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kleinbl00  ·  60 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: If life was fair would it still be interesting?

There will always be someone better off than you, there will always be someone worse off. For me, the goal is to always be better off than that guy I was last year.

b_b  ·  95 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Why Trump's Staff Is Lying

Spicer's presser reminded a lot of the early days of the Iraq war when Hussein's information minister was on TV saying that the Republican Guard was on the verge of victory, as CNN was showing US troops on the outskirts of Baghdad marching toward the city center. It was a lie of such ridiculous proportions that you got the sense watching it that truth or untruth wasn't really the point of the press conference.

Similarly, Trump's claim about the inauguration was so farcical that you got the sense that the administration was really trying to cultivate a relationship with the truth. There may have been a component of Trump testing Spicer's loyalty, but I think that was secondary to intentionally picking a fight with "the media" writ large. A strongman, a man trying to build a personality cult, needs a foil. Usually it's easy, because America is the default foil for strongmen the world over. Trump is in the position of being in the belly of the beast, so his foil has to be some other subversive element. The media is a good one, because (a) they write bad things about him that just happen to be "true", and (b) his constituency is already distrustful of them. In that sense they're perfect. And how did the administration react? They threatened to cut off access to reporters who questions them.

That's diabolically brilliant. When they announced that they might move the press corps form the West Wing, everyone shit a brick. They realized they couldn't do it without cause. So they went out and sewed the seeds. Spicer cam out a day later and was clear-eyed and friendly. Do we not also think that was calculated? Of course it was. Now he can say he's been trying to be the good guy, but you reporters just won't quit. Give it two more weeks. They'll come up with another whopper to top this one. And if you think Chuck Todd was mean to Conway about lying about inauguration attendance, just wait until they lie about something that matters. Real reporters will flip out, and it will be the perfect time to cut them out of the deal.

Devac  ·  96 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: When it's good to be bad

I have stopped reading right about here:

    And yet a new school of thinking is challenging these received ways and arguing that straying from the path, even engaging in hedonistic behaviour, might be the surest way to success.

so I will only conclude that author has learned some lesson. Better late than never. But since I know how the narrative in pieces like this goes, I went straight for the ending and got:

    That he ever thought he could achieve perfection, without setbacks, without respites, Franklin admitted, was his gravest error. He had been naïve. And prideful.

See? I was right. Good for him!

So, have some shit that I've learned from my father so far:

- In all likelihood you have only this one life, so try to be happy.

- Moderate yourself as much and long as you are comfortable (and I don't have to bail you out).

- Don't obsess over minor failings. Every problem is bigger that it really is on first glance. Look at it when you'll get over it.

- You probably don't know what you want.

- Don't be a dick. Or at least try to not be one and treat others as they deserve.

- Hard work or not, you are not entitled to anything in life. There's likely someone much better anyway.

- As with toilets, try to leave the place in at least the state you found it yourself.

- Fear is the mind-killer, but not everything requires higher mental faculties.

- You can strive for true perfection but you can never achieve it. It also applies to this list.

And I didn't even need to quote philosophers.

rezzeJ  ·  172 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Planet Earth II

You will not be disappointed. There's some extraordinary footage, as you would expect. One of my favourites was a chase scene between newly born Iguanas and pack of snakes.

Here's a part of the scene. I hope this isn't blocked for you guys in the US.

_refugee_  ·  187 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Insomniasexx and Randomuser weekend in Cali: Hubski Meetup

Actually, into his bag of holding.

nowaypablo  ·  261 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm back! And, alive! Not that I wouldn't be.

My goals at the moment including maximizing work efficiency, which I'll judge by how much sleep I can get per week after finishing all tasks. Apart from 18 credit-hours in my 1st semester and an average of 20 in the future, there are a ridiculous amount of random annoying tasks, especially as plebes, including taking out trash, sweeping halls, and delivering laundry to all cadets in your company. These duties also include maintaining a room standard, which is stupidly detailed and fairly difficult to maintain while you're living in the room. Inspection can occur during weekday business hours at the risk of punishment-- the punishment here is called Hours.

On that topic, hours means taking your parade rifle (an old wooden m14 we all keep in our room and use for drill/parades) and walking back and forth central area for x Hours. It blows. Also, you get your rank stripped away if the violation is bad enough, which adds a layer of ridicule when you're not actively completing your hours. As people get lazy and especially cynical, the risk of getting hours aggregates and the shit you eat is likely due to you by the time you receive it.

