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DWol  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Mzansi by natives 1: Somewhere to start

Thanks. I think you've actually captured my intentions quite nicely.

The primary reason why I wanted to do this was to try and capture my thoughts somewhere where it can have some value-add, and I think hubski is the right kind of space for that.

Underneath that is however the fact that I've been thinking a lot lately. I went through what you might call a "life changing" experience last year that really shifted my perspective on a lot of things.

South Africa is my home. I don't want to live anywhere else. But it's become clear to me that we can't just rest on our laurels and expect things to get better organically. At the very least it's necessary to start to define what kind of a future is the one I want for myself and those around me. This definition in turn requires that I grapple with the big issues so that I can have a clarity of purpose in what I do. 50% theoretical framework, 50% moral conviction.

The big question that umbrellas over all the others is one of identity and belonging. How do define myself and what I stand for in a country with mega baggage and a suspect future?

So no, it won't be a sociology lecture, not least because I'm an engineer but also because of the perception thing I spoke about - I can only work with what I've got and what I get from others (this touches a bit on the subsequent responsibility to hear what others have to say).

Lastly, being an engineer, this is really my first foray into 1st personal writing so you may need to be gentle in that respect!

kleinbl00  ·  48 days ago  ·  link  ·  

One of my favorite screenwriters is a South African engineer. You'll do fine.

DWol  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Mzansi by natives 1: Somewhere to start

Definitely more philosophical. It was constituted following a national canvassing of demands from the townships and homelands. So it was like the consolidated voice of a large percentage of the oppressed.

At the time, non-whites had incredibly limited political representation and so it was a major act of defiance to demand the things set out there. In fact the huge meeting where it was proclaimed was broken up by the police on the second day. A few years later the organisations involved would be banned.

Ever since it served as the foundation of the struggle (for most) in the sense that it showed what was required, culminating on its influence on the Constitution.

DWol  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Mzansi by natives 1: Somewhere to start

I'm not 100% sure what you mean. Do you mean the legal situation that led to the Charter being written in opposition to the laws of the time, or more around the process of its drafting?

arguewithatree  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·  

More like subsequent cases that uphold the charter. Or is it more philosophical than literal?

DWol  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Definitely more philosophical. It was constituted following a national canvassing of demands from the townships and homelands. So it was like the consolidated voice of a large percentage of the oppressed.

At the time, non-whites had incredibly limited political representation and so it was a major act of defiance to demand the things set out there. In fact the huge meeting where it was proclaimed was broken up by the police on the second day. A few years later the organisations involved would be banned.

Ever since it served as the foundation of the struggle (for most) in the sense that it showed what was required, culminating on its influence on the Constitution.

DWol  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Mzansi by natives 1: Somewhere to start

Thanks, I think this is a great question.

Certainly in the general sense there is agreement (with some caveats that I'll get into now-now). Within the Constitution the main source of these ideals is in the bill of rights (SS 7-39). The rest deals with more procedural stuff relating to how government will function etc. I believe the US constitution has a similar setup.

There is broad agreement largely because of the relatively consultative process which produced it - during the transitional period (~90s) there was engagement between the various political groupings and the old regime culminating in an interim constitution that paved the way for a democratically constructed one after the elections.

As such, it reflects the politics of the day - in South Africa the Overton window lies very much to the left, at least in the talk-space.

The devil is in the details however. There are two main issues/debates as far as I have eyes to see:

The first is the idea that the Constitution did not go far enough in pushing for revolutionary change. There is a view that is gaining more traction than it used to have that the 1994 dispensation represents a suspension of the revolution. I think there is perhaps something to this, although I cannot throw my weight behind it entirely. S 25 for instance guarantees the right to property and prohibits expropriation without compensation. The question is then how this squares with the process (which is mandated in the same section) of righting our history of marginalisation and dispossession. In essence, who should own the land and how to shift? I won't get into the specifics here but I hope it illustrates this type of clash.

The second issue is the question of how to actually do the practical legwork in trying to guarantee the rights. This is where the debate more commonly lies. For instance when people protest and demand access to sanitation, they can rest assured that the Constitution guarantees the right to adequate housing, with sanitation almost assuredly being a necessary condition for such.

There is yet much to be said here but hopefully that goes some way to answering your question!

DWol  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 5, 2017

Hi all

For the last while now I've been mulling over an idea to write a series of posts about some of the big debates and problems where I live in South Africa.

In many ways I think the (unique?) situation here has a lot that can be learnt from, so I wanted to canvas whether there would be any interest in something like that?

Maybe to give an idea, these are some of the types of things I'm thinking of:

Current symbolism vs historical value

How to navigate the space between symbolism from the past and its historical context? This is best exemplified I think by the removal of a prominent statue of British imperialist Cecil John Rhodes from its place at the University of Cape Town.

