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mk  ·  238 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: December 21, 2016

Yesterday, I essentially put in my notice at a workplace I have been at for 15 years.

This next year ought to be a different one.

mk  ·  649 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Things to do today - November 5th

    Pretend you are an alien and try to get a free soda from a fast food restaurant

This reminded me of a time that ecib and I showed up at a coney island around 2AM with just enough money to buy one hot dog.

ecib: Do you have, like a two-for-one deal on coney dogs?

girl behind counter: No.

ecib: Well, look, we have $2, I'm going to give it to you, and if we get two coney dogs for the price of one, that'd be cool.

girl behind counter: sigh... Order for two coney dogs.

mk  ·  671 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Test Post, Please Ignore

Do not be afraid; our fate cannot be taken from us; it is a gift.

mk  ·  718 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Young Goths at Risk of Depression, In Other News, Water is Wet.

As if you can understand the depths of my soul which resides forever in shadow.

mk  ·  728 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: What freedom of speech isn't

IMO it is important that people be able to discuss unpopular ideas and to share unpopular viewpoints. Many of the beliefs that are commonly held to be acceptable today were once unpopular. Also, if you haven't challenged your ideas, you likely haven't thought them through very well, which is an intellectual failing. However, as kleinbl00 states, it matters how you communicate your ideas, for if you aren't willing to respect your audience, then your audience has little reason to listen to you.

Of course, it is difficult to feel respect for those that hold some beliefs, particularly those that do not respect other groups of people a priori. For example, if someone proclaims to hate obese people, should I be expected to speak to them respectfully? Some might argue that if a person is unwilling to give respect to a group of people, then they do not deserve to be given respect in turn, even from those they do treat with respect. IMHO this is a mistake. I do not believe it is fruitful to engage ignorance with a lack of respect, and I think there is plenty of evidence to support this. Furthermore, I don't want ignorance to pull me into combative exchanges where the outcome is not in question. I'd much rather be someone that seeks to understand the cause of the ignorance, and when possible, someone that works to reduce it. I know that I have been ignorant, and continue to be ignorant. I know that the path to reducing my ignorance depends in part upon other people.

I am concerned about the extent to which political correctness and trigger warnings have stifled intellectual discourse. IMO the very concept of microaggression is microaggressive. Not one of us is without fault, and no one can understand or anticipate the complete spectra of perception that our words might elicit. To be intellectually curious means to be not so tender that words are dangerous regardless of their context.

In regards to Hubski, I am interested in creating fertile ground for thoughtful conversation. The actual topics being discussed are not unimportant, but the quality of the exchanges are of primary importance. To the extent that the parties involved are willing to tolerate combativeness or a lack of politeness, I am not concerned with the tenor of exchanges. However, if someone does not want to be a part of a conversation, or doesn't want to read it, they should have that option.

Our goal has been and will continue to be to provide fertile ground for thoughtful conversation. The freedom to discuss most any topic is an important element of that formula. However, IMHO the boundaries of the definition of freedom of speech aren't as interesting as many people make it out to be, and I am not interested in exploring the finer points of those boundaries to the significant expense of our primary goal.

mk  ·  773 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: I'm interested in a history lesson of Hubski

I had two motivations. One was to teach myself a language other than Fortran, and the other was to make a forum that was designed around thoughtful content and discussion. The first posters where friends that I talked into joining.

I've been online since BBSes, and was a very early Redditor. Making a site that is fertile ground for quality interaction presents a lot of difficult and compelling problems. We are still working on it.

The team is now comprised of myself, thenewgreen, insomniasexx and forwardslash.

thenewgreen joined a few months after I started, and understood the goals completely. He also had the idea to incorporate the logo into the site's mechanics. (I first created the logo when spray painting it onto a t-shirt when I was 14). His passion has not flagged a bit.

b_b and sounds_sound were early community managers. They still help. b_b tells us when our ideas are stupid, and sounds_sound often lends his design chops.

insomniasexx crashed a Google hangout meeting we were all having, and after a short while, we had to make her part of the team.

akkartik was the first coder besides myself. He knows Arc better than most anyone, which was a godsend. He still has commit access, last I checked. :)

forwardslash joined shortly after akkartik left, and like everyone on the team, he was an active user beforehand. He now carries the bulk of our coding expertise.

All of the current team members have day jobs/classes, and all the retired team members remain good friends.

We are likely to be announcing a new member to the team soon. :)

But that's only part of the story. There are numerous people on this site that have had just as much influence on its evolution. I am going to regret names that I leave out, but other early users that have influenced the site include: alpha0 theadvancedapes cgod NotPhil caio lil mike ecib steve minimum_wage kleinbl00 thundara lessismore JakobVirgil bfv Mindwolf zebra2 ooli and StJohn. Those are some of the earliest, I think all members for more than 1000 days now.

mk  ·  810 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Hubski, what do you believe?

I believe that we invest too much in being right.

I believe that we rely on validation more than evidence.

mk  ·  825 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: 'Mad Max: Fury Road' draws the ire of men's rights activists

I personally disagree that these issues surrounding pregnancy constitutes discrimination, as it is a matter complicated by many aspects, including (among others) the reality that the mother must carry the child, the gestation time being quite short in legal terms, and different moral and religious positions regarding abortion. But, as b_b commented below, the father's rights do not effectively end at conception. There are legal options regarding disputes of custody, and judicial discretion allows for consideration of individual circumstances. No doubt, some judges will undervalue the father's position, but in every aspect of law there are unfair outcomes. I don't see this area as particularly skewed, although it is one fraught with bias and divergent morals.

As for the selective service, I feel that it should either be phased out, or include woman as well. However, it did start in 1917, and was created by an all-male congress, so this could be seen as a self-imposed discrimination.

In fact, in both cases, IMO the current structures exist in large part due to a long-standing view of maleness that includes "manning up" and taking care of the baby, or defending one's country. I wouldn't consider these to be modern views, but those inherited from a time when to 'be a man' meant something that was defined largely by men, apart from ideas of sexual equality. We can change these laws to make them more fair, but I don't see their origins as anti-male, but rather in an out-dated view of maleness in large part defined by males of yesteryear.

mk  ·  833 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Pubski: May 6, 2015

I have a good friend that transitioned from art school to head of a successful neuroscience lab. His advice on related matters is this: "Bite off more than you think you can chew. It'll go down somehow."

mk  ·  859 days ago  ·  link  ·    ·  parent  ·  post: Feature Request: Zen mode hides badges

That sounds reasonable. There is no truth to be found in badges.