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Devac's comments
Devac  ·  5 hours ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: May 24, 2017

Lots of reading for uni, that's pretty much it on that front. I did manage to pass my driver's licence test, so that's cool.

In other news, a bit of a PSA: if your regular cardiologist, or any other doctor for that matter, isn't available and someone else needs to take you in, then don't let him prescribe you anything that isn't a refill on your current prescription! Learned that one the hard way.

I was given a beta blocker that I don't need. And if that wasn't stupid enough, I was prescribed Sotalol of all things. It's not only designed to treat severe arrhythmias (I have a mild one that's not immediately life-threatening) but like most drugs from the 1970s it comes with a bucketload of shitty side effects.

I had to stop taking it after four days because while I can manage being constantly nauseous, dizzy and with a headache it made me gasp for air. By day three I was not only unable to properly exercise, I was losing breath while walking upstairs. That's an achievement: take a guy who runs ~4km each day and turn him into someone with worse cardio than my eighty-four-year-old grandfather.

Starting to lose faith in doctors here. The fact that a lobotomy recipient like my replacement doc could become someone whom I will never be, serves to only piss me off that much more. Fact that I was stupid enough to take what he prescribed is only adding insult to injury. I'm mostly fine, although I'm willing to hazard a guess that the main reasons behind it are stopping taking Sotalol and a healthy dose of this sweet BP-rising anger.

Devac  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Teaching stuff is resolved.

Thank you. :D

    I hope you told those two principals what you think happened at your old school. You don't want that to come back and bite you.

I provided them with as complete image of the situation as I could. Reason and it being only a theory notwithstanding.

    You will probably disagree with my following comments. I'm interested in knowing what you think:

I actually don't think so. I have my own experiences and biases, granted, but despite quite a few differences I'm largely of similar mind.

    Not all. Some, maybe even many, deal with things with integrity.

One generalisation, unintentional I might add, and it's here. ;)

    Principals are terrified of parents. Keep in mind that you still have not talked directly to the principal and don't really know what happened. You still have the option of behaving with integrity and trying to clarify any misunderstanding.

This is something that I didn't really see while I was a student there. Mistake or selective memories could be a thing, but there were cases where student's parents would come with complaints and principal's response was pretty much "You know, no one forces your kid to be in this school". There were something close to eighteen candidates per place after selecting the best to take the internal exam when I was being admitted, so it was a pretty strong leverage. I'm willing to agree here purely because I'm new to this mess.

    is still just a theory.

Yes, but since the principal didn't give me any response I have to do with what I got from secondary sources. Not the best situation, but that's what I have.

    Model appropriate behaviour by facing the problem calmly and asking for clarification and mentoring.

I try, but I was more often than not ignored by people. It's going to be hard to move past it.

    It's in your best interest to get this false or misguided or bullshit accusation cleared up with the principal and by all your actions, you've demonstrated that you are a serious teacher.

Again, "yes, but…". Unless the principal will graciously start responding I can only do it by doing my best and hope that she'll take some of your advice herself and consider that perhaps there was even a slight tinge of her being guilty of this situation.

    Rather than writing them off as being full of shit, give them a chance to work it out with you.

I figured that I could be slightly less restrained and diplomatic around the people here. ;)

I appreciate your advice and will follow it as far as I can. That said, I don't know why you thought that I would disagree with you outright. Good advice is good advice.

lil  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Thanx

I thought you might disagree because it would be awkward to go to someone in a superior position who treated you badly and say, "I've been thinking about what you said, and ..."

I also thought that since whatever you said was soooo much a non-issue, apologizing would seem ridiculous. Anyway, I'm glad it all ended well.

Devac  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Teaching stuff is resolved.

    You're making my head hurt.

Sorry. This is getting saved to motivate me to develop some sort "you are too sleepy to write" test.

    That might be what got you in trouble - you flippantly picked a religious concept you don't understand perfectly and then used it incorrectly to make your point.

Can't argue with that, although I wouldn't say I was flippant intentionally. Regardless, I get your point.

    But in the Conway glider example, what is the invariant?

Really useful frame-by-frame visualisation

Invariants:

1. Number of black squares after each step.

2. Direction of movement.

3. Distance it will move between each complete cycle.

4. There will always be only one black square that is connected to the rest of the structure by its vertex.

Some of them are invariants for a whole cycle, others work for each frame.