Spatial justice vs the invisible hand

The aftermath of forced removals and apartheid spatial planning have left immeasurably deep scars on South Africa's towns and cities. What must be done to deal with this legacy and where does the government's responsibility lie?

from Unequal Scenes

Some others

Decolonisation of curricula

Promotion of local languages vs English as the language of business, science etc.

Rights of local communities around mining operations

Fee-free higher education

The land question

Race, class and identity in post-apartheid society

etc.

So ja, maybe something along those lines. Curious to hear what people think. Mzansi by natives?

Cheers

De Waal

ButterflyEffect  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Honestly don't have much feedback to give, provided my general lack of knowledge on this subject. That said, I would certainly read further posts on the topics! Just your summaries had me interested.

Dala  ·  50 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I second this!

lil  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Please please write these entries. I'm very curious about S. Africa after Apartheid and after truth and reconciliation.

DWol  ·  555 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Do you have cash on you?

Haha yes I suppose this is confusing, I'm not talking about metered taxis but rather minibus taxis which operate more like public transport. They only drive certain routes and you just get on and off wherever along the way. At the moment there are a number of reasons why expecting them to have card machines would be strange but in terms of the future it's certainly possible that this might change.

As for the meter taxis, here there are two options: you can either use the fancier "brand name" guys which are starting to have card readers more often, or the pirate style guys who drive busted 1990 Camry's and take the taxi sign off the roof when the cops are nearby. Needless to say they don't take plastic.

As for POS I was under the impression that certain account/card packages do carry charges for the user. Otherwise I don't know why they would list it as a charge in the brochure? Like you say most people (myself included) don't worry about the cost to the vendor so ja...

Minimum transactions are just a thing here then I suppose, it might again have to do with preventing people from making large numbers of card transactions and racking up fees for the business - perhaps the fees are relatively higher?

DWol  ·  555 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Do you have cash on you?

This is pretty interesting.

I tend to use my card wherever I can but that doesn't cover nearly enough of the occasions where I'd spend money to say that I don't need cash and so I usually try to have what must be about 15 USD on me.

Firstly, taxis only take cash and actually I think they prefer coins. On campus I don't think any of the food vendors take cards and while there are ATMs it's quite a schlep with queues and all.

Not to mention that most of these transactions are going to be like 2 USD so the POS card charges wouldn't be pretty.

Bars/clubs are another one - minimum card transaction is often about 6 beers' worth so obviously it's best avoided. I also don't think I've ever seen anyone pay entrance with a card.

It would be nice if something like m-pesa would take off because after all that, carrying cash is a bit of a liability. Some people are saying that they have like 40 USD which is a bit much for me to risk...

edit: my roommate informs me that he never carries cash (mugging risk), and that he draws money when he does need it.

_refugee_  ·  555 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Hmm.

So I have an expense card for work, which means I am supposed to use that card and only that card (not cash) 99% of the time, basically whenever at all possible, on transactions that are applicable "business/travel expenses." I've run into cash-only taxis once or twice, but it's my understanding that in D.C. and even less metropolitan areas such as Richmond, VA, Square or other credit card readers are commonly used by cab drivers in order to make using a charge card possible. I was actually told there isn't a single cab in DC without a CC reader (truthiness may vary, but it was an attestation from a resident, so it is what it is).

You might live in an area where that isn't the case, but it strikes me as unusual for taxis not to change with the times, and we do live in a digital era now. Square can even let you send/receive cash for free (although I'm pretty sure you aren't supposed to if you are acting as a taxi driver or etc) and it converts your cell phone into a card reader.

POS card charges on vendors are not insignificant, but they're usually pennies on the dollar. While on small transactions that can actually cause a vendor to lose his profit or even lose a few cents (net negative), it's a) the vendor's problem aka the cost of doing business, and b) kind of how things work - you aren't going to make money on every transaction as a person running a business. Unless you have a real reason to care about the person you're paying (like: want to support small business; personally care about them; etc) I don't think it should be a reason not to use your card - but you may feel differently and that's okay. I just kind of feel that it is an expected, known cost of doing business for any and all vendors that enter the money-playing game.

I also have never seen a minimum card transaction requirement at a bar or club, but again, I'm not sure where you are located. For a long time those minimum requirements weren't legal, anyway. They became legal, kind of, As far as I can tell it's only legal for credit cards, due to those aforementioned limits, but where I live that's 2 rum-and-diets and I live in a cheap drinking area. Sure, it's 5 pabst since they're cheap (not including tip) but I'm really not familiar with the scenarios you're describing.

As for entry fee though, yeah, I think it always has to be cash.