I haven't answered your question yet, I'm just ranting. But to try to answer your question, we learn everything any other college does, along with a hefty emphasis on maintaining a physical standard and a standard of discipline, aka "military bearing." It's a lot better than it sounds, because everyone going through it with a mind-blowing sense of humor makes playing the game not only tolerable, but a lot of fun.

I'd say the one thing I've learned so far is how far teamwork can go. Every second me or my buddies is out of the room or at a desk working, everyone else is behind them making sure they're covered and accounted for. I've been back on campus a few days and I've already had my ass saved by my roommates, and vice versa for sure.

My short-term goals include deciding between Persian and Arabic and getting squared away to take on the semester on Monday. My long-term goals include reaching the standard maximum on the APFT (Army physical fitness test) which consists of 71 push-ups and 78 sit-ups in 2 minutes each, followed by a 2-mile run under 13 minutes, and getting my GPA high enough to finagle my way into Princeton by the end of my sophomore year, just in case I decide not to commit to the Army.

The GPA is not just academic, it consists of 3 pillars: Athletic, Academic, and Military/Leadership. The 3rd is usually graded over the summer during military training and leadership details, the other 2 are accounted for during the school year. Your GPA dictates your class rank, which is critical at West Point. A high class rank means more opportunities, including travel and exchange programs (all-paid), but more importantly, being assigned the army branch of your choice, followed by the post of your choice.

So, let's say I'm 300th in my class. I'll most likely be assigned Infantry if I choose that branch because they always need more infantry officers. However, I may not be assigned a post with the 25th infantry div in Hawaii, even though it was my 1st choice, cause that clearly awesome gig is already taken up by the top 50 infantry branching cadets before me.

Otherwise, it's just college!

edit: also especially as a plebe my day could start anywhere from 0500 like it was during basic training, to 0600. Classes don't start till 0730 the earliest though, to give you a scope of how much shit goes on that isn't directly a class here.

edit2: Also it's like by far the most beautiful campus I've seen except for Amherst college but that's only because they have a cliff overlooking a crazy cool mountain. I'm right on the Hudson river in the Hudson river valley though so it's a close call. This place looks like fucking Hogwarts, straight-up. On morning runs, I'm usually greeted by a sunrise, a bright pink sky, and literal castle walls on my right with the Hudson river on my left.

There's a famous piece of journalism on the causes of the ~2008 financial crisis, specifically the housing bubble, called The Giant Pool of Money. There's one part that always stuck out to me, and seems incredibly relevant here, so I'll highlight it [emphasis mine, at the end]:

    Adam Davidson

    Right, the global pool of money, that's where our story begins. Most people don't think about it, but there's this huge pool of money out there, which is basically all the money the world is saving now-- insurance companies saving for a catastrophe, pension funds saving money for retirement, the Central Bank of England saving for whatever central banks save for, all the world's savings.

    Ceyla Pazarbasioglu

    A lot of money, it's about 70 trillion.

    Adam Davidson

    That's the head of capital market research at the International Monetary Fund, the place to go if you want to figure out how much money is in the world.

    [...]

    Adam Davidson

    And by the way, before you finance enthusiasts start writing any letters, we do know that $70 trillion technically refers to that subset of global savings called fixed income securities. Everyone else can just ignore what I just said. Let's put $70 trillion in perspective. Do this. Think about all the money that people spend everywhere in the world, everything you bought in the last year, all of it. Then add everything Bill Gates bought, and all the rice sold in China, and that fleet of planes Boeing just sold to South Korea, all the money spent in every country on Earth in a year. That is less than $70 trillion, less than the global pool of money.

    Alex Blumberg

    Wow.

    Adam Davidson

    We're talking about a lot of money.

    Alex Blumberg

    That is a lot of money.

    Adam Davidson

    And that money comes along with armies of very nervous men and women watching over the pool of money. Investment managers, they don't want to lose a penny of that. They don't want to lose any of that money, and, even more so, they want to make it grow bigger. But to make it grow, they have to find something to invest in.

    So, most of modern history, what they did was they bought really safe and, frankly, really boring investments like treasuries and municipal bonds, boring things. But then, right before our story starts, something changed, something happened to that global pool of money.