    This is why I gave a counter-example of catalysts - you need them for the reaction, but their mass returns to solution in the course of the process.

Yes. The catalyst can be thought of as an invariant of a specific chemical reaction. Again, sorry for my more than underwhelming response earlier. I hope that this one is clearer.

Devac  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Teaching stuff is resolved.

EDIT: More or less you can (and should) ignore this post. I'll leave it as it is for the sake of the rest of the conversation below, but I was seriously jamming words together at places.

    So an invariant is not a constant because an invariant is subject to conditions while a constant is defined?

I'm going to answer "yes, but". Invariants can be constants, but not all constants are invariants. It depends on in respect to what something is invariant.

Let's make the karma example more explicit. We already have a set of 4 people. 3 of them have good karma, 1 has a bad karma. This might be an invariant depending on the rules for karma exchange we will make.

Now here are the rules for karma exchange (in pairs, interact with everyone around you):

1. A person with good karma will give good karma to a person with good karma. (Harmony)

2. A person with good karma will have to do something bad to a person with bad karma. (They get what they deserve)

3. A person with bad karma will have to do something good to a person with good karma. (They repent for what they have done)

4. A person with bad karma will do something bad to a person with bad karma. (War never changes)

Now, let's go turn by turn:

Turn 0:

  G G

G B

Turn 1:

  G <1> G

^ ^

2 4

v v

G <3> B

1. Good with Good, nothing changes.

2. Good with Good, nothing changes.

3. Good does something bad to Bad.

4. Good with Good, nothing changes.

So the state goes:

  G G     G G   G G    G G    G G 

G B G B G B B G B G

Turn 2 (same order of operation):

  G G    G G    B G     B G    B G

B G B G G G G G G G

(sorry if I made some sort of mistake along the way, I am seriously tired after last few days)

The invariant can be anything that does not changes as a holistic property when discussing examples like the one above. There will always be one Bad karma, it just passes to the next person in this case. But as a more general term, it's anything that will come as a result of a certain type of operation. Adding any number to it's opposite:

  1 + (-1), 2 + (-2) … n + (-n)
will be always equal to zero (for a given definition of addition ;)). While trivial, it is indeed an invariant of the operation as it will work for any object. You always have to specify in respect to what you have your invariant property.

Am I making any sense? Sorry, I'm seriously not at my best but I wanted to respond today. If that's not clear please tell me.

kleinbl00  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

You're making my head hurt. Also, perhaps part of the problem is that's not how Karma works.

Here are the actual rules for Karma exchange:

1. A person with good karma will increase their good karma by helping a person with good karma.

2. A person with good karma will increase their good karma by helping a person with bad karma.

3. A person with bad karma will increase their good karma by helping a person with good karma.

4. A person with bad karma will increase their good karma by helping a person with bad karma.

The steady-state of Karma is enlightenment - we all break free of the wheel and vanish into the universe in a cloud of patchouli-scented bliss. It may not be a good example for invariance. That might be what got you in trouble - you flippantly picked a religious concept you don't understand perfectly and then used it incorrectly to make your point.

Which - even accepting your terms, even accepting your math - I still don't understand and I have an engineering degree:

    While trivial, it is indeed an invariant of the operation as it will work for any object.

WHAT is indeed an invariant of the operation? What are we defining here? An integer plus its negative integer will equal zero - so is that an invariant operation? But that's "invariant" as adjective, not "an invariant" as noun.

I get the condition of invariance - the Conway glider is a great example. But in the Conway glider example, what is the invariant? This is why I gave a counter-example of catalysts - you need them for the reaction, but their mass returns to solution in the course of the process.

bfv  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    WHAT is indeed an invariant of the operation? What are we defining here? An integer plus its negative integer will equal zero - so is that an invariant operation? But that's "invariant" as adjective, not "an invariant" as noun.

The invariant is a property. If you're a mathematician, a property is a thing you can define an indicator function for.

kleinbl00  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

So "properties" are like "metadata" of the equation. They're not in it but they're a 2nd order quality that can be analyzed or used in other equations. They're not like catalysts, because the catalyst is actually in the equation - they're more like molarity.

bfv  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

So invariants are generalized from geometry. Angles being invariant under isometries is probably the ur-example. If you have a triangle, the measure of the angle A is a property of the triangle. If you translate the triangle, the image of A has the same measure as A. Another definition of a property is a one-argument predicate; it's something you can say about an object. If you know an invariant holds before an operation, you know it holds after; that's what's interesting about them.