I confess I take out money when I need it for a specific purpose and that's the only time I ever have cash usually.

briandmyers  ·  554 days ago  ·  link  ·  

A lot of small businesses in NZ will require a minimum transaction amount (usually $20) to use a credit card, and quite a few don't accept credit cards at all (but we do have a robust debit card system that has been in place for decades). Taxis here have an additional surcharge (fixed) for any card use. In Australia most taxis charge a percentage fee for card use - 5 or 10 percent, which seems outrageous to me, but it partially pays my salary, so I just grin and pay cash when I'm in Oz.

_refugee_  ·  554 days ago  ·  link  ·  

In Australia, the banking system simply doesn't have checks in any capacity.

(I had a coworker. His name was Brian. He talked a lot, and had once lived in Australia. Every conversation with him was a game of "How long until he mentions Australia?" That aside, the fact that checks simply aren't a part of their banking system at all fascinates me and I think is also rather forward-thinking of them. I hate checks.)

I know in the US, at least it used to be, that gas stations would charge you more per gallon if you used a card.

Thing is though, using cash mandates that a person be at the station to take your cash, which means the employer is paying someone to be there. It's actually much cheaper to make people pay all through machines, aka using credit/debit, in the long run.

briandmyers  ·  554 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Thing is though, using cash mandates that a person be at the station to take your cash

Not necessarily - there are machines that will take cash. That's the case for a lot of parking-garages here, and also things like car washes. No reason there can't be a cash-accepting machine at a gas station.

briandmyers  ·  554 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I moved here in '98 and I had a checking account for about a year or so before I got rid of it. Checks (cheques) are still around, but most people just don't have personal checks any more. Tax refunds come in a check, if you don't want to give the IRD (our IRS) your bank account details; also, I got a reparation check not long ago from the police; the funds came from the guy who stole my car last year, as part of his sentence.

DWol  ·  555 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Haha yes I suppose this is confusing, I'm not talking about metered taxis but rather minibus taxis which operate more like public transport. They only drive certain routes and you just get on and off wherever along the way. At the moment there are a number of reasons why expecting them to have card machines would be strange but in terms of the future it's certainly possible that this might change.

As for the meter taxis, here there are two options: you can either use the fancier "brand name" guys which are starting to have card readers more often, or the pirate style guys who drive busted 1990 Camry's and take the taxi sign off the roof when the cops are nearby. Needless to say they don't take plastic.

As for POS I was under the impression that certain account/card packages do carry charges for the user. Otherwise I don't know why they would list it as a charge in the brochure? Like you say most people (myself included) don't worry about the cost to the vendor so ja...

Minimum transactions are just a thing here then I suppose, it might again have to do with preventing people from making large numbers of card transactions and racking up fees for the business - perhaps the fees are relatively higher?

DWol  ·  591 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Non-American Users of Hubski, where are you from?

Put it down to like 50% lighting, 50% potato camera

DWol  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Non-American Users of Hubski, where are you from?

I wouldn't say usually, but often: In the summer it certainly is but in winter you also get a few nice days (that was one). The photo is from Cape Town, on the mountainside.

ThatFanficGuy  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Was it bright when you took the photograph? It seems like it would be if your camera's lightning sensitivity wouldn't've decided to play ball.

DWol  ·  591 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Put it down to like 50% lighting, 50% potato camera

DWol  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Non-American Users of Hubski, where are you from?

Hey guys, South Africa checking in...

I've been on the 'ski for quite a while now, don't really post that much though.

But enjoy this photo from a walk I took a while ago:

ThatFanficGuy  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Sweet. Is it usually like this there? Also, in which part of the country, navigation-wise, was the photo taken?

DWol  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I wouldn't say usually, but often: In the summer it certainly is but in winter you also get a few nice days (that was one). The photo is from Cape Town, on the mountainside.

ThatFanficGuy  ·  592 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Was it bright when you took the photograph? It seems like it would be if your camera's lightning sensitivity wouldn't've decided to play ball.

DWol  ·  591 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Put it down to like 50% lighting, 50% potato camera

DWol  ·  688 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What are you reading this week?

Ha, I think that's the first thing I checked... In one sense it's great that there can be so much uncertainty in the word when presumably the interpretation must have been obvious at the time it was written.

DWol  ·  688 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What are you reading this week?

Oh yay, someone else reading this! I peeked through the different sections and the commentary/lectures seem like such a great addition. What drew you to the book?

coffeesp00ns  ·  688 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I wanted to know what the first word was! I'd read Heaney's translation for school, and I knew the controversy of the translation.

DWol  ·  688 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Ha, I think that's the first thing I checked... In one sense it's great that there can be so much uncertainty in the word when presumably the interpretation must have been obvious at the time it was written.

DWol  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Take down the Confederate flag now

I suspect you're right in that most people perpetuating casual racism don't view themselves as racist. Like you say, there's a feeling that we've moved beyond race and that people should just get on with the bootstrap pulling.