    Ceyla Pazarbasioglu

    This number doubled since 2000. In 2000 this was about $36 trillion.

    Adam Davidson

    So it took several hundred years for the world to get to $36 trillion. And then it took six years to get another $36 trillion.

    Ceyla Pazarbasioglu

    Yeah, there has been a very sharp increase.

    Adam Davidson

    How does the world get twice as much money to invest? There are lots of things that happen. But the main headline is that all sorts of poor countries became kind of rich, making things like TVs and selling us oil. China, India, Abu Dhabi, Saudi Arabia made a lot of money and banked it.

    China, for example, has over a $1 trillion in its central bank. And there are office buildings in Beijing filled with math geniuses, real math geniuses, looking for a place to invest it. And the world was not ready for all this new money. There is twice as much money looking for investments, but there are not twice as many good investments.

Mr_Scythe  ·  348 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Guilt...

After reading all this, I went outside, I walked-and walked-and thought... I thought more deeply than I ever had before.

My biggest thought was that as long as a had that phone, I would always be sinning. always

And then I went inside, got the phone, and went outside.

I turned it on, and it said "Notification: sent from your dad: How was school?"

Dammit... Thats when I decided... The owner has a life And I was stealing their phone...

My dreams are going to haunt the fuck out of me tonight.

I'm going to give it to the bus driver tommorow, and say I found it on the bus yesterday, but I forgot to give it to you.

Dammit, Yes. I'm going to lie... It's the only way to fix this.

Thank you guys... The advice was what actually got me to think

francopoli  ·  361 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Catching a Flight? Budget Hours, Not Minutes, for Security

I was going to write this up with links to facts and tons of data, but that is not what you need here. So, from some random asshole on the internet, stop for a second and hear me out. But first, a sound track No real reason for the 2nd, just what I am listening to now.

    Ok this is me having an anxiety riddled moment.

The reality of us as men living in the West is as follows. The number one cause of non-natural death for men under 40 is suicide. Number two? Car accidents. Then all work related injuries, then the category i loving call "hold my beer and watch this." Then and only then does homicide make the list. The only single health category that fits in the top 5 is cancer. Here is the 2013 list of all men in the USA, so everyone from newborns to the guys who died at 105. Crime in the US/Canada is at all time lows, something we here on Hubski have talked about in previous threads related to Stephen Pinker, for example. The reality of violent crime is that as long as you are not involved in the illegal drug trade, even if you are poor, the odds of you being injured in a crime are damn near zero. Look at that chart again. Crime is not even in the list. Homicide is on the list of black men and we should all be ashamed at that, but let's focus on the positives here.

You are more likely to be killed by a cop during a traffic stop than by a terrorist. There were 13,000 or so homicides in 2014; that same year there were closer to 45,000 automobile fatalities. This number includes about 5,000 on motorcycles. Why don't we freak out over the body count from cars? Because they are familiar. I am willing to bet that everyone here knows someone who has been impacted by an automobile fatality... How many of us know someone who died in a plane crash? Or a terror attack? Or any of the other big scary things we see on TV? Probably not many. That leads to a part of the problem.

    Is the world getting smaller?

Yes. When someone gets shot in the "bad part of town" it is all over the news. we can pull up google maps and street view the crime scene. We can measure how many blocks away the crime was. Even though the way cities work you are probably not going to interact with anyone involved with the event. You did not know this place existed until the news of the crime was all over the place. Now, think Pakistan. There was a terror bombing there in April that made national news. The local websites and news stations covered it with gruesome images of scared kids, bleeding women and dead bodies. Why? Because fear and panic sell advertising space, that is why. A plane crash in Russia that kills 30 people makes international news because plane crashes are very, very rare. After 9/11 people bailed on the airlines and drove instead. The high numbers of people on the roads versus the air lead to a statistical bump in fatalities from car accidents that rivaled the number of people killed in the attack.

    Are our lives getting smaller and more constrained? Are possible futures being killed in the crib as we slowly lose little bits and pieces of peace of mind and personal freedom?

