs some experience with life in general before anything too gory or violent would be appropriate IMO. But she knows I do kung fu and is starting to understand what that means. She understands the idea of protecting her from monsters. We play Mario Kart together, and she thinks it's funny when people get hit with turtle shells. This is about where she's at right now.

What I keep in mind is the simple fact that violence is still a part of our lives in some form or another. Just as I don't want her to be so unused to personal freedom that she goes on a 6-month binge when she goes to college, I don't want her to have so little experience with the idea of violence that she can't handle it when it comes unbidden. My job as a parent is in part to train her to face the rest of the world, and that includes exposure to violence. Familiarity breeds contempt, and I want her to be able to cope even as I want her not to revel in it.

WanderingEng  ·  5 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

Thanks, I didn't know the seat sensor was capacitive. I've been driving it for 15 months and the sensor never went off with books, groceries, hat/gloves, water bottles, but then I put my boot traction spikes on it and the alarm is killing me.

I agree the infotainment is awful, but I've driven worse ones as rentals. The Chevy Trax had a touchscreen volume control which was awful. I Bluetooth audio into mine, too, and it drives me crazy that the system doesn't use the phone album or artist art. Other systems do. The system functions fine on a basic level, but it feels like something I'd have expected in 2010, not my 2016 model year.

I've been nothing but happy with the AWD. I've driven it into some pretty snowy hiking trailheads. While I might have done the same with my Civic, it would have been a ton of planning both for the approach into the lot and getting out. With the Impreza, I just drove in and back out. I'm not talking two feet of snow, but 6-9" can be a real concern. No problem in the Impreza.

WanderingEng  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

It apparently qualifies for the $7500 federal tax credit. I haven't figured out when the credit applies. Best I can tell, it's when filling one's taxes, meaning I wouldn't see that cash until next year in April. That also means either shelling it out now or financing it. I might have to ask someone more knowledgeable to verify.

steve  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I think you’re spot on. One of the reasons I leased a leaf when I did is because when you do, Nissan recognizes the rebate immediately, and the price reflects that. At the time, the lease rate was effectively zero, and the post-lease sale price was higher than it should have been - so the delta between the price and the buyout was so small that the payments were ridiculously low. The best part was - they assumed the resale would be MUCH higher than it was, so they took a bath on the thing. I could have bought it for almost nothing at the end of the lease... but that’s another story for another day.

Your mileage may vary - pun intended - but yah... all tax breaks come in April of the following year... and you better hope you’ve got a tax bill of more than $7500 or you may see nothing of it.

Sorry, this comment is private.
WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

Training is a good one! I follow an Adirondack hiker forum, and the conventional wisdom there is that running isn't hiking. But some of my strongest hikes were during my marathon training or a month after the race. Maybe road running on comparatively flat areas isn't ideal for mountain hiking training, but it seemed pretty effective.

I'm considering signing up for another marathon in part to motivate myself to be in good shape for hiking.

WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

14 miles in snowshoes the first time out is great, especially with the elevation gain! So is turning back when necessary! Any hike that ends with all hikers safe and uninjured is a successful hike.

Any interest in a post to geek about gear? I know I'd enjoy discussing stuff.

ButterflyEffect  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Only four of the fourteen were with the snowshoes on! But it was great any way you dice it. A gear geek thread would be awesome! Gear, clothing, and training!

WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Training is a good one! I follow an Adirondack hiker forum, and the conventional wisdom there is that running isn't hiking. But some of my strongest hikes were during my marathon training or a month after the race. Maybe road running on comparatively flat areas isn't ideal for mountain hiking training, but it seemed pretty effective.

I'm considering signing up for another marathon in part to motivate myself to be in good shape for hiking.

WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

I paid off my mortgage and told no one. I recommend it.

goobster  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I told a couple of people, and then quickly realized this was a bad idea.

I don't mention it any more. Except... well... now.

francopoli  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I don't tell anyone my finances. You guys on Hubski know more about my situation than anyone I know in real life.

WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

Oops I meant Clarity, Honda's new plug-in hybrid.

steve  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·  

OOOooOOOOooooo.... I like the sound of those words... I will research!

Thanks!

WanderingEng  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It apparently qualifies for the $7500 federal tax credit. I haven't figured out when the credit applies. Best I can tell, it's when filling one's taxes, meaning I wouldn't see that cash until next year in April. That also means either shelling it out now or financing it. I might have to ask someone more knowledgeable to verify.

steve  ·  6 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I think you’re spot on. One of the reasons I leased a leaf when I did is because when you do, Nissan recognizes the rebate immediately, and the price reflects that. At the time, the lease rate was effectively zero, and the post-lease sale price was higher than it should have been - so the delta between the price and the buyout was so small that the payments were ridiculously low. The best part was - they assumed the resale would be MUCH higher than it was, so they took a bath on the thing. I could have bought it for almost nothing at the end of the lease... but that’s another story for another day.

Your mileage may vary - pun intended - but yah... all tax breaks come in April of the following year... and you better hope you’ve got a tax bill of more than $7500 or you may see nothing of it.

WanderingEng  ·  7 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 10, 2018

I'd say I trust my car to not do something stupid. If it was a person, it wouldn't spend the grocery money on lottery tickets. But if it was a person it would put the toilet paper on backwards and burn dinner because they were watching TV and lots of other little things that would bug me.

I liked my last car, but when it was time to change, I shrugged and moved on, sort of like you said. This one, then, isn't a bad car, but it isn't a great partner.