Something is only a catalyst in a particular reaction, so I would think it would only make sense to say "C is a catalysts" is a property of the reaction as a whole. My chemistry is beyond rusty though.

Devac  ·  14 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    You're making my head hurt.

Sorry. This is getting saved to motivate me to develop some sort "you are too sleepy to write" test.

    That might be what got you in trouble - you flippantly picked a religious concept you don't understand perfectly and then used it incorrectly to make your point.

Can't argue with that, although I wouldn't say I was flippant intentionally. Regardless, I get your point.

    But in the Conway glider example, what is the invariant?

Really useful frame-by-frame visualisation

Invariants:

1. Number of black squares after each step.

2. Direction of movement.

3. Distance it will move between each complete cycle.

4. There will always be only one black square that is connected to the rest of the structure by its vertex.

Some of them are invariants for a whole cycle, others work for each frame.

    This is why I gave a counter-example of catalysts - you need them for the reaction, but their mass returns to solution in the course of the process.

Yes. The catalyst can be thought of as an invariant of a specific chemical reaction. Again, sorry for my more than underwhelming response earlier. I hope that this one is clearer.

Devac  ·  16 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up

I think that the revived pathogen would be largely similar, but since it would be allowed to evolve with different initial conditions it could find a divergent path for its evolution making it a similar but 'different enough' strain that would react differently. This assumes that it could prove to be as virulent as it was in the past. Also, kleinbl00 made a great point: we have evolved alongside these pathogens and they couldn't spread efficiently enough to prevail to our times in that form.

That said, it's nothing but hard speculation on my part.

Devac  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm not welcome as a teacher, don't know why.

    You're in as much of a rush to get out of school as me, it sounds like.

Nah, I like it so far. However, if I could get to the finish faster, then why not make an attempt at it? In my case it works like this: some of the courses that I am eligible to take count both toward my undergrad and to the specialisation I want to take because courses with the exact same codes and material are listed on both of them. On top of it, a lot of the physics courses that qualify for theoretical physics count as valid options for applied maths majors. Other courses, like the Classical Field Theory that I'm doing now, count for both masters programmes and my selection of 'interests topics' during undergrad.

I'm actually minimising my work for maximal ETCS gain by playing around with how the courses are transferred between departments. :P

Plus I'm not going to lie, it would be a cool thing to finally best my brother at something. ;)

    Try to have at least a bit of fun on the way

I do have fun. Maybe not in the 'going to parties' way, but I rarely like how it works for me. Actually, I just came back from one and despite having some good time I grew more and more bored as it progressed. Now I sit in front my laptop with a freshly launched IDE and have a blast working on one of my projects. Perhaps it would be easier for me if I could not taste or smell alcohol, though. ;P

    I have a laundry list of relatively harmless things I'll eventually be following through on. Like spoofing official procedural paperwork placed next to the microwave in the break room, with a new sign enforcing paper documentation of microwave usage, and caution tape stuck to the floor in a perimeter around it all.

Dang! I hope that you'll share it afterwards. Definitely sounds like something I can get behind. Most of the ones here are based on various stickers so it would be a good way to stray from the formula. I'll have to start taking pictures of some of them, one was a really bitchin' parody of the Superman logo where it was changed to δS followed by (not translated literally) "You know the hero by the way he acts". :D

Devac  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm not welcome as a teacher, don't know why.

I appreciate the advice. Really, I do and thank you for it. But that whole "push yourself to try again straight after a failure" never really worked for me. Believe me, it was tried time and time again when I tried to learn (or improve) how to swim, ride a bike, care for plants or deliver lines. It was at best just kinda frustrating, at worst it was causing me to burn out this much faster.

nowaypablo  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Well I'm not trying to give you a motivational speech here, but any sort of public speaking or performance in front of a crowd is pretty complicated and a difficult thing to master. I'm just saying that you clearly love speaking about these subjects that you love to study, and if one failure-- one which you still have not gotten a clear explanation for-- is going to make you take a break, then it seems like you're betraying your commitments to these things.