Sadly, yes. Human beings are NOT RATIONAL CREATURES. Say that a fucking million times until it sinks in. We are emotional basket cases, and advertisers and marketing people spend billions on how to get that little reptile control portion of your brain to react before the monkey brain can kick in and say "stop, idiot!" Since fear and death and terror and horror and crime and murder and all the bad scary nonsense gets eyeballs, and eyeballs sell ad copy, well here we are. The two big cities here in Kentucky just finished up a massive planning outlay for the next 20 years. This plan impacts the lives of every single person living in the two of the 50 biggest population centers in the USA, more than 1/2 the state. And it impacts the way visitors travel through these two metro areas. These plans are nowhere on the main news websites. NOWHERE. But the attack in Pakistan is. The stupid shit Clinton and Trump are saying sure is. These plans marry us to the automobile for a generation, impact the density of the urban infill and impact the very air we breathe and water we drink. Why nowhere on the news? Because it is boring and you can't sell advertising around it. Land abatement, environmental impact trust transfers, zone density targets, and waste water control easements don't trigger the reptilian emotional response. Hell, the 4-5 people reading this probably instinctively tuned out reading that sentence; I'd doubt there are more than 5 people here on Hubski who even know what those things are (and I was one of them until I started getting active with the parks system and light pollution activism). I know those terms exist but I doubt I could explain them, so how is the bobble-head on the 5 O'clock news supposed to do that in 15 second blurbs around the crime footage? Yet, these plan gut public transport and change the way most of us out here will get to work, where we will work, and how much in taxes we pay to make it happen.

    I don't think I know a single person my age who associates any good feeling with airports.

That age is over. The joy I had meeting my dad at the gate after he came home from his dad's funeral, and the way his whole body shifted from a dour stoop to a standing tall smile when he saw his family greeting him and cheering lights up my memories damn near 40 years later, then I am saddened as this emotion is something that people today are not going to experience, ever again in an airport. The meeting at the baggage claim is one of business, not emotion: get the bags, jostle for room, get out. We've let fear trump sanity, and the needed changes to keep the bad guys off the planes have turned into a gong show instead. And as has been said elsewhere, if the bad guys really wanted to hurt us they'd never touch an airport ever again and instead buy a trucking company.

    We are not meant to resolve all contradictions but to live with them and rise above them and see them in the light of exterior and objective values which make them trivial by comparison.

That was said by Thomas Merton a monk who went to isolate himself from humanity only to realize that we need to work to make the place suck a little less for those who follow. I really wish I knew of the guy when I was still a Catholic... I'm not sure what the change would be, but I learned of him after moving out to Kentucky. The one good thing about religion is that there are a ton of people who wandered out into the nothingness and came back with insights into the human condition. When I stopped being the atheist asshole online and went back to read some of the non-canonical gospels I also started to read on the philosophers and monks for insights into why people do stupid shit. It did not help with the understanding, but I did get insights into Stoicism and in dealing with a world that I don't always feel a part of. Social media is not making us better as I had hoped when I first got on the internet over 30 years ago. It is also not making us worse... yet. The internet and social media is amplifying our common traits which is why the festering sewer that is Reddit will come through once in a while and raise money for a good cause or help someone out who has been wronged in some big way. It also feeds gofundme's of liars and opportunists and cultists, but that stuff existed before the internet only not as loud and profitable.

So what do we do? Ban carry on gear and force people to fly naked? Declare martial law, put cameras everywhere and end liberty? Or do we realize that there are real things that we can fight that will make things better, vote for people who won't make the situation worse, stand with our friends when they fall, fight the battles to make our homes better than when we found them? One of the reasons that I think the suicide rate is so high is the push-pull from living in a safe environment while being force-fed a steady pop culture diet of "OMG WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!!111!!" I've fought this part of my personal battle by disengaging from the media and the news. I read news instead of watch it as that helps me digest data slower and makes me think about it more. I love the work that the Green Brothers have done, but fuck me I cannot watch JUMPCUT their JUMPCUT videos JUMPCUT as I don't have a damaged attention span. Realize that people have been having this conversation for about, oh, forever, and we are not going to fix it now. But, we can make it suck less for ourselves and those around us, control our reactions to the world and do better than our parents.

