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WanderingEng  ·  38 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: January 17, 2018

While I have no background that qualifies me to judge art, I love your drawings. I hope you keep doing them and sharing them.

tacocat  ·  49 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Post a Datsun

tacocat  ·  98 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Colin Kaepernick will not be silenced.

I'm proud of what he's done and I think he's an awesome dude. But he's not an upper echelon quarterback. BUT the Dolphins signed Smokin Jay Cutler out of retirement so Kaepernick is a whole lot better than some starters in the league now. And now I have to politely ignore a bunch of conversations about how much Kaepernick is a spoiled whiner who sucks.

I hate everyone.

lil  ·  103 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: This is my tarot

OK, to answer your question

Position 10: The Ace of Pentacles. This card suggests that we will keep going

We may get cut down, but like the tree stump in this card, it is still alive with new branches growing from it. We don't know what has become of the old tree? All that remains are its many rings - it was old, but not wise enough to sustain itself.

The glow in the centre of the stump keeps it alive leading to the new growth.

Stay grounded, leave the light on in your heart.

kleinbl00  ·  146 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Mapping’s Intelligent Agents: Autonomous Cars and Beyond

    What I'm apparently failing to explain is that I want more consideration, not less.

What you're explaining loud and clear is that you feel the people responsible for the truth on the ground are not giving it the proper consideration. When I called you out for arguing (as a grad student) that you knew better than the law, you doubled down:

    That's not my luminary genius insight but professor after professor after professor has taught me.

I took one (1) acoustics class. It was taught by the two acoustics Ph.Ds at UW. And we started the class with one of the profs explaining the measurement rig he had pointed out the window: see, the buses outside were loud, but it was spring and soon the trees would be covered in leaves and it would be much quieter. et voila. Acoustics.

We believed him - I mean, I was 22 and the actual math of the attenuation of a shit-ton of leaves is intensive. Nonetheless we never did end up comparing beginning and end. Once I started working in the field I relayed this story to my boss and she laughed uproariously and showed me the B&K chart listing attenuation on the x and "meters of forest in hundreds" on the y.

These are acoustical professors with Ph. Ds prestigious enough in their department to fund a boat that flips on its tail for sonar studies. And we learned all sorts of great stuff about nodal analysis, resonance, deep channels and the like which provided a fundamental basis for the practical knowledge that I then picked up in the field. Because "practical knowledge" wasn't their thing - they were busy rewriting the theory. And for environmental acoustics, the theory was laid out by a dude a hundred years dead.

We'll disregard my profs' erroneous assumptions about the way environmental acoustics work. We'll even disregard the fact that when they were busted, they shined it on as if it never happened. We'll focus instead on their attempts to broaden the body of knowledge that we all benefit from and thank them for it. We'll even spot them the assumption that if my boss were to walk into that room and give them a lesson on the acoustical isolation of leaves, they'd listen interestedly, ask intelligent questions and have a rigorous debate about the mathematics at play.

Because nobody comes out ahead when we assume everyone else is a fucking idiot.

FIIC. Field Impact Isolation Class. A two-digit number that takes two trained professionals two days and ten thousand dollars worth of equipment to arrive at. Lucrative, no? I mean, we couldn't roll one for less than $3k. Which means we didn't get to roll them nearly often enough. And we spent a day burning through the math in custom bullshit Excel spreadsheets that sucked and that wasn't any fun either. So when we were presented with an opportunity to test some composite floors so we could build up some better mass law models, my boss paid me to schlep concrete and sand up to the 4th floor of a condo for six weeks so we could do our own testing. Contribute our own models. Put in our own research.

I billed out at $150 an hour, dude, and she sank 240 hours into it.

So I'm glad you're "all worked up." You should be. You "want the underlying assumptions, biases and structural issues unearthed and discussed" which can only mean you think they aren't. You "want to know in which context they work and in which context they don't" as if you think people don't fight over this shit every goddamn day. And I've been trying to say this a dozen different ways and you aren't hearing it, probably because it's offensive, and because it assails your worldview:

The experts in the field know more than the people they measure.

That's it. That's my beef. That's my fundamental observation, that in any esoteric body of knowledge, the practitioners of that knowledge know more about that knowledge than the people who encounter that knowledge glancingly. No matter how broad your evaluation of mapping and GIS, it will never be as focused as the mid-level bureaucrat in some forgotten town who has jurisdiction over where roads go in his township.