I played piano for 12 years and ended up playing at some really big stages more than once. After a shitty, shitty performance I wanted nothing more than to have nothing to do with the piano for a while, but my mom made me watch the recordings which I fucking hated doing. I ended up glad that I had these recordings to be able to proactively assess my performance instead of wallowing in the failure.

Not trying to push you in any way, just pointing out that you're doing something really really cool, which makes me pretty jealous as someone who loves physics but is mediocre at it, and you may be taking a setback a little too harshly here.

Devac  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm not welcome as a teacher, don't know why.

    Again, I'm sorry to reinforce your existing worries, but I think age and your corresponding position as "student" allows them to feel no moral qualms about leaving you in the dark.

Eh, don't worry. I'm accustomed to it by now, at least more or less. Here's an excerpt from a talk with ThatFanficGuy on the same subject:

23:07 < ThatFanficGuy> Sounds odd that they'd push you away like that.

23:07 < ThatFanficGuy> You tell the story of a good teacher: never late, students enjoying your work...

23:08 < Devac> eh, I had worse. I also never commited any crime worse than jaywalking and yet every policeman I interacted with thinks that I'm either sassing him/her or look/do/seem suspicious

It's just one of those things at this point. Only, as you clearly know, can get to me easier than other problems.

    The folks who treated you right are worth keeping around, and you'll remember which ones they are veryyyyy naturally.

Absolutely. I mean, don't all sane people have their own nice and naughty lists?

    if I watched you lecture, I'd probably just end up feeling even more stupid than I do currently

Nice words coming from someone who accused me of having an impostor syndrome. Twice iirc. :P

    Man, I wish I could be there to see what happens to them when they try to break you, in graduate school.

This might happen earlier than I was thinking. I crunched some numbers and if I play the next semester juuust right I might reduce my maths masters programme to one year (normally it's 3 years of undergrad and 2 years to get to masters). It's as if no-one involved in making our regulations had to ever min-max a fighter for a D&D game. Seriously, there are at least three loopholes about the course selection that apply to me.

    in this instance, you don't need to go through them to lecture. Just set up sessions without directly involving the school, if people are interested. You should teach, it's the best way to learn.

Now that you mention it, university students can requisition any lecture room that isn't scheduled for any further use on a given day. Yess… I will gather the various geeks and nerds und other misfits into a single location and slowly mould them into problem-solving machines that are loyal only to ME!

My former high school will rue this day most dearly!

am_Unition  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I crunched some numbers and if I play the next semester juuust right I might reduce my maths masters programme to one year

See? Part of the program is figuring that out. You're in as much of a rush to get out of school as me, it sounds like. Try to have at least a bit of fun on the way, though, you've earned it.

I have a laundry list of relatively harmless things I'll eventually be following through on. Like spoofing official procedural paperwork placed next to the microwave in the break room, with a new sign enforcing paper documentation of microwave usage, and caution tape stuck to the floor in a perimeter around it all. The document's intro will include a very long section about optimal methods of microwaving various types of food based on water content, geometry and composition of container, mass, initial temperature, power dissipation of microwave, etc., and that'll be no joke. I've conducted... many microwave heating characterizations. But the safety portion of the document is going to see me have a field day with radiation misconceptions.

Keep your creative outlets, they will help you do science better than any formalized instruction ever can. It's great that you still have them, I've seen some art from you on here. My artistic outlets are limited and very lewd, right now.

Devac  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    You're in as much of a rush to get out of school as me, it sounds like.

Nah, I like it so far. However, if I could get to the finish faster, then why not make an attempt at it? In my case it works like this: some of the courses that I am eligible to take count both toward my undergrad and to the specialisation I want to take because courses with the exact same codes and material are listed on both of them. On top of it, a lot of the physics courses that qualify for theoretical physics count as valid options for applied maths majors. Other courses, like the Classical Field Theory that I'm doing now, count for both masters programmes and my selection of 'interests topics' during undergrad.