There are still people alive who were born in the 1800's. Think about that world they came into. They lived to see Electricity and clean water become a thing. They lived to see the creation of the suburbs, the introduction of the automobile, two World Wars, the end of the Ottoman Empire, the end of the British Empire, 1/3 of all US history, the rise of the educated American Middle Class, the end of Jim Crow, gay people and inter-racial couples not being killed for whom they love. They lived to see controlled powered flight, then jets, then space, all before they hit 70! They lived to see Measles, Polio, Whooping Cough, and Small Pox, wiped out of most of the human population. The diseases that filled the old cemeteries with the corpses of kids and infants, GONE. So gone in fact the anti-vax movement can take hold because the institutional memories of burring infants and toddlers does not exist here in the west. Radio, Television, movies, the Internet all came to be in their lifetime! Think about the wonders we will see in the next 50ish years. And stop watching video news, it exists to make you feel like shit so you by the Testosterone 5000 car and the body soap sold by the guy with muscles on his muscles. We are all on an involuntary rapidly accelerating train ride that ends six feet in the dirt feeding worms. And every one of us is fighting the same battle you are. Welcome to the suck, man; embrace it and enjoy the adventure wherever it takes you.

goobster  ·  373 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Stephen Fry's Blog post on Social Media.

I've been online since the early 1980's. Bulletin Board Systems. Email. The WELL. Usenet. Hand-coded web sites. eWorld. Tribe. LiveJournal. MySpace. Blogger. The original incarnation of Tumblr. Facebook. Blah blah blah.

What every commenter has missed in this thread, is the fact that Stephen Fry's article has nothing to do with technology... it's a love song to the rebellious nature of youth. And that it is the rebels who move the world forward. Not the sheep following along single-file behind the leader. He mourns the loss of the rebellious spirit of youth.

Women wore pants to rebel.

Rebels rejected the 2.5 kids and a white picket fence "nuclear family" and embraced communes, roommates, and living alone.

Punks tried to tear down every societal norm to rebel.

Metal heads applied skill and craft to rebellious ideas and tools and developed a finely honed precision to their rebellion.

Grunge rejected the precision of metal and went sloppy. Both in clothing and technology.

Rap rebelled against the structure of a band, and the assumption the front man should sing.

Every single one of these things were driven by the young, rebelling against the ways of the old.

Stephen Fry makes the simple point that the most common thing - the thing that Advertisers love, the thing the mass media has fully embraced, the thing even your parents are doing - is Social Media. So the most rebellious thing you could do is dump these tools of the modern bourgeoisie, and go analog.

Talk in person.

Make things with your hands.

Don't buy in to the machine and become a cog in their wheel... opt out! You don't HAVE to be on social media. You don't HAVE to have email.

The case he makes is that people like he and I have lived in both worlds, and by personal experience we know that both are valuable. But being electronically connected is now the norm. Adults today have grown up with screens and internet connections. These are today's Normal.

But rebellion is about fighting against the norm.

So the most rebellious thing one can do now is opt out of the digital advert-verse, and engage people in a real way. Face to face. Don't offer up your eyes, your mind, your time, and your soul, to advertisers, just to get another momentary endorphin jag.

The comments in this thread are really pretty funny to me. And a bit sad and pathetic at the same time... seeing people clutch so hard to something, as it cuts into their hands and the blood runs down their arms and they cry "I'm fine! Don't touch me!" and cower in the corner...

The internet is a tool.

A needle is a tool.

Put heroin in the needle, and you'll become unhealthily obsessed with the tool.

Put yourself on social media, and your internet becomes an obsession, rather than a tool. Now YOU are a tool of the advertisers. Rebel. Don't offer yourself up to be lied to. Go where they can't get you. Rebel.

necroptosis  ·  521 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Chocolate covered bacon-wrapped marshmallows

How appropriate to see this after reading the "Why it was easier to be skinny in the 1980's" article

user-inactivated  ·  522 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Internet firms to be banned from offering unbreakable encryption under new laws

Well if they get to use it and we don't then the public scrutiny part of the encryption becomes nullified, meaning that just another Chinese/Russian team to analyze their ciphertext would have a higher probability of breaking it.

Nobody would willingly do public analysis on the cryptography if it served no benefit to them and likely made them a candidate for getting arrested ("YOU BROKE OUR STATE SECRETS!!!!", it would probably be advertised by the media as "Professor hacks into the NSA" or something equally stupid, which wouldn't be accurate at all).

I reread the article and "making encryption illegal" is actually not what is being proposed here. It's so hard to keep track of all of these anti-encryption laws being proposed now since so many people are jumping in on the game and generally have no idea what they are talking about.