The argument put forth in your essay is that the experts are fucking idiots. When I tried to find something about objective vs. relational you came back with "no, it's that the experts are fucking idiots." When I came back with "you know, the experts I've worked with seem to know their shit" you came back with "they don't know it nearly enough because research." So yeah. I'm fucking offended. Your argument hinges on the idea that the practitioners of a science are incurious about the theory of the science, which is the argument people always make, so often that you actually whipped out

    So you sound to me like yet another arrogant engineer who thinks their numbers are always a good enough substitute for the truth.

Dude.

DUDE.

The "arrogant" engineers are the ones that know they know more than you and are sick of having to explain it. They're the ones whose knowledge is called into question because somebody just did a study somewhere. They're the ones being forced to (temporarily) rewrite their entire code of behavior because some expert somewhere in another unrelated field has better PR.

These are Assistive Listening Devices. They cost about $300 each, plus about $1000 for the transmitter. And thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you have an auditorium that holds more than a hundred people you have to have enough of them for five percent of the audience. That means if you have a school somewhere with a gym that seats 300 people, $5500 is going to be spent on shitty FM radios that nobody ever listens to... rather than band instruments, rather than gym equipment, rather than art supplies.

This happened because a well-meaning audiologist argued back in the mid-80s that deaf people were being left out of public events because they couldn't hear, and a lot of them couldn't afford hearing aids, so clearly any public building should be forced to pay to bring them in so that they would be "handicapped-accessible." And none of them ever get used - you wanna stick someone else's grody earthing in your ear? - but they're mandated by law and building inspectors across the US have to count the fuckers every time there's a permit issue. Millions of these things, mouldering away in closets.

Repeat for in-class reinforcement, smartboards, etc. What usually happens next is some journalist gets a bug up their ass to investigate waste and comes after whatever the it-thing is and administrators are pilloried for wasting money on that thing that only has one study to back it but ALS has hung on for three decades because the ADA was written by the Pope, effectively, so here we are. But fundamentally? People who don't know telling people who do know bones it for everybody.

My argument, simply put, is it's dangerous and offensive to assume that the people doing the majority of the work are in the knowledge minority. And the fundamental argument put forth by this argument - and by you - is that if we have a number, and everybody agrees on it, it reflects calcified thinking and oppression of the populace.

    I don't want to paradigm shift my way to glory, I want people to stop and think about the values and methods they pick.

The only way you could want this is if you hold deeply the idea that "people" aren't already doing it.

And fuck right off with that shit.

steve  ·  194 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: If someone gives you a badge, can you then give it away?

I think that badges don't go to "you" per se... they go to the post. So this post has been badged, not you.

There is a secret sauce algorithm that determines when you earn badges to spend (posts, comments, shares, etc). That algorithm might include a factor of having your content badged... That I don't know.

I hope that helps.

> I would argue that the hacker had done more to earn money than Coindash had, but I'm devoutly anti-ICO at this point.

Seriously! No joke, these scammers have finally got almost the same payday that they've been working on for over a year! These ICOs are like 30 days of marketing. These scammers are like up all night, buying domains, writing copy, deving crazy tools, adjusting based on user feedback. 😂

...

rd95  ·  230 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: We’re losing a whole generation of young men to video games

Warning: Sophomoric Ramblings Ahead

I saw this posted the other night, last night? This morning? Shit, I dunno, this weekend has been a blur, but I've been rolling things around in my head a bit since I've read this.

I read an opinion piece the other day, I think The Guardian, that threw out the statistic that if you were born in America in the '50s, you had a 90% chance to exceed your parents' income. If you were born in the '80s, that dropped to 50%. I can only assume it's been dropping since. Just throwing that out there, though I don't know how accurate it is.

I've been pretty bitter the past few years. House hunting and job hunting simultaneously and coming up with nasty disappointment on both fronts does a lot to color my perception. It's not about the money. It never has been. It's about respect. All I want is a job where when people ask me what I do for a living, and I tell them, their eyes light up and say "Wow. That's an interesting job," and then follow up with questions out of genuine interest and not some awkward feeling of social obligation to propel a conversation forward. I don't want a big house, or a fancy house. I just want a solid house. Hell, I'd be willing to give up over half the stuff I own to live in a small house, just as long as I have a house. There's something about owning your own place, not living with others, not paying a landlord, that says "You see this guy? He has his shit together and he made it." I got neither. It makes me feel like a bum and a failure as a husband sometimes, though I know Dala doesn't hold it against me.

People talk about movements on here and other places on the internet all the time. Tiny houses. Sharing economies. Community gardens. This that and the other. I sometimes wonder if people are pursuing these things out of an equal sense of desire for simplicity and smallness, acceptance of their fate that they have to do more with less, and an embracing of creativity and entrepreneurship.