I'm actually minimising my work for maximal ETCS gain by playing around with how the courses are transferred between departments. :P

Plus I'm not going to lie, it would be a cool thing to finally best my brother at something. ;)

    Try to have at least a bit of fun on the way

I do have fun. Maybe not in the 'going to parties' way, but I rarely like how it works for me. Actually, I just came back from one and despite having some good time I grew more and more bored as it progressed. Now I sit in front my laptop with a freshly launched IDE and have a blast working on one of my projects. Perhaps it would be easier for me if I could not taste or smell alcohol, though. ;P

    I have a laundry list of relatively harmless things I'll eventually be following through on. Like spoofing official procedural paperwork placed next to the microwave in the break room, with a new sign enforcing paper documentation of microwave usage, and caution tape stuck to the floor in a perimeter around it all.

Dang! I hope that you'll share it afterwards. Definitely sounds like something I can get behind. Most of the ones here are based on various stickers so it would be a good way to stray from the formula. I'll have to start taking pictures of some of them, one was a really bitchin' parody of the Superman logo where it was changed to δS followed by (not translated literally) "You know the hero by the way he acts". :D

Devac  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm not welcome as a teacher, don't know why.

    Did the principal attend any of the classes ever?

Nope, not in person at least. Vice principle (is there a name for it?) did attend it quite a few times, even asked a few questions when I was talking about isomorphisms. :D

    He sounds like not the warmest guy - but I'd strongly consider asking him.

I'll do that. About him as a person though, he's actually really nice. But he holds great expectations and high standards for his students. Plus he's a great teacher, nineteen out of twenty-five students in his class are medalists of at least national level Olympics.

    Also, who is the teacher in charge of the Math and Physics Club. Who did you work with scheduling your short lessons - the principal or someone else?

The teacher who's in charge of the club has to attend and it's always them who handle scheduling and actual conduct of the lesson. I send the dates when I can do it along with an abstract of what I want to talk about (usually I'll also send slides in advance), they make a final decision about 'when' and whatever administrative voodoo happens afterwards is not something that I'm privy to. I don't think that it ever needs the principal to give the green light unless the rumours are true and she is our webmaster.

    It might be a calling. Don't let the bastards grind you down.

Dunno. Maybe you are right, but I oftentimes will simply get bored with things no matter if I excel or struggle with them. For instance, I was pretty damn good when it came to dancing, loved it to be honest, and now I just don't find it fun. No grinding me down or bad event that I could relate to it. It simply stopped being something I would like to continue doing. There are quite a few things like that already.

That said, I'm far from lacking enthusiasm at the moment. Frankly, I almost want to become a good teacher out of spite. ;)

someguyfromcanada  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I would like to be a good teacher but it is not my calling.

My Mother and Father were both highly rated teachers. My brother and sister are both highly rated teachers. I have accepted the fact that I am a shitty teacher. Although my clients and friends regularly compliment me on how I can simplify things to make them understandable, patience is not my strong suit and I can choose my clients/friends but not my students. So I can get frustrated with people I see as slow to understand. That is a horrible trait for a teacher as one should inspire every student. I do not. That will never change, or more correctly I am not interested in working hard on changing that, so that is something I accept. If you do see it as a calling you have to know your weaknesses and work hard on those. Having a talk with the Principal, Vice-Principal, teacher to see what there honest constructive criticism is would be a great start.

Regardless, I do agree that many workplace "problems" are just stupid office politics and you can not work hard on changing that from the outside. Try another situation or ten and see how that goes.

ThatFanficGuy  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Sounds like you could still do a YouTube series about stuff on the matters of your interest.

romkeh  ·  9 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    For instance, I was pretty damn good when it came to dancing, loved it to be honest, and now I just don't find it fun.

Maybe you just need to find a new dance partner. Same goes for the lecturing.

Devac  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm not welcome as a teacher, don't know why.

    principal wasn't professional enough to have a straight conversation with you?

True, but keep in mind the time difference. She emailed me after hours (19:20) and May in Polish schools is always hectic due to the matura exam season. It's not like I don't think that it's kinda shitty of her to not do it in person, but it's more than likely that she genuinely had no time. But I don't want to make excuses for it so think of it as me just laying down some possible background.

    do you want to find another outlet for that?

Absolutely! And it's not like there aren't any other schools that would go for it. I just don't know if I want to do it just this second. Not gonna lie, this situation bummed me out and I'll likely give it a rest until the next semester.

nowaypablo  ·  18 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I'll likely give it a rest until the next semester.