When the flag represents nothing more to you than a shared cultural experience (using shared loosely considering that it's not really the most inclusive "share") then I'd say you have other issues at hand.

It shows that they haven't considered what it must be like to see the flag through any other lens than their own. Or perhaps more frighteningly, considered it but came to the conclusion that the other experience was not "that bad" or whatever.

IMO you'll never have any kind of meaningful reconcilliation until people are able to identify with the lived experiences of the other group.

edit: on rereading I see this might seem like I'm implying that you (BB) think this way - when I say "you" I mean it generally

BrainBurner  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

No worries! :)

DWol  ·  707 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Take down the Confederate flag now

Wow, when I heard Jon Stewart talking about the confederate flag flying over SC I assumed it was a metaphor...

I have a question though; forgive my ignorance but what exactly are people referring to when they say that the flag represents their heritage?

Is there any other facet to it than symbolising the idea that black people are not equal?

user-inactivated  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

White supremacy.

When people want "the blacks" to assimilate into "American Culture" they are demanding that African Americans swallow white supremacy whole.

BrainBurner  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

This is just personal spit balling, but I think I can understand why they feel this way. Southerners could see the flag as representing their communities: their customs, heritage, food, shared historical experiences, etc. In theory they could divorce this sense of community from the flag's history of racial prejudice. So they honestly may believe that they themselves are not racist, their community is not racist (anymore at least), and that the flag merely stands as a symbol of their community bond. Of course it's beyond naive to separate the flag's despicable racial past from it's use in modern times, but perhaps that's just the culture in South Carolina. I wouldn't know, I've never been.

bfv  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

    Of course it's beyond naive to separate the flag's despicable racial past from it's use in modern times

That's true, but then there's a reason one of the classic history books on the South was titled the Burden of Southern History. The confederate flag is a very good symbol. Tell someone who flies it that it's irredeemable because it's tainted by racism and you might as well be telling them that they're irredeemable because they're tainted by racism. Which might be what people who want it removed mean to say, but all the same these arguments are never just about the flag itself on either side.

BrainBurner  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I see, so by telling them they can't fly the Confederate flag because it's tainted by racism, we're saying they're tainted by racism. Which I imagine they resent because they likely don't consider themselves racist, whether this is true or not.

I think this raises an interesting question: Can the Confederate flag be redeemed? Can it ever be considered primarily a symbol of Southern community pride, and not a racist rallying point? I have a feeling this question and it's answer lies with minority communities, and it's something I personally cannot comment on.

ArtemusBlank  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I really don't think the Confederate Flag can be redeemed, a lot of people will see it as a symbol of racism and but also as a symbol of a bloody civil war that killed many young men. This flag is seen by a good number of people as a symbol of traitors and history rarely treats traitors well. Is Benedict Arnold ever really treated well after all these years?

nothingleftinside  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

Can the Nazi flag be redeemed?

BrainBurner  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

It's possible, but not likely. Certainly not in my lifetime, or my grandchildren's lifetime.

I guess the point I'm making is that many Southerners see the stars and bars purely as a symbol of Southern pride and culture, and not as a racist banner. I think in theory it could be viewed this way, but I imagine a large portion of the public, especially minorities, wouldn't buy into it, understandably so.

DWol  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

I suspect you're right in that most people perpetuating casual racism don't view themselves as racist. Like you say, there's a feeling that we've moved beyond race and that people should just get on with the bootstrap pulling.

When the flag represents nothing more to you than a shared cultural experience (using shared loosely considering that it's not really the most inclusive "share") then I'd say you have other issues at hand.

It shows that they haven't considered what it must be like to see the flag through any other lens than their own. Or perhaps more frighteningly, considered it but came to the conclusion that the other experience was not "that bad" or whatever.

IMO you'll never have any kind of meaningful reconcilliation until people are able to identify with the lived experiences of the other group.

edit: on rereading I see this might seem like I'm implying that you (BB) think this way - when I say "you" I mean it generally

BrainBurner  ·  706 days ago  ·  link  ·  

No worries! :)

DWol  ·  1190 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Facebook Is Buying WhatsApp

Just to add some more context to the question of "who uses whatsapp", in South Africa basically everyone with a smartphone uses it. It's a verb in the same sense as "google".

A while after BlackBerry started the adoption of smartphones with this baby it started to gain traction because it was cross-platform, unlike BBM at the time.

I use whatsapp to talk to friends, family, my debating students who live in a township, and my boss a few times. It's pretty ubiquitous.

Strangely, I have never paid for whatsapp. They keep extending the free period. I always assumed it's because they don't expect people in developing countries to be able to pay at all (not many people use PayPal/Google Wallet).

Everyone I spoke to today seemed at least skeptical of the merger.