This particular law is about ending "end-to-end" encryption as mentioned Apple's iMessage and FaceTime information. Well, this has less ramifications on economics and wouldn't affect banking institutions (though companies would still be ticked off and move away from the UK just to restructure their entire network infrastructure and code), but it still has far more overreaching problems.

For instance, many companies use S/MIME for email communication for both signatures (to make sure the message came from where it says they came from) and encryption of the data itself for preventing corporate spies from stealing data or criminals stealing sensitive data being passed around. This is built into Microsoft Exchange, for instance, though only a small portion of Exchange services use this feature. Usually it's a large corporation that uses it for everyone or just for executives whose communication can affect the companies outcome. This is, however, end-to-end encryption that would be impossible for a government agency to come into and read the email if they had access to the servers (without scripting some weird "send me your key" feature which I guess is possible as well).

So this isn't making "link encryption" illegal such as TLS or VPN tunneling (which is what the FBI director wanted, he wanted a backdoor into TLS), which basically just encrypts the traffic from your computer to Google's servers and then on Google's servers it is unencrypted at some point and intercept-able. Skype, for instance, uses link-encryption and they can intercept your call information (and NSA's PRISM taps into this). If FaceTime is end-to-end encrypted, then PRISM-like spying cannot actually intercept your FaceTime calls. There are still ways to do it, it's just much harder (you have to break into the iPad/iPhone of one of the ends, which is potentially illegal for them to do under most circumstances (not all), and much harder to pull off since they have to bypass firewalls or inject code via some other means (browser exploits, app exploits, etc).

So what does this really accomplish? Not a whole lot, actually. It's bad for the consumer since their communication can be easier to intercept by criminals. Take for instance the Sony hack. Those criminals or nation-states or whomever it really was were so deep into Sony's network that they could have easily spied on people's communications on the PSN network since it was link-encryption based. Sony's email servers weren't using S/MIME or anything like it clearly, since their executive's emails got leaked.

Imagine the government saying "Sorry Sony, but your new method of protecting against hacks like the one you just experienced is now illegal, sorry." I mean that's basically something that would get Sony to lobby against the government to prevent a bill like this from happening, and also likely to have Sony say "screw you" to the US/UK and just leave (they are a Japanese based company, after all). They'd still sell PS4s and such, just not have any corporate offices in those countries.

So, even pushing back against end-to-end encryption would have major repercussions against your economy and legal system, and there are plenty of corporations that would prevent that from happening (never thought I would be happy that corporations were lobbying the government... but when the government is making this little sense then corporations are the only people who can do anything about it).

The other thing to note about this is that if you make link-encryption legal while making end-to-end encryption illegal, you haven't actually accomplished much in regards to technology. Both systems use the same encryption algorithms and methods, they just configure that encryption differently. So OpenSSL or Crypto++ or whatever will still be libraries that would be legal to use since they are required for usage in TLS, but you could easily use those libraries to do full end-to-end encryption, and terrorists and pedophiles will be able to use those algorithms just fine. It might be black-market software at that point but who cares to them, they are already committing heinous crimes, whats to stop them from breaking an encryption law that even university professors would be willing to break?

Anyway back to your question (and off the topic of link-encryption and this article since I derailed the conversation accidentally), encryption for government use only is not practical since basically you'd be handing criminals and non-criminals alike a big pile of your credit card information and passwords without them needing to try. Right now they have to bypass or break encryption (likely bypass) to get at that kind of information and if the company does the encryption correctly it would be near impossible to get at.

Also think about DRM mechanisms. The only way that these systems work is through encrypting their media content on the disk and having a system of decrypting it on individual players. This is the only actual way to perform this kind of protection. So, do you think media companies would be very happy to hear, "DRM is now illegal to produce"? Actually it conflicts with existing laws, so it's not even possible to pass a blanket no-encryption law. They could add a list of exceptions, though, which would just end up being completely silly and restrict the development of new technology.

lil  ·  614 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Feeling sad after meeting with my old advisor today

    But I can't help but feel all weepy about everything I left behind. :(

How lucky you are to feel weepy. How beautiful it is that you do. Imagine how awful your undergraduate years would have been if all you feel is joy at getting away from it all.