This weekend I paid for my gas with the random handful of bills I had in my wallet, not because I'm broke, but because that's what I had on me at the time. It wasn't near enough to fill up my tank. It reminded me of when I was broke and I was kind of nostalgic for it. I hate the fear of being broke and never want to go back to that, but I miss being forced to be simple. I have too many books and antiques and stuff. I'm constantly getting rid of it. I'm constantly getting more. I'm constantly getting frustrated with myself about it. I don't know how to break the cycle and I've been trying for years.

Sometimes I wonder if being forced to do more with less will eventually be good for America. I think we have too much. A few months back, I drove through the part of town with the multi-million dollar mansions. They're obscene. I found myself frustrated with the people inside because I don't think they deserve their money, because even if they came by it honestly, they also came by it because they're willing participants in a system that exploits others. Here, there, yesterday, tomorrow. Then they take this money and buy things they don't need instead of using it to try and fix the world. It seems so unjust. Then I look at myself, with my nice car, my nice food, my overwhelming collection of stuff, and I think, to someone else somewhere else, they'd look at me and think I'm being just as obscene.

The thoughts in that last paragraph have been on my mind for months now. I've just been trying to figure out how to share them without sounding like a melodramatic child.

So since francopoli posted this, I think about the job. I think about the house. I think about what I want versus what I already have versus what other people want and have or don't have and then I don't know what to think anymore. But I think it might be time to be done complaining, because complaining doesn't fix things for me or for anyone else, it just adds to the frustration and resentment. But if I stop complaining, then I have to start asking questions, and if I start asking questions, I have to start figuring out how to answer them.

That takes introspection. That takes work. That takes commitment. That's big and scary. When I think about those things, then look at people who avoid life's problems through entertainment or drugs, or people who blame others instead of asking themselves questions, I don't know if I can really fault them for it. After all, in a way, isn't that kind of what we all do in our day to day lives? Distract ourselves? Make excuses? Pass the buck . . ?

veen  ·  256 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Analyzing Token Sale Models

I found one buried in an /r/ethtrader post somewhere: https://icostats.com/.

Specifically, check out ROI since ICO in the sidebar and toggle ETH in the top right corner.

keifermiller  ·  267 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Homelessness up 26% in LA YoY, 10% in Seattle , *61%* among LA youth

    needed

inevitable

What does UBI boil down to? It's a prop to keep capitalism from running off the rails once society no longer carries the structures that made it a stable social arrangement.

But it needs to do more than that to work in the long haul.

It needs to support the current economic system and it needs to suppress the reorganization of society around whatever new social structures emerge. Because those laborers are indeed human beings. If they're freed up, they're going to go into society and create new complexity.

And that newness is going to give rise to something else.

cgod  ·  273 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: An Essay from 1922: Why I Quit Being So Accommodating

He makes that point by the end of the essay.

_refugee_  ·  317 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: April 12, 2017

hey perhaps more importantly I GOT AN ETSY STORE OPEN AGAIN

https://www.etsy.com/shop/BroganBooks?ref=hdr

Got 9 listings up as of this AM but something like 5 additional book styles/covers need to be added before my total inventory's represented. What I'm saying is hit that F5 through the day and through tomorrow too and get me some pagevyaaas. Spend some money. Spam people with my link.

And in May I'll have a vendor table at a little local art hall event one of the bars I like holds every month. That is far scarier than the Etsy shop, fwiw. But I'm committed. Eek.

kleinbl00  ·  399 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Democrats, it's time to hunker down

if Andy Kaufman were a blogger

I'm not joking and I don't think my views are dumb.

I'm comfortable with you not agreeing with me, you have your own belifes and values, doesn't make you right or me wrong to value and worry about different things.

Nice knee jerk, doesn't agree with me so it's dumb.

Devac  ·  438 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: A Patriot Game Theory

📰🇷🇺🏆, 😨👊

thenewgreen  ·  440 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Today's Writing Prompt: Advice to a Poet

Thanks for the inspiration lil. Anyone, feel free to add to this: rezzeJ, steve, flac, coffeesp00ns, zebra2

Don't give advice to poets

They'll be living in your house

Before you know it

They'll be sharing your bed

They'll be filling your head

With some nonsense about wind

Don't give advice to poets

They'll leave you with no words left

And you'll know it when you can't say your own name

For fear that its a lame expression of your "truth"

They're all imagery and meter

She'll look cute but you don't need her

She'll start wearing your clothes

And swear that they're all hers

(she'll take your pets her clerics)

Don't give advice to (no) poets

You can shout about nuance but it won't carry the weight of a whisper about simplicity.