If the true reasoning was some flaw in your performance as a lecturer, I think the absolute worst thing you could do is to give it a rest. If there are flaws you need to find a way to do it again in some form, record yourself, and find out exactly what you need to improve on.

Devac  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I appreciate the advice. Really, I do and thank you for it. But that whole "push yourself to try again straight after a failure" never really worked for me. Believe me, it was tried time and time again when I tried to learn (or improve) how to swim, ride a bike, care for plants or deliver lines. It was at best just kinda frustrating, at worst it was causing me to burn out this much faster.

nowaypablo  ·  17 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Well I'm not trying to give you a motivational speech here, but any sort of public speaking or performance in front of a crowd is pretty complicated and a difficult thing to master. I'm just saying that you clearly love speaking about these subjects that you love to study, and if one failure-- one which you still have not gotten a clear explanation for-- is going to make you take a break, then it seems like you're betraying your commitments to these things.

I played piano for 12 years and ended up playing at some really big stages more than once. After a shitty, shitty performance I wanted nothing more than to have nothing to do with the piano for a while, but my mom made me watch the recordings which I fucking hated doing. I ended up glad that I had these recordings to be able to proactively assess my performance instead of wallowing in the failure.

Not trying to push you in any way, just pointing out that you're doing something really really cool, which makes me pretty jealous as someone who loves physics but is mediocre at it, and you may be taking a setback a little too harshly here.

Devac  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Welcome to Hubski

Hi, rocketyak!

Sounds like you are going to like it here. People here don't really like or use memes (at least in such intensity, there are still some :P) and while conversation can indeed turn into a bit of a shouting match, even then you will see people citing sources and making points. If you would find some old topic as interesting, you can still respond and likely revive it. Hubski does not have the thread archival in place where after six months it freezes.

If you would have questions, please don't be shy and ask. If I will not know the answer, someone will. From the top of my head, I can recommend you #pubski (new thread every Wednesday will be created under this tag, it's a pub-like setting where people just tell about new stuff in their life) and bfv's #weeklymusicthread. Here are the Latest Pubski and Latest Share Your Music threads.

Also, if you haven't done so already, please read the Hubski Primer and maybe the FAQ as these are here for a good reason. ;)

Devac  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon

    it does not serve the interests of the subscribers for their content to only be that which is approved by the sponsors

This bit actually didn't occur to me. It indeed sounds like a murky conflict of interests. Is resolving such issues really a job of the editor? I was always thinking of them as skilled lingusts or writers who 'demangle' text and check it for factual or other types of errors.

    (libel not liable - I hope I can point that out to someone for whom English is not their first language without being a douchebag)

Doh! Thanks. No duchebag detected, I appreciate any education that isn't a clear put-down, which isn't the case.

am_Unition  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Unsolicited coding break garbage:

There was a Japanese scientist who had me build him some stuff for a rocket once, and one day, he went into the machine shop with me. American machinists are notoriously lewd and whatnot, so after he said "ohh, I like this, I really like this" about an intricate part that they had made, one of them says "well, Haruto, when we like something a lot, here in America, we say, 'that's the shit!' ". So the scientist says "Shit? What means shit?", and some of them are making the face ya do when you don't wanna "lose your shit", but the machinist comes back and says "It's just really good... stuff. Anything, really". The scientist thanks them for this lesson, and we leave.

Of course, less than a minute later, I had to tell him not to ever use that in a professional setting, and explain that it is a crude, explicit term. But to this day, the idea of being there, in the crowd, when he innocently exclaims that his data is "the shit", at a conference... hilarious, but I just can't do that to the guy.

kleinbl00  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It goes to the concept of the Fourth Estate - the argument is that the press, as the ears and voice of the people, has an obligation to defend the interests of the people against the other three estates (the clergy, the nobility and the commoners or the executive, the legislative and the judicial depending on who's counting). There's a reason the press in the United States enjoys a lot of freedom - the argument is that a free and functional press is a check on power against the government.

"Editorial" in English means both "proper construction and content" AND "position taken in an argument." The "editorial pages" in a newspaper are where the staff members write opinion pieces, often to augment the reportage of their newspaper. So. A copy editor? Makes the grammar and phrasing better. A content editor? Steers the story or novel or article. An "editorial board?" Decides what formal position the paper takes on political and news issues. So when you see an article saying something like "the libertarian whackadoo has gotten more editorial endorsements than Trump" they're not talking about proofreaders, they're talking about the upper-level people at the paper who issue proclamations, positions and recommendations in their role as member of the fourth estate.