Good memories of happy satisfying times will always be tinged with a little sadness because they are past. The sadness is a way of honoring the memory, deepening its meaning. Those same memories that are making you weepy are exactly the experiences, connections, and relationships that made you strong enough to take this next step of going TO something new and important, not just running away from a dark place.

Does that make sense?

Fallexe  ·  630 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Can someone explain to me what the hell is up with the Dota 2 community?

No, I think that friendships with people who believe differently from me are valuable.

For me, I view a persons beliefs as a result of upbringing and culture plus biological tendencies.

If I isolate myself from "bigots" not only do I lose access to people who might actually be right (albeit partially) I also lose the ability to help change their views.

EDIT - in my personal story, people who took the time to befriend me in spite of my bigoted beliefs changed my values, albeit after many years....

kleinbl00  ·  638 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Lion Murderer Walt Palmer has done more for conservation than you have

So check it.

First off, you can't say that there wasn't outrage over Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown or Sandra Bland. There just wasn't white outrage. The Facebook Freaks who light up about dead lions are different than the ones who light up about dead black people and you're right - #blacklivesmattermorethanlions.

But it's really fuckin' easy to get your dudgeon on - as a privileged white person - about privileged white people hunting and killing lions. It ain't so easy to get your dudgeon on - as a privileged white person - about privileged white people hunting and killing black people.

Especially when it's accidental. Especially when it's systematic. Especially when it's institutionalized. Especially when all the circumstances arrayed around the deprecation and endangerment of African American citizens is perpetrated largely for the benefit of privileged white people.

Assume you're the most enlightened high-fivin' white guy in Grosse Pointe. You know you aren't going to be welcome at the rallies, so that's isolating. You know that a not-small proportion of the black race is going to hold you accountable for something you aren't (directly) responsible for, so that dulls the dialog. And you know that no amount of Tyler Perry DVDs are going to give you any credibility among black people so you can't even pretend to relate.

So you don't.

And then you and I - and we get along - I have to say lame-ass shit like "the silence you hear is an awkward silence" like it makes a difference. And I have to put forth arguments like "if we could talk about this stuff we wouldn't have so many problems" as if it solves anything. And even then, I'm scared shitless because two people who can see 100% eye to eye are likely to tear each other apart because both feel helpless from different sides of the issue.

The cartoon is on point. "He deserved it" is the bullshit trope that every white organization will try on because their white audience wants to believe they live in a colorblind world. I mean, we got a black president so STFU already. And even I recognize that it's easy for me to say we "both feel helpless from different sides of the issue" but odds on, the LAPD is gonna call me "sir" and pat you down. So my "helpless" is more like "awkward" while yours is more like "legitimately fearful for your life."

But the reason race dynamics are so fucked up is that "sorry, our bad" doesn't cut it and at a Facebook level that's all we're capable of so we change the subject to something safe like "let's all hate on big game hunter dentists."

It is a "sensitive issue." That it's a sensitive issue is fucked up, no doubt. I can't defend it. All I can do is try to explain it.

My mother loves to tell the story about the Malcolm X rally she went to. About how she went to pull an apple out of her bag and was suddenly surrounded by six burly black dudes. Entirely appropriate on their part, entirely inappropriate on hers - as one of two white people at a Malcolm X rally, if there was gonna be a gun in a purse, it would have been in hers. That was 50 years ago; you'd think we'd have gotten better by now. We haven't. It's awkward, and much harder to talk about than dead lions named Cecil.

OftenBen  ·  639 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Dear hubski, why are you proud of yourself?

Well, when I joined hubski I was only going to school half-time with terrible grades, pretty overwhelmingly depressed with all the fun that brings, and I was certain that even if I graduated I'd never get a job that would allow me to live independent from my parents.

Since then I've graduated, found meaningful full time employment that continues to pleasantly surprise me with perks. I got a pretty kick ass new apartment (For the area/my price range) and I'm slowly furnishing it myself. (Still need a dining table and a bed that doesn't need an air pump.) This is all pretty normal stuff, but for somebody who struggled for a long time to find a good argument against suicide, it's a big deal.

j4d3  ·  641 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Map of the US in 1947, from the point of view of Californians
thenewgreen  ·  653 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: ▶ Wilco Album "Star Wars" free album stream and free download

thenewgreen, sitting at his counter, headphones on, raised his arms triumphantly after track two and proclaimed, "holy fuck, this is good."