Truth is optional.

bfv  ·  473 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: It's election day America!

No one really cares about all those states in the middle of the country, right? And Republicans love anything defense-related? I propose ambitious nuclear testing in the midwest and southwest. Throw in the South too, I'll happily accept getting bombed for the greater good.

camarillobrillo  ·  527 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: September 14, 2016

Sabbatical. Self-imposed. Didn't want to be the rotten apple that spoils the bunch but I realized how much I needed this eutopia to dump my brain droppings.

I love this place. We're a steaming melting pot of perspectives. Small enough so the real losers out there don't bother to bother us. Anyways, I wouldn't expect many people here to understand the horror you're living right now but I do. Just wanted you to know you're not a special little snowflake.

You're online which means you're still coherent to reality which means you can still be SAVED, praise Heyzous! The worst is over man. Take your licks from Lady Justice and keep us in the know. Most of all take care of you. You want to bullshit privately I'm sure Hubski supports. I'm no rolemodel but I can definitely share stories and advice.

tacocat  ·  536 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Adventures in Decoupaging: Part 2

I've made a ton of decoupage collages into art.

I got tired of repeating myself for two years or whatever and quit.

KurtAlder  ·  579 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: July 20, 2016

Just wanted to let you know you inspired me to get sober. Thanks.

goobster  ·  598 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 9.3M Patient Records Hacked

I used to work at F5, so I got to be in some really scary meetings where people talked about a variety of attack types.

Ransomware and other attacks like it are still just basically the digital form of smash-n-grabs. It's like the late-night attack on the jewelry store, where someone bashes in the window, takes a fistful of shiny, and disappears into the night to sell that shiny to someone else.

What's scary are the tactical attacks.

CyberFighters were the first that I am aware of. They knew that banks had insurance against attacks. So they would DDoS the bank's site and charge a rate slightly less than the insurance would pay out. Sustained attacks over hours and days would eventually get the banks to cough up cash.

Blunt, but effective.

Then another group started launching DDoS attacks against banks, but it turns out these were just a front for the real crime, which was happening behind the scenes. A bank's web site gets DDoS'ed, and everyone is scrambling to redirect traffic to Akamai, profile the attack packets and teaching their ADC's to dump packets matching those attributes, etc.

And the phone rings constantly.

On one of these calls, "Eugene" with a weird accent, is on the phone from the branch office in New York is getting whacked and can't get access to his DNS. So he asks for the IP Address for the back end system they are re-routing traffic to, as a quick-fix to get around the DNS.

Shit. Eugene tries to log in, but his login isn't working because the Active Directory server needs to talk to the DNS, but the DNS is saturated by the ongoing DDoS. "Do you have a login that works without Active Directory, so I can get in?"

The hassled sysadmin has nine different Terminal sessions open on six different machines, and Akamai is on the other line, and the phone keeps slipping off his shoulder... so he gives Eugene the credentials to log in, bypassing the DNS and tunneling around the ADC directly into the control server or firewall in the DMZ.

... and five months later, a junior sysadmin is running some cleanup on some hard disks which were mis-configured in this old server over here, and they notice a couple gigs of text files in a weird numbered directory. Looks like log files, but, she goes ahead and TOPs the first hundred lines of the first file and sees... names... social security numbers... addresses... doctor's names... prescriptions...

She greps the directory for text strings in the format xxx-xx-xxxx, and gets hundreds of thousands of hits.

The junior sysadmin locks down the permissions on the disk. She copies the log files over to her personal directory. Checks the accesses... huge numbers of IP Addresses that start with 5.8.x.x ...

Eventually someone figures out what happened, and the DDoS attack was a distraction for the social-engineering hack from "Eugene", who then got behind the back doors, and made himself comfortable inside their data center, siphoning off data constantly for months.

These attacks aren't new. They are ongoing today.

It's just nobody talks about them because of what it would do to their stock prices. So everyone keeps these breaches under wraps.

And this is going on all the time.

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video  ·  #documentary  ·  #syria
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b_b  ·  671 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Reef discovered in the mouth of the Amazon River, under the silt

Super cool.

Last week in the New Yorker they had a story about a scientist's quest to cross breed corals (sorry, not sure if it's paywalled) to be acidification and temperature robust. I wonder if these strange new species thriving in crazy conditions will help such efforts.