Devac  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon

The link points to a different article.

Anyway, how is that about free speech? Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that the freedom of speech is about government not preventing you from having your voice heard. You can still be sued for liable or suffer any other consequences of what you say. In this case, it was publisher firing the artists after the sponsor felt offended. Nothing about government, nothing about preventing this cartoon from getting published. It's just a pure repercussion of the action. The sponsor, who isn't to my knowledge a governmental entity, can do whatever the fuck he wants to do with the money as per own judgement, as it is usually a deal predicated on said sponsor's good will.

This sounds like business. Perhaps bad PR. But it's not an infringement on anyone's free speech.

kleinbl00  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

(libel not liable - I hope I can point that out to someone for whom English is not their first language without being a douchebag)

Things get sticky when it comes to journalism. On the one hand, it's a for-profit, commercial venture. On the other hand, it's a for-profit, commercial venture whose civic duty is to provide critique and criticism of the actions of those in power. In the US, the classic example of cartoons and political freedom is Tammany Hall and Thomas Nast, whereby a large organization with monolithic control over much of the state apparatus around them was brought down by a cartoonist. Another example would be the lack of criticism of any Hearst-owned property by the papers of William Randolph Hearst.

The argument is this: it may offend the sponsor to be criticized, and it may be within the rights of the publisher to terminate the cartoonist... but it does not serve the interests of the subscribers for their content to only be that which is approved by the sponsors. Obviously, pretty much every journalistic organization deals with this on some level; this is, chapter and verse, the definition of editorial independence.

You're right. The sponsor can do whatever the fuck he wants to do. The editor, on the other hand, is supposed to protect his journalists. In this case, he didn't.

They did eventually.

Devac  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    it does not serve the interests of the subscribers for their content to only be that which is approved by the sponsors

This bit actually didn't occur to me. It indeed sounds like a murky conflict of interests. Is resolving such issues really a job of the editor? I was always thinking of them as skilled lingusts or writers who 'demangle' text and check it for factual or other types of errors.

    (libel not liable - I hope I can point that out to someone for whom English is not their first language without being a douchebag)

Doh! Thanks. No duchebag detected, I appreciate any education that isn't a clear put-down, which isn't the case.

am_Unition  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Unsolicited coding break garbage:

There was a Japanese scientist who had me build him some stuff for a rocket once, and one day, he went into the machine shop with me. American machinists are notoriously lewd and whatnot, so after he said "ohh, I like this, I really like this" about an intricate part that they had made, one of them says "well, Haruto, when we like something a lot, here in America, we say, 'that's the shit!' ". So the scientist says "Shit? What means shit?", and some of them are making the face ya do when you don't wanna "lose your shit", but the machinist comes back and says "It's just really good... stuff. Anything, really". The scientist thanks them for this lesson, and we leave.

Of course, less than a minute later, I had to tell him not to ever use that in a professional setting, and explain that it is a crude, explicit term. But to this day, the idea of being there, in the crowd, when he innocently exclaims that his data is "the shit", at a conference... hilarious, but I just can't do that to the guy.

kleinbl00  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It goes to the concept of the Fourth Estate - the argument is that the press, as the ears and voice of the people, has an obligation to defend the interests of the people against the other three estates (the clergy, the nobility and the commoners or the executive, the legislative and the judicial depending on who's counting). There's a reason the press in the United States enjoys a lot of freedom - the argument is that a free and functional press is a check on power against the government.

"Editorial" in English means both "proper construction and content" AND "position taken in an argument." The "editorial pages" in a newspaper are where the staff members write opinion pieces, often to augment the reportage of their newspaper. So. A copy editor? Makes the grammar and phrasing better. A content editor? Steers the story or novel or article. An "editorial board?" Decides what formal position the paper takes on political and news issues. So when you see an article saying something like "the libertarian whackadoo has gotten more editorial endorsements than Trump" they're not talking about proofreaders, they're talking about the upper-level people at the paper who issue proclamations, positions and recommendations in their role as member of the fourth estate.

bioemerl  ·  19 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Free speech is an ideal, like donating to charity. Government may not restrict your free speech by law. Everyone else shouldn't restrict your free speech because they aren't scumbags. If they do, then they are scumbags, and should be treated as such.