I've been in such a dark and dismal place these past few weeks. I'm deep in the depths of just trying to stay afloat in waters that I never thought I'd be treading in. Trading one corporate master for another. Fuck.

After the third song I laughed triumphantly and my wife raised her head from behind the back of the couch and looked at me like I am crazy. -I am.

I said to her, "this, this is what I was born to do."

"You change your mind all the time," she said.

I replied, "But, really... I don't. It's always music. It's the constant."

She's referring to the various startups I create. I am pathologically creating business ideas. But music (and Hubski) are the only ones that I've never considered a "business."

Anyways. I'm digging listening to this. It's brought some clarity to a dismal situation. Even if I have to slang crap for corporate america for the rest of my life, I'll always have the music I make.

This weekend I will record. A lot.

veen, I should have shouted out to you and flagamuffin. Have a listen.

user-inactivated  ·  656 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The limitations of the moderation systemx 2

if I want to check on them, I can log out and see everything, or perhaps visit their profile specifically.

hubski shouldn't try to facilitate amnesty on behalf of someone whose presence is clearly not wanted.

as it stands, hubski even allows blocked people to send PMs, which is absurd

kingmudsy  ·  657 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 131st Weekly "Share Some Music You've Been Into Lately" Thread

Leon motherfucking Bridges.

I've seriously bonded with my dad over this music. It reminds him of 60's soul and blues, and it's new enough to not feel dated for me. Give the whole album "Coming Home" a listen, there are some amazing gems in there!

user-inactivated  ·  662 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Do you feel that Reddit culture has had a negative influence on your ability to hold reasoned discussion?

As a non-English-speaking person, I did learn a lot of puns from Reddit. Reading a reasoned discussion and a joke answer both helped.

betsujin  ·  665 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The Lonely End: In aging Japan, thousands die alone and unnoticed every year.

For the younger generations, I think it's a little more complex than being obsessed with work and tech.

For those that grew up in the bubble years, a large number of men seem to be looking for someone to take their mother's role. Someone who will be home when they get back from work, have dinner ready, the house clean, kids in bed and a hot bath ready - the stereotypical 50s housewife in American terms. More and more Japanese women don't want this - they want a career and to be on equal terms with their husbands. They also face little to no financial pressure to marry since a large portion of single Japanese people live rent free with their parents until marriage, so they have a rather large disposable income to do what they would like, either alone or with friends.

For the "millennial" Japanese, they have many of the same problems that generation sees in America - a lack of jobs. Japanese companies have moved away from the lifetime employment that used to be the norm, and more and more jobs are contract or part-time work. Especially for young men, there is an enormous amount of pressure to get a full-time company job like their father has, and when they can't meet this expectation there is a tendency to withdraw socially.

Combine both of these with the a culture that's still fairly bound in tradition and hasn't really accepted women's rights as a whole, and it's not really that surprising that women aren't just jumping to give up their careers to get married and have kids.

With that being said, most Japanese people still want to get married (somewhat older survey, admittedly), and Japanese people are having sex.

Japanese people definitely aren't having children, but this is more of a developed country problem than a Japanese problem. If you look at birth rate by country, Japan is one of the lowest, but depending on which data set you look at, Germany is lower, and that's with a much higher immigration rate that should help that figure go up. However, no one seems fixated on the idea that Germans aren't having sex.

Look at fertility rate by country. Per the CIA Factbook, South Korea is at 1.25 to Japan's 1.42, but no one seems focused on the end of South Korea as we know it.

Wacky Japan sells; panty vending machines, hikikomori, rabbits on leashes - we've built up an image of this weird place that is so different than what we're used to, and it's easy to type up a quick story on a slow news day. The truth is, it's not so different than anywhere else in the west if we weren't allowing a fair amount of immigration.

kleinbl00  ·  668 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Last Week Tonight: Transgender Rights

I rescind the majority of my comments made on this post. The tone of the article pissed me off and clouded my judgement. The simple fact is it's the media's responsibility to protect the disenfranchised and shame the hateful and the fact that most of America is at sea regarding discussing transgender issues means the media needs to step UP, not step back.

I do think that the discussion needs more care than NYMag feels it deserves but the discussion does need to happen.

kleinbl00  ·  683 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: The First Ever Email, the First Tweet, and 10 Other Famous Internet Firsts