by: Devac

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kleinbl00
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I have a feeling that this is going to be one of those posts of mine that will ruffle some feathers. Let's make one thing clear: I've tried to put aside my own bias, pretty much failed at it but I am leaving it to show where I'm coming from. I'm only interested in the answer. That's it. It's not intended to be personal. Cool? Thanks.

    He came into the program as a multi-dimensional, highly skilled and multi-talented human being. I can't take any credit.

and this thing from IRC on the 20th November 2016:

    22:32 < lilski> I said earlier that I teach computer science students - but I basically teach them how to be human beings

What does it actually mean? Sorry for being peevish about it, but as someone who is focused on hard sciences and getting patronising treatment from most humanities-oriented people around me ever since I can remember, I can't help but resent some of this attitude (don't blame me, blame multiple people who told me verbatim that I must lack a soul to not appreciate some poem or picture :/). I've read a lot of your posts, many of the ones you've posted before I found Hubski and ones posted since then, but I'm at loss about what you actually do in class. What is the thing that your students lack and how does acquiring it make them into 'human beings'? What's about your students that your aim is to make them into those 'multidimensional human beings'? Sorry, but I simply loathe when in my own life the, supposedly, attuned to humanity people just throw me into some easy 'cog-head' category and go forth with their pre-existing assumption. I'm not angry or resentful specifically toward you, lil, but I'm asking because so far you have proven that you will not just dismiss my questions outright with something along the lines of "you will not understand, untermensh".

Aside from that, I agree with Odder. I had only one such interview so far and it was just… baffling. The guy who was interviewing me seemed to be thrown out of the loop when I didn't answer with some cliche line from a tutorial on interviews. Suffices to say that I ended up working in a bookstore as a clerk afterwards.

Devac  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: When it's good to be bad

I have stopped reading right about here:

    And yet a new school of thinking is challenging these received ways and arguing that straying from the path, even engaging in hedonistic behaviour, might be the surest way to success.

so I will only conclude that author has learned some lesson. Better late than never. But since I know how the narrative in pieces like this goes, I went straight for the ending and got:

    That he ever thought he could achieve perfection, without setbacks, without respites, Franklin admitted, was his gravest error. He had been naïve. And prideful.

See? I was right. Good for him!

So, have some shit that I've learned from my father so far:

- In all likelihood you have only this one life, so try to be happy.

- Moderate yourself as much and long as you are comfortable (and I don't have to bail you out).

- Don't obsess over minor failings. Every problem is bigger that it really is on first glance. Look at it when you'll get over it.

- You probably don't know what you want.

- Don't be a dick. Or at least try to not be one and treat others as they deserve.

- Hard work or not, you are not entitled to anything in life. There's likely someone much better anyway.

- As with toilets, try to leave the place in at least the state you found it yourself.

- Fear is the mind-killer, but not everything requires higher mental faculties.

- You can strive for true perfection but you can never achieve it. It also applies to this list.

And I didn't even need to quote philosophers.

Devac  ·  link  ·  parent  ·  post: A Patriot Game Theory

📰🇷🇺🏆, 😨👊

I was given an opportunity to start high school at thirteen, pretty uncommon in my country. Despite what my family was telling me, that I should stay where I am, I went with it. It took me almost two weeks to get all the pros and cons straight, but it was my most adult decision pretty much up to this point in life.

It was hard. To be honest, it is still hard. People often assume that such a small difference in age should not affect anyone or go to the other end of the spectrum; assume that this is just a kid who does not know any better. Despite the fact that I was lacking a lot in cynical aspects of my decision back then, I would still do it the same if I was given some time travel way to do it all again.

Another aspect is the fact that I am pretty much financially independent and my eighteenth birthday is about two months from now. I get my scholarship, my parents still send me some money but I have never gone above my own 'earnings'. It's a bit of a buffer, but I would consider it as my failing if I were to ever use their resources. That makes my expenses very tight, but I don't mind it. I'm on my own due to two or three decisions that resulted from the first one. It's "unfair" in the way that I can count on them backing me up (and considering my expenses vs what they send me, I could probably live for next three semesters just on that), but even in such case; Some of the students I'm attending classes with call me kid despite having their parents cash in their wallets and eating food that they did not make themselves. It's hard, but I do consider my current state as both lucky and one that I can call a point of pride.

I hope that you will get kick-ass foster family soon :D. Keep your chin up and think of Hubski as… Delad glädje är dubbel glädje och delad sorg är halv sorg ;).