Devac  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Perspective API: Using machine learning to score the toxicity of online comments

    I don't know I'd describe the problem as "strictness" so much as "lack of context."

That's true, but applying strict rules with or without context (or boundary for applicability for that matter) is still a bad way to go about problem solving. Until the Perspective API will get more samples, curation of its conclusions or other improvements to both learning and rule-deduction algorithm, it's going to be a type of Lawful Stupid no matter how you look at it. Not that it's not impressive that it works at all for a range of many topics. It was likely profiled with Brexit, US Election and climate change relentlessly so these are the ones they are showcasing, but the fact it can even estimate it for other topics is nothing to sneeze at.

That said, I'm not a machine learning guy either. The above are the insights of a person with one undergrad course under his belt and a chess engine that even after feeding it over 1800 games (140 of which I curated for it by hand) played by world champions can be best described as "dumb as a brick".

Devac  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Perspective API: Using machine learning to score the toxicity of online comments

The problem seems to be in the strictness of the rules. This phrase by C.S. Lewis was judged as 7% 'toxic'

    I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.

Change every '.' with an exclamation mark, and lo, it's suddenly 1% more 'toxic'. End any sentence with more than one exclamation mark and you will see how it correlates it with toxicity. Add something like '#fail' and you are getting into the upper 40% with your toxicity. Lack or misused punctuation also counts as toxic. Some British English is also slightly less toxic than American English :P.

However, the shortest and most 'toxic' phrases I managed to make are:

80% "Pass a fag, mate"

78% "Death is murder!"

68% "Rape is a plant"

I could go on.

"Interesting, but not very smart." is both a good description and something that's only 2% 'toxic' ;)

EDIT: Also, ending the sentence with 'bro' will increase 'toxicity' only slightly (in the following example it even lowers it!) . Ending it with 'brah' will boost the 'toxicity' by quite a lot and it does so completely disregarding the preceding part of the sentence.

28% "Don't tase me, bro"

28% "Don't tase me, broseph"

29% "Don't tase me, bro!"

30% "Don't tase me, broseph!"

32% "Don't tase me" <- Baseline without exclamation

34% "Don't tase me!" <- Baseline for exclamation

45% "Don't tase me, brosephina"

47% "Don't tase me, brah!"

48% "Don't tase me, brosephina!"

ThatFanficGuy  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Dude. I appreciate you presenting a case so well. Way to go about testing shit.

kleinbl00  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Run it down this thread:

1) I'm a toxic mutherfucker

2) Because I cuss a lot

3) and whatever you say in an indoor voice, it isn't toxic.

I'm not a machine learning guy, but I don't know I'd describe the problem as "strictness" so much as "lack of context."

18%, by the way, 13% without point 1 and 11% without point 2.

bfv  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Paper. They're just looking at small windows of the text, building (very sparse) vectors along the lines of "1.0 if this sequence of n words/characters appeared in the text, 0.0 if not" and doing some voodoo with it. This is the sort of classifier marketing firms use to guess whether Twitter feels positively or negatively about something. You're not going to be able to do fine-grained classification of short texts that way and, unsurprisingly, "toxicity" looks a lot like vehemence.

kleinbl00  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I am nothing if not vehement.

Devac  ·  20 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    I don't know I'd describe the problem as "strictness" so much as "lack of context."

That's true, but applying strict rules with or without context (or boundary for applicability for that matter) is still a bad way to go about problem solving. Until the Perspective API will get more samples, curation of its conclusions or other improvements to both learning and rule-deduction algorithm, it's going to be a type of Lawful Stupid no matter how you look at it. Not that it's not impressive that it works at all for a range of many topics. It was likely profiled with Brexit, US Election and climate change relentlessly so these are the ones they are showcasing, but the fact it can even estimate it for other topics is nothing to sneeze at.

That said, I'm not a machine learning guy either. The above are the insights of a person with one undergrad course under his belt and a chess engine that even after feeding it over 1800 games (140 of which I curated for it by hand) played by world champions can be best described as "dumb as a brick".